About Schmidt - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-03-2003, 10:45 AM   #15
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You are so right

JR, you hi it good. My husband is very much the 401k kind of guy, because he was/and is raised that way. His parents are VERY much like that. Right now, his sister is going through a horrible time at work, and all they can tell her is hang in there, your retirement pention depends on it. And I keep telling her to get out of there and find something else that you LIKE and makes you at least don't mind going to work. Life is too short, and she has been to the doctor once already for stress related illness. GET OUT.

I learned it a long time ago, as I missed many fun things (trips or special events) because "I had to work" that life's too short. Now, we have a beautfiful house on the lake, and we get out on it twice a year. I too, SWORE I wasnt going to let this house consume me, and it has. We don't enjoy our surroundings NEARLY as much as we should. I also have already told my husband that if anything happens to him, I am handing the house to his kids and hitting the road with a new truck and 5th wheel (Scamp, of course) the place is a work farm, and I would never be able to take car of it myself anyway. I love to meet new people, and can't wait to get started. Of course we will do this when he retires too, of course. 12 years left!
We think about it daily. My job in life is getting HIM to slow down a little. But his problem is he LOVES his job. Or I guess that's MY problem.
Oh well, it's all true. There are too many people that learn it too late.
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Old 06-03-2003, 11:34 AM   #16
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At what cost?

I work, in part, to keep insurance. When I was self-employed, I could not afford insurance. In the last year each of the three doctors I see regularly handed me prescriptions. I was up to like 6 medications by the time the doctor handed me a cholesterol lowering drug. Then I stopped and thought about it:

I am working up to 10 hours a day and commuting roundtrip 2 1/2 hours a day so I can make just enough to pay for insurance and medications to treat illnesses that are almost 100% controllable by lifestyle. I spend my life sitting behind a desk in a poorly lit office listening to people fuss about stuff that had no lasting significance. I leave the house before breakfast and often eat dinner at my desk. Cutting back on hours is not an option. There are no jobs closer to my house.

What would happen if I exercised (instead of sat in the car 12 hours or more per week), ate healthy foods (there are no veggies in the vending machine here), got enough sleep (5-6 hours was not cutting it), and RELAXED instead of stressing all day about stuff that won't even matter in a year, let alone a decade?

I fantasized about selling the house and using the proceeds to pay down some of the bills that were haunting me. I would not have had the courage to do it any time soon if I hadn't been laid off. Right now, I have NO IDEA what I'll be doing for income when the house money runs out. But, I do know I'll enjoy the next 6 months rather than spend them panicking about bankruptcy. I suspect I'll be a whole lot healthier in 6 months than I am right now.

On top of all the other benefits, I can spend more than one week a year with my mother who has been quite ill for many years. I can spend time with my 18 year old sister and my two year old niece, both of whom need the same amount of guidance! I can visit my older sister and her baseball team (NINE kids!). And I can reestablish relationships with my brothers, who I hardly see anymore.

This teeny fiberglass house is a lifesaver (perhaps literally if it gets my cholesterol levels down). Cheap enough to own it outright. Small enough to tow behind the car I already own. And I'll have my own roof no matter where I end up. Even if the worst happens and the bank takes my car, I'll still have my fiberglass house!
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Old 06-06-2003, 07:02 AM   #17
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Well, out of curiosity after reading this thread, we went out and rented Schmidt last night. Yikes! This confirms that there is a butt for every chair. We found the flick depressing and without focus or message. Frankly, I wonder why it was ever made?

I think the movie had a chance when they began showing the futility of buck-chasing while sacrificing a full life. Maybe if the Jack Nickolson character had driven into Bryce Canyon or some such spectacular sight at the end and asked, "Now where has this been all my life," the movie may have come together. As it is the movie merely points out how messed up a large segment of society is today. Thank heaven for the sanity of those here on this forum who "get it" and are out there enjoying this wonderful land.

Just one vote. Thumbs down on Schmidt! :zz
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Old 06-06-2003, 07:09 AM   #18
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JR

Right on.I have been there and survived.
:wave
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Old 06-06-2003, 08:08 AM   #19
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The clock

The first scene sets it up. He watches the clock as it marches towards the last seconds of his "organized" life. When I saw it, I was reminded of alot of people I know; the "I wish I", the "what if's", the if I had to re-do's... The ones always waiting for a kick in the pants, like retirement, or the kids to be out of school or moved out, or... Next thing they know, they are at that crossroad and don't know where to start or in no shape to do so. They buy that dream seaker, the big motorhome, just to find that that means living in very close quarters with someone you don't really know except as a service provider, care giver, organizer, etc...

One more thing that hits especially executives upon retirement: At the office, they are the King, the Boss. In the Home, the wife is the Queen, the Boss... Big shock to go from royalty to subject... To be the "go to guy" and become the "honey, where is the, or how do you", guy... Get up in the morning with no particular place to go...
And you happen to loose that "guide" through this new episode, you are left alone if you've lived life the way Schmidt did.

That is why you need to have hobbies, activities, friends, interests and passions as you go through life and maintain a "special" relationship with your spouse and anyone special in your life, more than a "Housewife", a "husband", "father", "mother", etc. Experience new things together, keep it fresh, but make sure you keep your individuality, do not melt into the other completely, so as to survive in the event that wonderful important part of you moves on before you do.

I am a firm believer that Quality is much better than quantity. I'd rather skip the overtime when it is not absolutely necessary to the running of the operation, to have those extra hours with loved ones or to keep the apointment I made with myself; a plan to do something neat today, tonite or this weekend.
Unless I win a lottery, I will not be leaving my children with great amounts of money when I leave this earth. But, I can assure you that I will leave them a wealth of souvenirs, experiences, discipline and the means to bite into life with passion. The love of Nature, the outdoors and great desire to fill that sponge of curiousity; lots to see, lots to do... JD
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Old 06-06-2003, 02:38 PM   #20
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now I have a dilemma.
I thought I'll probably like this one as Pam does.
then Ken says it's depressing. I hate depressing
Guess I see it and make my own assessment.

after JD's words, I thought of when my kids were young, I couldn't wait until they could be left alone if even for an hour. now I wonder why? spent half my life waiting for something. at least I solved that problem early on.
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Old 06-06-2003, 11:59 PM   #21
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slowing down

schmidt sounds good to me will see it on video soon.last fall i quit my 40 or more hours a week truck driving jog.new owners took a perfectly enjoyable job and cut benifits and pay and said take it or leave.so after 18 years i left.toke a job driving a school bus work 25 hours a week .those kids keep me in stitches all day.anyway i had to take a job at dominos twice a week to pay off my golf habit.worked my last day there yesterday told them i wanted the summer off to watch my girls.packed the trailer after work and goin to turkey run in indiana this weekend.my girls wanted to stay home and play .tuff youl go and like it.thats what my dad always told us and he was right.so well see how it goes just the three of us.
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Old 06-07-2003, 07:33 AM   #22
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about schmidt

I liked the movie as entertainment.

It might have been neat to have Nicholson -during his transition to retirement - flash back to his youth and show clips from Easy Rider:cool . That could have then been his impetus for hitting the road as a retiree.

I loved his future son in laws diploma: Congratulations on two weeks of perfect attendance.:reyes
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Old 06-07-2003, 11:23 AM   #23
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Okay... this is a test.... We have two kids graduating this weekend. We have 13 houseguests right now and are expecting 75 for dinner today. After everyone leaves, we are all sitting down to watch About Schmidt. My inlaws have seen it and loved it. So I'll let you know what the gang thinks tonight -- ages 10 through 78.

Nancy
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Old 06-08-2003, 11:44 AM   #24
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Okay... here are the results from the dozen or so people who watched the movie last night. It was about 50/50 in favor and against the movie. My husband and I liked it -- laughed and groaned all the way through it. My mother hated it -- I think it hit a little too close to home. :/

Nancy
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Old 06-08-2003, 12:24 PM   #25
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Okay! That confirms it, I'm dense as granite! Will someone please point out ONE SINGLE scene that was funny in that film???? To me there was nothing funny about pitiful old Schmidt not being prepared for retirement - many are not. I did not find it funny that he discovered he could not run a home - not many men can. Where was the humor in finding out his best friend had an affair with his wife earlier in life? That scene in the campground where he mistakes friendship for an advance was very uncomfortable and anything but funny. He simply looked like a lecherous old man that thought he saw an opening and was wrong. The warped relationship with the daughter was not uplifting. The hottub scene made everyone uncomfortable except Kathy Bates. The whole movie was sad and pointless from this chair.

Somebody clue me in.

P.S. Di wants to know this as well.
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Old 06-08-2003, 03:47 PM   #26
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We saw it at the movies with another couple. Our friend stepped out early- for a smoke, 'before the story got going', so he'd be back for the interesting stuff. He must have missed it - he didn't ever find it and Norm wished he'd gone out too and stayed out. She found it 'poignmant' and laughed frequently. I found it sad and I felt quite uncomfortable for Schmidt. We had expected it to be like the previews-quite funny.
So we're with Ken and Di.
Jean
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Old 06-09-2003, 09:37 AM   #27
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I think it's all in how one reacts to things. My husband and I laughed because so much of it sounded like our parents and some of it sounds like us already.

Nancy
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Old 06-09-2003, 10:14 AM   #28
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I think we often laugh to cover the things that would make us uncomfortable if we weren't laughing about it. I've not seen this movie, nor do I intend to. But, it sounds as though it's a 90 minute collection of tragedy -- lost opportunities, warped values, broken relationships and wasted lives. I'd probably cry, just as I'm inclined to do as I watch some of the people who surround me every day. When we spend our lives focused on ourselves, this movie is the natural outcome. If we instead focus on what we are created to be, life will be so much more! I'm not sure this forum is the place for what some would surely see as proselytizing, so I'll refrain, but I believe most people are really missing out.
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