All Electric Egg Camper - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-24-2008, 03:25 PM   #15
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One consideration I have for our campers is that we're able to live off the grid for a matter of days should a natural disaster strike. More and more in the past couple of years that seems like not such a bad idea. Propane for heating and cooking under those circumstances is a good thing.

Roger
What happens when your Propane runs out?
Most natural disasters last more then 2 days.

Hope you have solar for Battery power regeneration, and wood for cooking!
If there is a natural disaster, say good-by to Gas and Propane.

Mike
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Old 03-24-2008, 03:33 PM   #16
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The current for a 12VDC device really doesn't matter if the device is ultimately powered by a connection to shore power.

It's only when it's powered by a couple of batteries or a small solar system that it makes a difference. Same would be true for a 120VAC heater powered by inverter fed by batteries.

After shore power, the best way to produce heat is generally LP. I have electric stove/range at home, but wish it were propane (but not enough to spend the $$ to change it out.

Christi, you would be disappointed by 12VDC mode of 'fridge. Typical RV fridge works best on LP, second best on 120VAC and worst on 12VDC. The DC mode appears to have been designed only to keep the unit cool when driving, after which it would be switched to LP or shore power.
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Old 03-24-2008, 05:34 PM   #17
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What happens when your Propane runs out?
Most natural disasters last more then 2 days.

Hope you have solar for Battery power regeneration, and wood for cooking!
If there is a natural disaster, say good buy to Gas and Propane.

Mike

Actually, Mike, you'll likely run out of fresh water before you run out of propane. I used to live full-time in a 23' Airstream with forty pounds of propane in two tanks. Heating with propane in the winter with 25* days in the mountains, my tanks would last about 10 days. My Bigfoot 25' carries forty pounds of propane. My mini-motorhome carries about 35 lbs. A 15 lb tank on a gas grill will go for a very long time. Water, on the other hand, might be a much more precious commodity, depending on the size of your fresh water tanks and your useage. The point, however, is that for as long as your supplies last, you can continue being self-sufficient and out of the weather at least for a few days; typically long enough for disaster relief to reach you, anyway. Sanitation, sleeping arrangements out of the weather, and a way to prepare food are important during a crisis where normal life is disrupted. Lots of folks in San Diego County lived in their RVs for the duration of the fire evactuations, for example.

Roger
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Old 03-24-2008, 05:52 PM   #18
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Quote:
What happens when your Propane runs out?
Most natural disasters last more then 2 days.
I have "Boondocked" on two separate weekends within the last month where I was running my:
  1. Stove
  2. Heater (continuous running all night)
  3. Water Heater
  4. Refrigerator
... all on propane. That's been 4 nights and 6 days total on less than one 20 lb tank; and I have 2 tanks on the front of the trailer. I am confident I could run for 2 weeks on 2 tanks of propane.
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Old 03-24-2008, 05:54 PM   #19
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Actually, Mike, you'll likely run out of fresh water before you run out of propane. I used to live full-time in a 23' Airstream with forty pounds of propane in two tanks. Heating with propane in the winter with 25* days in the mountains, my tanks would last about 10 days. My Bigfoot 25' carries forty pounds of propane. My mini-motorhome carries about 35 lbs. A 15 lb tank on a gas grill will go for a very long time. Water, on the other hand, might be a much more precious commodity, depending on the size of your fresh water tanks and your useage. The point, however, is that for as long as your supplies last, you can continue being self-sufficient and out of the weather at least for a few days; typically long enough for disaster relief to reach you, anyway. Sanitation, sleeping arrangements out of the weather, and a way to prepare food are important during a crisis where normal life is disrupted. Lots of folks in San Diego County lived in their RVs for the duration of the fire evactuations, for example.

Roger
Roger,
I agree 100%. What I was trying to imply was that during a natural disaster, it's not only GRID people that will suffer. The lines to get to the gas/propane stations could be over a mile long, and that's if it's still available. I chose not to put in propane because it is an unstable gas, I know someone who lost their life from it in a camping incident, and in MN, we have two houses blow up this winter because of it.

So no, Propane in not the cat's meow for everything. But yes, it does have it's positives (I guess).

Mike
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Old 03-24-2008, 06:16 PM   #20
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Roger,
I agree 100%. What I was trying to imply was that during a natural disaster, it's not only GRID people that will suffer. The lines to get to the gas/propane stations could be over a mile long, and that's if it's still available. I chose not to put in propane because it is an unstable gas, I know someone who lost their life from it in a camping incident, and in MN, we have two houses blow up this winter because of it.

So no, Propane in not the cat's meow for everything. But yes, it does have it's positives (I guess).

Mike
It's one of those "makes the news" items. People get killed several times a day in automobile accidents, but we still drive. Something makes the news about a person getting hurt, then we better not ever do or use what ever hurt that person, still we drive our automobiles. A tree falls onto a house and destroys the house, local news. A gas leak causes a house to blow up, national news. Still we drive our automobiles.

More fires are caused by electrical problems than natural gas/propane and space heaters cause the greater number of house fires.

Propane is safer for cooking than many other heat sources. In fact the BSA (Boy Scouts) have banned white gas(Coleman Fuel) and alcohol stoves and use propane or butane stoves.

If you're uncomfortable using propane, that's fine. But be aware that some of the alternatives are more likely to cause problems than propane is.

During a natural or non-natural disaster I'll have enough propane to cook with for a couple weeks or more.

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Old 03-24-2008, 06:29 PM   #21
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It's one of those "makes the news" items. People get killed several times a day in automobile accidents, but we still drive. Something makes the news about a person getting hurt, then we better not ever do or use what ever hurt that person, still we drive our automobiles. A tree falls onto a house and destroys the house, local news. A gas leak causes a house to blow up, national news. Still we drive our automobiles.

More fires are caused by electrical problems than natural gas/propane and space heaters cause the greater number of house fires.

Propane is safer for cooking than many other heat sources. In fact the BSA (Boy Scouts) have banned white gas(Coleman Fuel) and alcohol stoves and use propane or butane stoves.

If you're uncomfortable using propane, that's fine. But be aware that some of the alternatives are more likely to cause problems than propane is.

During a natural or non-natural disaster I'll have enough propane to cook with for a couple weeks or more.
Am I detecting some anger ?
I'm not saying don't use it. I'm saying, I choose not too. At least with an electrical fire you have time to get out and get too safty, Propane, not so much.

I'm not trying to change what you do, or telling you what to do. I simply offered up some information on what I did with my boler and why.

Mike
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Old 03-24-2008, 06:45 PM   #22
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Everyone stay calm. And there's no need to reiterate your position.
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Old 03-24-2008, 07:02 PM   #23
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Am I detecting some anger ?
I'm not saying don't use it. I'm saying, I choose not too. At least with an electrical fire you have time to get out and get too safty, Propane, not so much.

I'm not trying to change what you do, or telling you what to do. I simply offered up some information on what I did with my boler and why.

Mike
NO NO!... No anger here.
Just pointing out that sometimes things aren't always as they appear at first blush. Also, that our news media will make things look a lot worse than reality and as a result we tend to make decisions based on that limited information. I had heard about the two houses where a gas leak caused them to blow up, national news. More houses were destroyed by wind than gas leaks. I'm just trying to point out that there's more than one way to look at things that might put us in danger.

For me, it's a matter of putting things into perspective. There are millions of RVs on the road, most have propane systems. If it was big problem it would be banned. Therefore, I have no problems with propane. I do have a propane detector, a smoke detector and a CO detector in my trailer.

If a person has a fear of such things, then by all means go with the fear. You'd never be able to enjoy a camping trip if you spent all your time worrying about the propane system. That's what it's really all about is enjoying the great outdoors. That's not meant to criticize you or anybody else, for that matter. So, enjoy your trailer!
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Old 03-24-2008, 07:14 PM   #24
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Mike has mentioned he lost a personal friend due to propane and that in itself, even if it was the only issue ever in history with it, would make me leery too.

I was hospitalized from an electric blanket malfunction once. I am fully aware that this was a fluke and very rare, however, to this day, I do not use one, and won't unless I am freezing to death and it's the only thing available. I do actually own one, it was a gift from someone who didn't know, but it has only been used once and not by me.

We need to get back to the practicalities of Cathy's original question. Which is, would you go all electric, and if not, why not?

It's a good question, but lets keep it to what works best for you and why. I am sure she can learn from our collective experiences and make her own decision.
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Old 03-24-2008, 07:22 PM   #25
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NO NO!... No anger here.
Just pointing out that sometimes things aren't always as they appear at first blush. Also, that our news media will make things look a lot worse than reality and as a result we tend to make decisions based on that limited information. I had heard about the two houses where a gas leak caused them to blow up, national news. More houses were destroyed by wind than gas leaks. I'm just trying to point out that there's more than one way to look at things that might put us in danger.

For me, it's a matter of putting things into perspective. There are millions of RVs on the road, most have propane systems. If it was big problem it would be banned. Therefore, I have no problems with propane. I do have a propane detector, a smoke detector and a CO detector in my trailer.

If a person has a fear of such things, then by all means go with the fear. You'd never be able to enjoy a camping trip if you spent all your time worrying about the propane system. That's what it's really all about is enjoying the great outdoors. That's not meant to criticize you or anybody else, for that matter. So, enjoy your trailer!
Few,
I'm glad, I was starting to think I had offended you in some way or another and that was defintely not my intent. Happy camping.
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Old 03-24-2008, 07:48 PM   #26
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Back to the original topic - the all electric egg camper. There was a very nice Trillium trailer nearby that we turned down because it was all electric. In the last 3 years we have camped extensively and not once have we been at a campground that was serviced. In British Columbia we have both unserviced Provincial Parks and unserviced Forestry Campgrounds and by far they are the nicest camping areas here.

That said, we likely won't be using the propane features extensively unless it gets cold enough to turn on the furnace - we will still be cooking outside on our coleman propane stove and using our good old propane lantern - in fact I have spoke to others who don't even use the fridge as they are pretty small and have to pack coolers anyways.

For us, the move to a trailer from our tents was due to my wife and I's 40 year old aches from lying on the ground and the lack of desire to do a daily setup and tear down of the tents when go campsite jumping on longer trips.
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:08 PM   #27
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And I on the other hand am always hooked up... or at least have been so far. I find for myself, I can be alone in a crowd. So, it's not them... it's me. I was going to pull all the propane out of my trailer, but figured since it's there... I'd just leave it. For that 1 in a million chance of needing it in a time of crisis. When it's cold, I use a cube heater rather than the propane. I mean, I've paid the campground for the services, might as well use it. I don't have a problem of using propane, at least not a fear. I've got Natural Gas appliances in my home... not much difference.

I feel fortunate to live in a beautiful state with beautiful parks. I know others aren't so fortunate.
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Old 03-24-2008, 09:04 PM   #28
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I am going all electric (120v and 12v) with the Play Pac. It came down to what type of camping I'm planning. While I will be attending festivals that don't have hookups, most will. I don't anticipate a lot of dry type camping, but will be able to do what I need with the portable grill and 1lb propane canisters. I don't intend to cook inside the trailer. If I do, it will using be a hotplate or a crock pot.

I guess my thought is, define what your style is then choose the camper fittings that fit.

I am investing in Solar to make the 'all electric' feasible. It's been a blast planning and plotting this adventure. I am, however, making sure I leave the option of adding propane later, if I so choose.

Heating, if it became a survival issue, could be done with vented windows and candles. During the '06 ice storm (10+ days of weather in the low teens and no power) I managed to keep my bathroom pipes from freezing with vented use of tealights candles. I used muffin tins in the shower or bathtub and kept the candles going 24/7. Both bathrooms stayed quite warm, almost hot. I didn't lose any plumbing and that was the objective.

I am coming from a primitive camping background and find myself hesitant about adding lots of extra 'stuff' to the PP. Not that I don't wonder what it will eventually look like. And I've certainly learned a thing or two watching and reading the exchanges on this board.

One of the absolute best pieces of advice I've seen is start camping and only add what you really want/need.
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