Air Compressor Recommendations? - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-16-2007, 08:57 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Patrick M.'s Avatar
 
Name: Patrick
Trailer: 2007 Casita Liberty (Sold 2011)/ Honda Odyssey
Arizona
Posts: 705
After 40 years of owning a car, and 35 years of owning a house, and three months of owning a Casita with its 50psi (someday 65psi) tires, I decided it's time to buy a real air compressor to replace the tank I lug to the gas station to fill up, and the loud/slow 12v pump I have. I don't need a big one, but do want one that will run a nail gun for future projects, and I once read that oil-lubed ones are better/quieter. Saw this one today at Sears/KMart for $99. http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_0...s&adCell=A3

Recommendations? Suggestions?

BTW, the reviews on the Sears website for this compressor are less than encouraging.
Attached Images
 
__________________

__________________
Patrick M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2007, 09:06 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Joe MacDonald's Avatar
 
Trailer: Trillium
Ontario
Posts: 753
the only thing I would comment on, is that I have a coleman direct drive compressor, and it is extremely loud. try the compressor in the store first and make sure the noise level is ok.
Joe
__________________

__________________
Joe MacDonald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2007, 12:01 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Brian B-P's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: Boler (B1700RGH) 1979
Alberta
Posts: 5,000
As with any technical purchase, checking the specifications is important. While portable air compressors have traditionally featured a horsepower rating prominently, that's the one spec to completely ignore; the ratings have been entirely fictional, and now - after a class-action lawsuit - they are a confusing mix of real "running" horsepower and fictional "peak" horsepower. Instead of the alleged power of the motor, compare on the rate of compressed air delivered, which is expressed in cubic feet per minute (often listed as CFM, but should be standard cubic feet per minute, or SCFM) at a specified pressure... and you can only meaningfully compare the rates for two compressors at the same pressure.

The idea is to look at the consumption of the intended tool (in this case, a nail gun), at least match the compressor output to the average air consumption of the tools, and have enough tank to smooth out the bursts of demand... and keep the compressor from coming on every time you hit the tool's trigger.

In serious air compressors, multi-stage compression is a valuable feature. In the size most of us would consider, they're all single stage so it won't matter. Two cylinders does not mean two stage.

Speaking of size, the biggest home compressors will need to be the only thing on the electrical circuit (which may not be practical for many people), and anything a working shop would use probably needs 230V or even three-phase power... supplying that is probably a lot more trouble than it's worth, since even a very small unit can handle a nail gun well enough.

Many compressors come as a kit with a starter set of hoses, fittings, and tools, and maybe that's a handy thing and a good value. On the other hand, how cheap is the compressor to hit the overall price, and how bad are the tools?

That meaningful specifications for that particular Sears unit are 2.4 SCFM @ 90 PSI, and a 3 gallon tank. It's hard to find anything less capable, but it is so inexpensive that if it will do the job and won't be worked very hard, it may be a good deal. Customers who bought this to work it continuously for days on end are foolish, and have no basis for their whining reviews; what did they think they would get for pocket change?
__________________
1979 Boler B1700RGH, pulled by 2004 Toyota Sienna LE 2WD
Information is good. Lack of information is not so good, but misinformation is much worse. Check facts, and apply common sense liberally.
STATUS: No longer active in forum.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2007, 12:22 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Joe Z's Avatar
 
Trailer: Casita
New River AZ
Posts: 1,043
Patrick.....
That compressor looks like one of those vibrating kind of compressors....... they are very loud and annoying.
try to find one that has an electric motor and a belt thats hooked it to a separate compressor. i have a campbell hausfeld 5 hp 20 gallon tank and it does just about everything i need around a household garage.....read the SCFM@90lbs on the tank and then look at the tools you want to run for the SCFM needed (marked on the side of the tool) and that should get you pretty close to what you want...... If the tool has a higher SCFM than the tank it will probably still work but you may have to just wait a few minutes for the tank to recover when the tank runs down (which is no big deal if your not in a hurry...... by the way sears makes many good compressors that don't run on vibration...... pistons with a separate compressor is a good way to go but may cost you just a little more.
Joe
__________________
Joe and Linda
2013 Casita SD
Dodge Ram 4x4
Joe Z is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2007, 01:55 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Byron Kinnaman's Avatar
 
Name: Byron
Trailer: 2006 Scamp 13' towed with a 2005 Dodge Dakota 4.7l Magnum W/full tow package (over kill)
Oregon
Posts: 6,316
Registry
I bought a small off brand compressor with specifications about the same as the Sear model. For what I need it's plenty. Yes, it's a bit noisy.

Noise?.. I only run it when I need too, which at this time of the year is two or three times a week. It's no more noisy than many of my other shop tools and dust collection.
What I do with it? -- Tire inflation is one thing. Works very well. I also use it for air brushing. This time of the year when making Christmas presents, I spray on a top finish on carving and wooden gifts. I don't intend to do a lot of heavy mechanical work. No need to run and impact wrench, a large nail gun, a hand grinder, etc. A large piston air compressor wouldn't be worth the extra cost, floor space, electricity to run, etc. I bought the off brand because it cheap and I knew my usage was small.

So consider what you're going to use it for.
__________________
Byron & Anne enjoying the everyday Saturday thing.
Byron Kinnaman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2007, 03:50 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
pjanits's Avatar
 
Name: Pete
Trailer: 17 ft 1986 Burro
Tennessee
Posts: 881
When mine died during a air hammering removal of ceramic tile in the front hall ( yes it works really well for that) I bought one from Home depot similar to the Sears one.
I use it for everything I can get an air tool for.

Love it!
__________________
pjanits is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2007, 06:45 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Name: Darwin
Trailer: 2002 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Posts: 3,029
Send a message via Yahoo to Darwin Maring
We built our house ourselves and I had a large tank compressor for that however after the house was completed it got to be a chore to move around to do other things.

I purchased a portable Husky that has wheels and a suitcase type of handle that extends so you can wheel it around and another handle where you can just pick it up and I use it for all sorts of things like filling up a tire (Inside tank holds enough air to top off a tire or fill a golf cart tire) and I also use it to run the finish nailer, brad and stapler that we use in completing the trim work in the basement. It is small enough to take along on camping trips.

Husky Model "Easy Air" 1.75 gal and it sold new for less than $85 see the following site:
http://www.beletti.com/ram/aircompressor.htm

They have a new model that is sold at Home Depot for $99.99 at the following site:
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores...25X-_-100536065

I also saw them on EBay for a buy it now price of $50.
__________________
Darwin Maring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2007, 08:59 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Bob H's Avatar
 
Trailer: 1983 Scamp 13 ft Standard
Posts: 359
Back when I had more money than sense I bought a air compressor... one of my smarter purchases.

Lowes was selling a Delta, 8 Gallon, 2 HP, portable, with 125 psi. capacity for $150. (Circa 2002).

Mine came with extras... a 1/2" Impact wrench, 3/8" ratchet, a paint sprayer, along with hose & connector do-dads. To date, I've never used the paint sprayer, but I've used everything else quite a bunch. I bought additional tools like an air drill, brad nailer, palm nailer, a GOOD tire inflator, and I had aquired two old roofing staplers & nailers as well.

The drill and palm nailer built my tool shed porch, I'll use the roofing staplers someday when the roof needs work, otherwise the real workhouse has been the air ratchet. The little brad nailer, a cheapie from Homier Tools, is great for light, hobby work.

Expect noise when you charge up the tank. My compressor runs for about 5 minutes before it shuts off. It is a racket. But with the 8 gallon tank charged up I can turn quite a few bolts & nuts before the compressor has to recharge the tank. The ratchet is rated for 65-90 psi. I usually set the regulator to supply 75 psi. & let her rip. When done I bleed off the tank before I call it quits. ALways bleed it off and drain any moisture. A drop of oil in the tool you use before you use it will keep it workin' "long-time".

As with anything, know what you're gonna use it for before you buy. Get a big unit, otherwise you'll hear that noisy motor more than you'd like. But if you just want to fix the lawn mower & turn the occasional nut, a smaller unit is the ticket.

BTW, look real hard at how well made the BRASS air fittings are made on any prospective purchase, it's a mallable metal and can fracture over time & repeated pressurizing cycles. I speak from experience, this weekend I've noticed a tiny crack on the fitting between my tank and the regulator. It bubbles under pressure and I need to replace it, SOONER than later. Actually, it's had quite a good service life after 5 years and several hundred hours of use, but if I don't correct it, the thing can fail & blow apart on me at the worse time...like when I'm standing next to it.

"Shop Smart, Shop S-Mart"
ConwayBob
__________________
Check out my Scamp restoration video on Youtube, & my Ham Radio Blog. Or take the 50 cent tour...
Bob H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2007, 10:09 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Patrick M.'s Avatar
 
Name: Patrick
Trailer: 2007 Casita Liberty (Sold 2011)/ Honda Odyssey
Arizona
Posts: 705
Thanks for all the advice. For some reason I wasn't getting email notifications of postings to this thread, so I thought no one had any advice - little did I know until I checked it directly.

That Sears one comes with a cheap hose and basic inflation fittings. I think its a regular motor compressor, and not a vibrator but will check on that. Will also do the Home Depot - Lowe's - Costco rounds (from home) and see what they have for my $100 target.

I see Lowe's has this 1-gallon, oil-free kit for $79. No CFM or pressure rating given. http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=prod...&lpage=none
Attached Thumbnails
017565227490.jpg  
__________________
Patrick M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2007, 05:26 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Patrick M.'s Avatar
 
Name: Patrick
Trailer: 2007 Casita Liberty (Sold 2011)/ Honda Odyssey
Arizona
Posts: 705
So I bought the Sears $99 one as shown in post #1. It seems to be well-built. Built up pressure in the 3 gallon tank in less than a minute. Auto-shut off worked. It has a 50% Duty Cycle (no more than 30 minutes per hour),

The manual recommends draining the air out of the tank after using it. Is that really necessary? I hate to waste energy!
__________________
Patrick M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2007, 06:19 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Joe Z's Avatar
 
Trailer: Casita
New River AZ
Posts: 1,043
I never drain mine (others do which is a good thing)....... What happens is water (very very little) could condensate on the bottom and if you where spraying paint it could get a small drop or two in your work or in your air tools which could be remedied by a few drops of tool oil in your tool once in a while. You could just do a quick check and open the valve up on the bottom of the tank for a second or two and that will let you know if you have water in the tank because the water settles to the bottom.....then just close it.....done. I don't even do that and it's fine for me(others drain frequently)......... if you do alot of paint spraying and you need a perfect finish you could get a water separator put in line.....my tank holds air for weeks and weeks at a time.
Joe
__________________
Joe and Linda
2013 Casita SD
Dodge Ram 4x4
Joe Z is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2007, 05:14 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Name: Darwin
Trailer: 2002 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Posts: 3,029
Send a message via Yahoo to Darwin Maring
Should you want to spray paint, you can purchase an inline water separator for practically nothing from Northern Tools and/or Harbor freight.

Not draining the water from the tank from time to time could lead to rust holes developing inside the tank. My guess is that the compressor will give out way before any holes develop anyway.
__________________
Darwin Maring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2007, 05:27 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Patrick M.'s Avatar
 
Name: Patrick
Trailer: 2007 Casita Liberty (Sold 2011)/ Honda Odyssey
Arizona
Posts: 705
I happened to be at Harbor Freight today. They have lots of compressors and accessories. (I picked up a bigger hose using a coupon.) They had a much larger compressor for $99 but I decided for my use the smaller one I got at Sears would be just fine, although the 3-gal tank is somewhat small. I also noticed Costco had a bigger one with all the usual air tools for $200.

Thanks for the advice. I'll drain the air periodically.
__________________
Patrick M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2008, 01:17 PM   #14
Member
 
Trailer: 2003 Casita Spirit Deluxe 17 ft
Posts: 61
I saw this Campbell Hausfeld recall and immediately thought of this thread.

I've been eyeing a Campbell Hausfelk kit over at Costco . It comes with some hand tools that I don't need - but as I own no air tools I can see use for the nail gun, sprayer, impact wrench, air guage, etc. I thought it was $200 in the store, but could be mistaken.

-Kyle
__________________

__________________
Kyle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
12 volt air compressor william russell Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 11 04-09-2008 07:13 PM
Portable compressor recommendations? V'sGlassSleeper Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 26 09-26-2007 09:51 PM
new compressor fridge Joe MacDonald General Chat 2 02-15-2006 02:38 PM
Compressor Refrigerator Pete Dumbleton Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 4 11-18-2005 10:17 AM
Air Compressor Recommendations? Patrick M. Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.