All-carbon fiber travel trailer - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-15-2014, 10:30 PM   #15
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Ouch. I wondered where Subaru went.
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Old 03-15-2014, 10:42 PM   #16
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Ouch. I wondered where Subaru went.
Oh its still in the driveway.... as I wasn't totally convinced when I purchased my new tug that I was going to be overly happy with its performance this winter.... plus another member of the household was in need of slight upgrade in their commuter wheels... I still luv my Subaru!
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Old 03-16-2014, 04:55 PM   #17
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Great idea! The ultra light concept taken to the space age limit.
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Old 03-18-2014, 07:16 AM   #18
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One advantage I can see of having a carbon body shell on a trailer is that if you backed it into something your not likely to see the same level of damage you see doing the same with a fiberglass trailer!
That would only be true if the extra unit strength of the carbon was used to increase overall body strength and not reduce its weight. In practice most thin-carbon-skin (so this does not include bicycles, which are thick-wall carbon) structures are actually more prone to light damage, because the skins are thinner.

In many ways, the ideal trailer body material would be less strong, lighter and cheaper than molded fiberglass, so that the body could be made 1/2"-3/4" thick and so very strong (overall) and very rigid. The Royalex plastic that has been shown here might be one example, but then it needs very expensive molds to make it, so that pushes the price up.
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Old 03-19-2014, 05:06 PM   #19
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This sounds like the Nest with Monocoque Body

Located in Qatar "“I realized that I can build these trailers here and ship them back to the states at a prices that is reasonable for dealers and affordable for consumers,” he told RV Daily Report. “It’s not going to be a $60,000 trailer."

Crowd sourced for funding right now but the youtube render is fun to check out next-generation-rv
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Old 03-19-2014, 08:55 PM   #20
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Now if the chassis or frame of the trailer could be made of carbon fiber rather than steel, that would be a big advantage, both for weight & rust.
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Old 03-30-2014, 11:53 AM   #21
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I thought about building a carbo trailer on an aluminum chassis.
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Old 03-30-2014, 03:08 PM   #22
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I thought about building a carbo trailer on an aluminum chassis.
Whatever you do, don't put helium in the tires.
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Old 03-30-2014, 03:30 PM   #23
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I am curious how much weight could be saved on a trailer in the 15-19' range like our eggs?! The price premium over fiberglass would probably be more modest than in a large one like in that article. CF is amazing when done right. But to really see it's full advantage you need to do a lot of complex design work (aircraft and automobiles using it have considerable computer modeling to maximize strength). And the best CF structures of any complexity in size are very labor intensive and require baking in large ovens, often with complex techniques to apply pressure/vacuum.

Not cheap material or production processes. But it's gotten dramatically cheaper and more practical over the past 20 years. We shall see where it goes!
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Old 03-30-2014, 03:47 PM   #24
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Still not going near carbon fiber bars; worse than aluminum for breaking on a scored line!
jack
For sure scoring on a carbon bar will weaken it and is a safety issue. I have one here that someone else ruined and I will not use it.

On the other hand I installed a Monkey Lite carbon bar on my Trek Fuel 98 when I bought the bike in 02. After about 50 hard races and 100's of tough, rough rides the bars are like new.
Note the aluminum rims, frame, front fork, and XTR derailleurs, on the same bike have not stood up and have all been replaced over the years.

The carbon trailer is interesting but really wonder how practical it is. Do we really need such a high performance product in a place where it is not really needed.
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Old 03-30-2014, 04:34 PM   #25
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I suspect for most cases a larger tow vehicle will be MUCH cheaper than a lighter CF trailer. It doesn't make sense to me for a trailer that's going to be big and heavy no matter how light the chassis and body are. For a small trailer where a small efficient TV is desired, it may make sense at some point.

If I could make a 3000lb trailer weigh 2200lbs and only cost $10,000 more than fiberglass?? That's when it starts making sense to me.
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Old 03-30-2014, 05:47 PM   #26
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It would be a niche market, just as we are, only smaller.
Consider how many stick-built trailers are sold compared to FG.
Now take a fraction of the FG market and that's your market for more expensive carbon fibre trailer.
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Old 03-30-2014, 06:38 PM   #27
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Wow, the BS is getting thick and deep here!
The Egg.
Fiberglass and carbon fiber are more similar than different. Glass is like a sponge, when wetting it out it readily soaks up the resin, significant voids can be eliminated by hand. Carbon is much more "resinphobic", structurally problematic voids are tough to avoid without some sort of pressure, IE. vacuum bagging. This becomes tricky with big, curvy things like an egg.
Structures of similar thickness will be similar in strength but, carbon will be significantly lighter. My guess is that a carbon egg would break just like a glass egg (and could be repaired, with glass, at any autobody shop, just like your glass egg).
Comparisons to bikes are irrelevant. Bikes, frames and components, are replacing aluminum with carbon in load bearing structural parts. Nothing like replacing glass with carbon in the shell of an egg.
The Frame.
This more like a bike; possible but way more involved and expensive.

I work with both carbon and glass, daily, for a living.
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Old 03-30-2014, 07:18 PM   #28
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Ain't always the house that's too heavy; sometimes it's the contents. Remember Lucy's souvenir rocks? To travel lite you have to leave something behind. And as Dylan says, a bigger gas hog can solve as many problems as an acre of prepreg. Got rid of my 05 6cyl runner this week. Replaced with an 09 GX 470 v8, genuine mahogany and cow inside, and it's black like a Bentley, a Roller or a hearse. Is this livin or what!

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