A Very Reluctant Spouse - Page 6 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 12-14-2015, 12:30 PM   #71
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Hi Thomas and wife
a couple of my thoughts.....is wife shopping with you for the rig, and then have the fun of decorating and supplying it. Is she closely involved in the travel process?
Having a rig is better than any hotel I've ever stayed in. Mine has all the comforts I love and hopefully you're wife will join you and experience this first hand.
If your wife decides not to join you Phillip is absolutely right...if you go solo WINS are a great group for singles, married or not. They are very active and love to explore places they are parked at. Go to www.rvsingles.org for their activities and fun
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Old 12-14-2015, 12:58 PM   #72
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From Stude,
Utah has Moab, Bryce Canyon, Dead Horse Canyon, Zion (which in my eyes was the best of the lot. Seeing Bryce from the bottom on the back of a horse is the only way to see, looking down from the top is better if there is a light snow fall as it really stands out,

Stude- somehow I misled you on where I had been. Like you, Zion was my favorite, Moab was memorable. Best of all, I liked this primitive campground NW of Crested Butte just below Paonia, called Lost Lake. It looked like Switzerland. And when bored I could head into town and met several of the locals. The Mayor at the time (1977) invited me to a card game at a local bar (penny ante, dime raises). What was so nice was it was fine to bring my dog into the bar(off season with 1200 residents down from 60,000 in ski season).

I still remember sitting there, talking over the card game and I told them there was one thing I really didn't understand-it really had me baffled. Why would any fool climb up a tree to cut it down 12-15' above the ground- I'd seen many like that. There was about 3 seconds of silence and then the whole room broke out with laughter, hard laughter, at that. And the Mayor turned to me and said in a kind manner... "he was standing on the ground when he cut those trees, on top of 12' of snow". Then another man said "Maybe it's time to raise the card betting limit to a dollar"....more laughter.

They were one of my best memories of that whole trip. The scenery was spectacular, but it's really the people you remember.

And SteveBaz.."If the wife doesn't want to go that's fine. Put your stuff in storage and leave her behind. Separate your financials before you go"---I had such a good belly laugh over that one, I may have pulled a muscle !
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Old 12-14-2015, 01:16 PM   #73
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Thomas,

With no real psychology training, it sounds to me like your wife's delayed
reaction and reasons/excuses might be related to some fears and anxieties
that could easily disappear during some shorter trips? The unknown is usually
a scary thing to many folks.

A couple more quick items .....

For my wife's favorite TV shows, we set up a DVR to capture multiple
episodes, that we can watch when we get home, if we can't watch them
from our trailer/campground. Many campgrounds now have a
cable connection or local TV channels that we can view in the trailer
with an external amplified antenna. If you don't have a TV service with
DVR capabilities (cable/satellite/IP-network), TIVO makes an OTA
(over the air) DVR that costs ~$49 to buy and ~$15 monthy service fee.
(Check Best Buy) With a WiFi connection (at many restaurants and coffee
shops?) and some of the streaming services (NetFlix, Hulu+, Amazon
Prime, etc.), you can often catch up on previous episodes of her favorite
shows without even having a DVR,

For contact with girlfriends, kids, and family, a WiFi connection and a
small tablet and/or netbook/laptop lets my wife exchange emails and
check in on Facebook, etc. A smartphone allows quick text message
exchanges and/or phone conversations. These days, there is really
not much reason to feel completely "cut off" from friends and family.

For the "you might have a heart attack" concern, my wife is fairly
comfortable with hitching our little 13' Scamp to either of our SUVs
and with the whole towing/parking process. With a huge RV, it might
be a different story, but she has little fear of being able to get home
without my help if something unforeseen should happen.

Like many women, my wife is sensitive and hates to be an imposition
on friends and family in other cities (i.e. making the couple or kids
give up their bedroom or making folks in the house feel cramped for
space, making them change bed linens, etc.). With a tiny FGRV, we
can park in a driveway, on the back patio, or even in the street and
be just fine. Use of a shower or an electric cord would be a bonus,
but we can dry camp just fine. No need to be an imposition in order
to visit friends/relatives in another city.

Just a little more food for thought ..............

Again ..... Best of luck to you!

Ray
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Old 12-14-2015, 01:33 PM   #74
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Rdickens..."In that book, Michael says that people do things or make changes for
their own internal reasons. Without being seriously manipulative, the
goal of "instant influence" is simply to help people find their own reasons
for doing something or making some change. "

Thanks so much Ray for the book link and your thoughts. This knitting thing is becoming a bit of an obsession, and that falls right in line with what you are saying from the book. If I show her that link to the knitting locations, I have little doubt she will be sitting in the truck saying.."C'mon, lets go,I don't want to be late for registration, I hope it's a nice campground."

Paula I will get her involved if possible. Thats a good idea about the decorating and then there are all those other things-sheets, frying pan, towels,comforter...oh she does like shopping.
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Old 12-14-2015, 04:26 PM   #75
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Hi. When Paul retired, he took a train trip entirely around the USA--weeks--by himself. We decided it was best that way because he got twice the trip (paid for by his boss). I stayed home with the dogs.


Six years ago, when he wanted the GetAwayVan, I didn't want it at all--but seeing the little house in the driveway inspired me beyond belief, and soon I was camping in it, partly because Paul did all the work (except decorating, and stocking, and planning, and making reservations, and making to-do-lists--). We only took one dog once, and she vomited the whole way. Then the crows ate her breakfast and dinner.


NOW we're back into it after four years, this time the little house in the driveway is a trailer, and once again, I'm totally involved in the planning, sewing, decorating (well, I will be when it has a floor and walls again). Right now I'm the sourcer--Paul's just the "Sorcer's apprentice)--bad pun.


Maybe she'll like the little house once you get one--but even if it ends up with your going alone or with the dog, we both say, GO. She sounds like she'll be OK, and if she's not, sounds like you'd be happy to welcome her any time.


Lots more to talk about when you've spent time apart like that--just the discussions about why on earth Paul didn't hold the baby alligator in Louisiana can occupy entire hours.


Kai in Seattle
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Old 12-14-2015, 04:48 PM   #76
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In addition to the book previously mentioned, a must read for all campers, if you haven't already read it, is Travels With Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck. It is the story of John Steinbeck's solo journey with his dog Charley in a pick up truck fashioned with a homemade camper shell.
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Old 12-14-2015, 05:04 PM   #77
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Ci Git! (From Travels with Charley) Also, Pffft!


Trip, 1960, Book 1961.
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Old 12-14-2015, 05:05 PM   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilda View Post
In addition to the book previously mentioned, a must read for all campers, if you haven't already read it, is Travels With Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck. It is the story of John Steinbeck's solo journey with his dog Charley in a pick up truck fashioned with a homemade camper shell.
Hmmmmm. Not exactly how it happened.

Steinbeck's Camper Rocinante was custom built by the Wolverine Camper Company, and most of what he wrote in Travels with Charley, is considered fiction. He may have spent as many as 7 nights in the camper, but even that is open to question. Here is the "Pants on Fire" lowdown. Many others are available on-line.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/04/bo...king.html?_r=0

But you can still see the camper that he spent a few nights in at the Steinbeck museum in Salinas, CA
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Old 12-14-2015, 05:21 PM   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Miller View Post
Hmmmmm. Not exactly how it happened.

Steinbeck's Camper Rocinante was custom built by the Wolverine Camper Company, and most of what he wrote in Travels with Charley, is considered fiction. He may have spent as many as 7 nights in the camper, but even that is open to question. Here is the "Pants on Fire" lowdown. Many others are available on-line.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/04/bo...king.html?_r=0

But you can still see the camper that he spend a few nights in at the Steinbeck museum in Salinas, CA
Have read the book at least three times...last time made a number of notes, including how NO ONE calls themself Ci-Git (from a tombstone, literally, "Here Lies") -- but it sounds JUST like the way Steinbeck wrote, which is quite appealing for what it is. I thought the whole bok sounded "stagey," for one thing he fiddles aorund in New England for weeks, all the while bemoaning the oncoming snows of winter and his need to get going...while delaying, and his attitude toward the woman with the toy dog (while his standard poodle Charley worried her) was nasty. I'd be concerned, too, if a very large dog were sniffing around my pugs, though they'd be so--um--pugnacious that Charley might well have backed off without my having to protest--as John Steinbeck says about the woman, like a "bull b**ch." I think that's very nasty.


Anyway, loved the book times #1 and 2, not so sur time #3, but it's still a classic American travel story in spite of or maybe because of the incredible amount of booze purchased and served out to all and sundry.


The linked article was excellent, and I'm feeling more forgiving now since Mr. Steinbeck was so ill, depressed, and so forth. I can see that.


And since this thread is about food, he thought nothing of writing about meals where he says he basically heated a can of beans and ate it as is. Now there's minimalist camp cooking for you!


I also learned how to wash clothes on the road from his book--in a 5-gallon bucket with some hot water and soap suds, and a line across the middle of the trailer/camper. Been wondering if the amerigo walls would be strong enough to hold up a gallon of water in a 5-gallon bucket that way. (Organic Castille soap, probably raspberry flavored from Trader Joe's, of course!)
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Old 12-14-2015, 08:28 PM   #80
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I once said here that if I ever camp alone, i.e. "unsupervised", my laundry is done in the stream, weighted by rocks, while I am hiking up the mountain. Call it the "green" way, if you wish.
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Old 12-15-2015, 04:36 AM   #81
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Being somewhat cynical and having read all the suggestions proposed to convince OhTom's wife to "change her attitude" and to embrace RVing, I have to wonder if the OP's wife were trying to get him to take up knitting and joyfully go to knitting classes (or in other words, do something in which he likely has no interest), how many members here would have forwarded suggestions to get him to "ease" into the knitting lifestyle, with the hope or intention of him ultimately embracing it and becoming an avid knitter. George W. Bush often stated he didn't like broccoli. Would taking him to a broccoli patch or convincing him to sample a small portion lead him to change his mind? The OP will not change his spouse's opinion; any change will have to come from her. It sounds to me that she is rather adamant about her feelings.


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Old 12-15-2015, 05:09 AM   #82
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As an aside, I generally don't like broccoli but....

We go to a little farm here in FL where we pick strawberries. Her strawberries are not for 'store selling', simply selected and grown for sweet eating. One day we bought some of her broccoli. it was like a different vegetable. I now eat 'fresh' broccoli.
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Old 12-15-2015, 05:20 AM   #83
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Originally Posted by honda03842 View Post
As an aside, I generally don't like broccoli but....

We go to a little farm here in FL where we pick strawberries. Her strawberries are not for 'store selling', simply selected and grown for sweet eating. One day we bought some of her broccoli. it was like a different vegetable. I now eat 'fresh' broccoli.

Precisely my point, Norm. You had to decide that broccoli wasn't so bad; not your spouse. And that came from your willingness to try it. Some people are not willing to try things they do not like or think they will not like.
Incidentally, most strawberries here are awful; they have been hybridized to be large, colorful, and to travel well done but flavor has been lost in the process, all in the attempt to supply the rest of the nation with "fresh" produce during the winter months. The same can be said for Florida tomatoes; flavorless in comparison to tomatoes grown in the 4-season states.


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Old 12-15-2015, 06:23 AM   #84
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Agreement

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Precisely my point, Norm. You had to decide that broccoli wasn't so bad; not your spouse. And that came from your willingness to try it. Some people are not willing to try things they do not like or think they will not like.
Incidentally, most strawberries here are awful; they have been hybridized to be large, colorful, and to travel well done but flavor has been lost in the process, all in the attempt to supply the rest of the nation with "fresh" produce during the winter months. The same can be said for Florida tomatoes; flavorless in comparison to tomatoes grown in the 4-season states.

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It's in the trying that we find out for ourselves.

I happen to dislike most tomatoes, The local tomatoes are the way I remember them from my childhood.

FL bought tomatoes are great. There's a guy who has a stand right at the Walmart exit where he sells gloriously deep red tomatoes and watermelon, just a different product from what one finds in stores.

Of course I'm sure you know every state has four seasons. FL has four growing seasons, and each is longer (in days not sunlight hours) than more northern climates. Virtually everything can be grown in FL. Blueberries is the latest crop spreading thru the state.

We've already had fresh corn, strawberries, tomatoes, watermelon, of course oranges, .... fresh and generally inexpensive.

I admit we live in one of the most agricultural counties in FL. Tourists are relatively rare where we are. Cattle and oranges dominate. We are seekers of the rural.

My point in posting the broccoli story was the 'discovery aspect of life', the benefits of seeking. I understand that you can be comfortable where you are and that is enough for many. If it were true for all, the human species would still be in Africa and never have spread across the world.

P.S. Another magical property of FL is the long 'availability season' of many items. For example, strawberries are available from Dec- April., Fresh from the tree Oranges for a similar period.
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