A word of warning - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-27-2011, 10:44 PM   #15
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I agree with Mike that less hunting is being done. But the real enemy of hunters is not lack of acceptance by society--it's old age. In most states, the number of hunting licenses continues to fall every year. This article blames urbanization:

DNR sees decrease in Iowa hunting licenses

I think there's a lot of factors involved but the biggest problem is probably that hunting is not a hobby that someone spontaneously decides to take up. It's usually a craft that's passed down from father to son and this mentoring isn't happening as much anymore.

I'm an environmentalist, but I respect the job the hunters do in trying to keep the deer population in check. If it wasn't for them, every house in Colorado would have a deer eating the front lawn. I don't know the long term answer. Maybe re-introduce more wolves?
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Old 07-28-2011, 07:36 AM   #16
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Cougar Sightings

Up our way (Alberta), cougar (mountain lion) sightings are way up. They are becoming more common, even in major urban areas. I have been told by Fish & Wildlife that there are 5-6 individual cats in the Edmonton River Valley system, through to Fort Saskatchewan. There have been serious attacks. Our acreage neighbour across the road had one come down from a large fir tree one morning last year!

The thing to remember about these cats, is there are only carnivorous, and since they are the top of the food chain, we are considered food.

I'm not sure about the tie to hunting, since these are hunted only as trophies or by rancheres experiencing predation on their livestock.

True, hunter numbers are way down in Canada, mostly due to the double whammy of non-lead shot regulations for migratory hunting and the requirement to register all guns made since 1899.

However, it may also be that the effort to beuatify our urban landscapes with return-to-nature park systems is having some unintended consequences.

Another factor is the continued loss of wilderness areas due to our urban sprawl is forcing these animals to relocate elsewhere. One spot comes to mind for me, where I used to hunt grouse through miles of virgin bush. Today, it is mainly an acreage area with a few large farms. The real bush is now some 50 miles further west!.

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Old 07-28-2011, 08:38 AM   #17
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The perfect storm for hikers and backcountry campers....Intentionally repopulate the predators, while taking away the the only practical means of defense from people.
Sounds like conspiracy to commit murder by the politicians, using predators as weapons. What next? No belt buckles or metal objects which could choke the predators and interupt a "natural" meal?
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Old 07-28-2011, 08:42 AM   #18
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The forested area has truly increased in New England. It was not that long ago when NE was clear cut for farms and fuel. Now the forests have been re-established in a good part of the region. It's a similar situation all over the world. for example forests density in England increqased 10% in the last decade and even 1% in South America.

It turns out that CO2 is a fertilizer for green plants.

When we first started traveling we only heard coyotes in parts of the west, now we hear them all over northern NE and even have seen one in our high density beach community. In our community we would always have a lot of feral cats, people leaving them after the summer season. Now you rarely see them and road kill just disappears. The town crew says it's the coyotes that take the feral cats and clean up the road kill. Can wolves be far behind, definitely there plenty of deer?

A few years ago NH decided to have a 2 week bear hunting season. The first week so many bear were taken they closed the season. It turns out that we have tons of bear. I believe NJ with a population density near India's has 5000 bears. They wanted to have a bear hunting season but were fought and the state caved in to pressure.

The wilds return.

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Old 07-28-2011, 09:02 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
It's funny- the problem out here in the West has become one of not enough predators.
The deer population has exploded to the point that they're referred to in some jurisdictions as "urban rats".
Folks can't even have gardens in some places.
The big cats, etc. used to keep their numbers thinned...but not so much anymore.
And as for hunters taking up the slack...in my State, the deer limit remains one per hunter per year.
Kind of sad, really- many deer starve to death each year due to overpopulation, lack of forage, and loss of natural habitat.


Francesca
Is that one per hunter include per car, we have a lot of car/deer collisions here in Pa.
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Old 07-28-2011, 10:27 AM   #20
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Is that one per hunter include per car, we have a lot of car/deer collisions here in Pa.
Here, too!

You'll probably find this hard to believe, but my daughter in law hit/killed a deer a couple of years ago and actually inquired of the local Game Warden about salvaging the meat.
She was told that she couldn't because the season was closed, and that even if it were open, she'd have to have had a license/deer tag when she hit the deer. Guess that means road kill counts as part of the limit here....

What a waste

Francesca
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Old 07-28-2011, 01:10 PM   #21
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I hit and killed a deer and people I know came and got it doe meat. They just registered or with the police. I don't think it interfered with their limit, although I'm not sure
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Old 07-28-2011, 03:16 PM   #22
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I understand some states gather up (fresh, of course) road kill and use it for food in the prisons.

I don't know that pumas were ever a big threat to humans but they can put a sheep rancher out of business in short order. OTOH, there is something primeval about being eaten. Often, because they are smaller, children are the victims, as listed in the linked article.
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Old 07-28-2011, 03:45 PM   #23
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It always puzzles me why ranchers don't spring for more guard dogs. They've got all this cheap subsidized land to use, surely there's some extra cheddar for a bunch of akbash or something? Anyway, there is something maybe appropriately humbling for humans about the fact that sometimes we're not the top predator in the room. I've been (safely) close enough to big fat wild alligators as well as semi domesticated wolves to have that feeling of being put firmly in my place.
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Old 07-28-2011, 03:53 PM   #24
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And what ever happened to shepherds and cowboys?
From ancient times until recently, didn't people guard the animals we domesticated?
I wonder how much predation has increased since the employment of human guards stopped...
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Old 07-28-2011, 04:38 PM   #25
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Transcontinental walkabouts are one thing; indigenous coy dogs are another. Nuf' said. Actually could probably use a few coyotes in the east to thin the whitetail. Oh, they're already here! Good. They couldn't screw things up worse than the DNR.

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Old 07-28-2011, 10:47 PM   #26
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I live in Southern California and we have a number of sightings of Mountain Lions around here every year. The Park up the street from here has mountain lion warnings posted every couple of months or so when there are sightings. However, given the large population of hikers, campers, bikers and joggers running through the trails on any given day, there are very few attacks on humans. (family pets are a whole other story. There are many instances of cats and dogs being attacked in their yards in broad daylight. Two years ago a guy near here heard a noise on his porch at twighlight, and when he opened the door he caught a glimpse of a big mountain lion leaping over his 7 ft. stone wall with his 75 lb. Husky in its jaws.)

I hike frequently (rarely alone, but sometimes get separated from the group a bit) and I tend to carry a walking stick....the Naturalists around here say that if you are confronted by a mountain lion the best course of action is to back up against a tree and stab at it with your stick. Running is a bad idea. I hike with the Sierra Club and have done so for more than 15 years, and of the large number of people who go out into the wilderness once or twice a week year round, I have never met anyone who has actually been attacked by a mountain lion....

I think on the rare occasions people are attacked by wild animals (I will throw bears and sharks and coyotes and moose/buffalo into the mix) the attacks are so sensationalized that it makes people fearful even though the chance of being killed by a serial killer is probably much, much higher than of being attacked or hurt by a wild animal, and I honestly doubt that a serial killer is all that much of a risk either ( 95% of all people die in bed-and no one issues warnings about the dangers of lying in bed ).
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Old 07-28-2011, 11:17 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toni M T View Post
I live in Southern California and we have a number of sightings of Mountain Lions around here every year. The Park up the street from here has mountain lion warnings posted every couple of months or so when there are sightings. However, given the large population of hikers, campers, bikers and joggers running through the trails on any given day, there are very few attacks on humans. (family pets are a whole other story. There are many instances of cats and dogs being attacked in their yards in broad daylight. Two years ago a guy near here heard a noise on his porch at twighlight, and when he opened the door he caught a glimpse of a big mountain lion leaping over his 7 ft. stone wall with his 75 lb. Husky in its jaws.)

I hike frequently (rarely alone, but sometimes get separated from the group a bit) and I tend to carry a walking stick....the Naturalists around here say that if you are confronted by a mountain lion the best course of action is to back up against a tree and stab at it with your stick. Running is a bad idea. I hike with the Sierra Club and have done so for more than 15 years, and of the large number of people who go out into the wilderness once or twice a week year round, I have never met anyone who has actually been attacked by a mountain lion....

I think on the rare occasions people are attacked by wild animals (I will throw bears and sharks and coyotes and moose/buffalo into the mix) the attacks are so sensationalized that it makes people fearful even though the chance of being killed by a serial killer is probably much, much higher than of being attacked or hurt by a wild animal, and I honestly doubt that a serial killer is all that much of a risk either ( 95% of all people die in bed-and no one issues warnings about the dangers of lying in bed ).

Ya what he said.....

Which reminds me the bear attack in Alaska was brought about by the young folks not knowing how to act when they saw the bear. Yelling, screaming and running is sure to bring on an attack. Standing still, the bear probably can't even tell what you are. They don't have very good eye sight.
Basic rule stop, don't run, quietly back away, don't make eye contact.

I haven't heard of any predator attacks on humans that wasn't caused by either the humans or their dogs.
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Old 07-28-2011, 11:26 PM   #28
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Well put, Toni and Byron !

I carry a stick in cougar country, too- and the rule when we're hiking with children is that they're placed in the middle of our "pack" so that there's a fence of grownups between them and the unknown.
Interesting note on "big cat protection":
The British with the ever-present "bumbershoot" introduced this precaution in tiger country...
Upon such an encounter, the umbrella is pointed at the cat and opened and closed quickly, which apparently deceives the cat into thinking its "victim" is some kind of huge predatory bird or something. Off they go, supposedly.
The custom persists today, and I've often thought that the person that perfects a hiking staff with a lightweight umbrella incorporated would make a- well, a "killing" selling it to the more cautious outdoor enthusiasts among us.

Francesca
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