4th Tire Failure - This is getting old - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 11-13-2012, 09:04 AM   #15
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Axles are straight, it's just the tires. Plenty of people have had bad luck with st tires and switched to lt's, and had no more problems.
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Old 11-13-2012, 03:34 PM   #16
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And, many people have had bad luck with LT tires, and switched to STs, and had no more problems.

I have never had "trouble" with either, but find that the trailer tows more true with STs, because of the stiffer sidewalls. Less bobbling around.

I think one needs to pay closer attention to the load limits on whatever tire you use on a trailer. For one thing, almost everybody's trailer is a lot heavier than they think it is. Second, when you go over a hump in the road, and the trailer comes down on the suspension, it is applying a LOT more load on the tires than the trailer's static weight. On a car, this additional dynamic load is spread across four tires. On these trailers, it is spread across just two. Additionally, most trailers are a lot heavier on the drivers side than on the curb side, so that tires is disproportionally loaded.
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Old 11-13-2012, 04:27 PM   #17
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I agree with Paul that in ST tire failures it's often more a case of abuse than of design issues. For example, I believe that all ST tires are speed rated at 65 MPH, yet I can't count how many times, on a hot August day here in SoCal, I have had someone zip by me, either on the way to or the way back from "The River", at 75 and even 80 MPH with a trailer in tow and a ton of personal junque hang off of and out of the trailer they were pulling.

And I would guess that they pay just as much attention to the tire pressure and load conditions as they do to the posted speed limit of 55 MPH for trailer towing.

And FWIW: One would guess that LT tires would do better on misaligned axles, if only because they have more sidewall flex than ST's and would be less prone to scrubbing. But I haven't a clue how to easily and accurately determine if an axle is positioned at a right angle to the direction of travel or not.
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Old 11-13-2012, 05:39 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul E Henning View Post
And, many people have had bad luck with LT tires, and switched to STs, and had no more problems..
Over the years we have had people complain about some LT's tires and considering how many here are running with ST's vs LT's you would think we would hear *a lot* more complaints than we do if they were really as bad as some think they are.

I like others I suspect a lot has to do with miles traveled, age, condition of roads frequently traveled and speed traveled. I am also surprised when coming or going to a trailer meet when some goes flying by me doing more than 65 mph and I know they only have ST's on the trailer. I also know that a party who was frequently complaining here about ST tires wasnt shy about admitting they didnt stick to 65 mph.

I have not had an actual blow out with an ST tire but I have had to replace both of my last two sets of tires shortly after they hit 3 years of age. Although the tread was still good and no tread wear issues - if you looked closely between the treads you could see they were starting to separate. The last set I replaced had about 10,000 miles on them when I noticed it.
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Old 11-13-2012, 05:42 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Miller
I agree with Paul that in ST tire failures it's often more a case of abuse than of design issues. For example, I believe that all ST tires are speed rated at 65 MPH, yet I can't count how many times, on a hot August day here in SoCal, I have had someone zip by me, either on the way to or the way back from "The River", at 75 and even 80 MPH with a trailer in tow and a ton of personal junque hang off of and out of the trailer they were pulling.

And I would guess that they pay just as much attention to the tire pressure and load conditions as they do to the posted speed limit of 55 MPH for trailer towing.

And FWIW: One would guess that LT tires would do better on misaligned axles, if only because they have more sidewall flex than ST's and would be less prone to scrubbing. But I haven't a clue how to easily and accurately determine if an axle is positioned at a right angle to the direction of travel or not.
I think the speed is a big thing. Here it's 75mph for trailers. I believe iowa and minnesota are 70 mph. That's why I prefer lt's on a trailer. Once again, the axles are not misaligned. It's quite easy to check. Run a string from your hitch to your axles, the length should be the same.

I just put my new axle in that way. Level the trailer, drop a plumb bob from the fifth wheel, and measure back from there.

Three of the tires will take more weight than the trailer, not even close to overloaded.
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Old 11-17-2012, 11:18 AM   #20
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We've run our Marathons at 100% of capacity and have never had a failure of our Goodyear Marathons in probably 40,000 miles and 5 years including a couple 1,000 of dirt road miles. We have a single axle Scamp 16 loaded to 2400 lbs.

You did not mention your tire size nor the tire pressure, that would help, however, depending on your tire, the load capacity can drop quickly, at 35 psi they could be down to 1500 lbs per tire.

Another factor is that the load does not split evenly depending on load and the road. As well it would be interesting to know the Casita's weight, the 17s can be very heavy for their size.

We just returned from a 315 day, 23,000 mile trip and our now preparing to leave for the winter. In the process I went to grease my bearings and was surprised to find one of the Marathons was unevenly worn, to the steel on the inside of one tire. The rubber was really worn but only on half the circumference. Definitely blow out material.

What had happened is that who ever previously greased the bearings had not adequately seated the bearings so the tire seemed to wobble on the hub causing the weird wear pattern. (When jacked up one could simulate the wobble by rocking the tire from side to side.) Fortunately though weakened it did not blow.

Your tire size and running pressure would be interesting.
Norm;
I have/had the Goodyear HMG2020 ST205/75D - 14
The load range D has a recommended max air pressure of 65psi.ad 65mph
I routinely run at 62-64 psi and try and keep it at 65mph or lower.
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Old 11-17-2012, 01:03 PM   #21
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Are the wheels stock on the trailer ?

Changing to a different wheel can case problems.
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Old 11-17-2012, 08:51 PM   #22
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Changing wheels will not cause a tire to blow. This is a well known, well documented problem all over the Internet, Goodyear, Carlisle, you name it. If you were incredibly ignorant, you could get a rim way too narrow and wear the center, or wayyyy wide, and have it run on the sidewalls, but anybody that couldn't tell a problem there shouldn't be pulling a trailer.

I suspect most people on this forum get lucky for two reasons.

1. The trailers are light, and the tires don't get maxed out much.

2. They have undersized tow vehicles, and are staying safe and driving slow.

Guys with large campers, car trailers, and bigger tow vehicles are much more likely to see these issues pop up due to weight and speed.
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Old 11-17-2012, 09:22 PM   #23
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LT tires are not a solution for trailers...the tread design is all wrong, for one thing. Why would one put a drive/steer tire on a wheel that only needs to follow? Big truck drivers know this, and the tread pattern on their trailers is designed accordingly, as is the tread pattern on ST tires.

The number one reason for flat tires is over/underinflation, folks. The number two reason is heat buildup due to high speeds/environmental temps, or a combination of the two.

And there's no empirical evidence that the country of manufacture has anything whatsoever to do with tire longevity/performance.

Francesca
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Old 11-17-2012, 10:48 PM   #24
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Until the tire industry wakes up and makes trailer tires for the modern highway, LT tires are about the only option, IMHO. Like I said, I'be probably blown around 8 st tires on a 4 tire trailer. Some of them blew on their maiden voyage. The 15 year old, weather checked LT tire? Still going strong.

Each to their own. I plan on switching my st's to the car trailer, and buying lt's for my camper. It's not worth the risk of ripping the side of the camper off, to me. The car trailer has 3/16" steel fenders and two axles, doesn't matter if a tire blows on it.

As for semi tires…that's not even in the same ballpark. They also will blow, been there, done that. They were also rated for 70mph. Some are also for steer or drive wheels. None of which really matters for our uses, anyway.

If somebody wants to drive 55-60, st's are probably fine. If they drive at speed limits, then they're a ticking time bomb, in my experience.

As for the country of manufacture not mattering, check reviews if Goodyear marathons pre/post china.
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Old 11-17-2012, 11:13 PM   #25
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I've had Goodyear Marathons on my Escape 17 since I picked it up at the factory in July 2008. Same two tires, gravel washboard roads and freeways. No problems.
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