An All Electric Camper - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-01-2009, 09:53 AM   #15
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We bought an EggCamper from Jim Palmer this summer. The main reason we bought one is because they have four inches more head room and are eight inches wider than the 17' Casita or Scamp - this was important to me because I'm 6'4". My wife said the extra size, plus the all-white interior made the egg seem light and spacious - she said she felt like she was in a cave or a tunnel in the smaller units.

Jim said he hasn't sold a single propane camper all year! In our 43 years of marriage, my wife and I have only camped at established campgrounds that have had (at least) an electric connection, so all electric was a logical choice for us. We could always buy a small generator if we wanted to go off-grid for more than a couple of days, but don't envision that happening. Another consideration is if we ever head west from our home in Pensacola, we have to go through Mobile. The Mobile interstate tunnel doesn't allow any propane in it and we would have to go through the middle of town with our trailer. I don't know if all tunnels forbid propane, but Mobile is so close to us it's a consideration.
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Old 10-01-2009, 10:51 AM   #16
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Here's a view of the inside of the EggCamper. Very light and airy inside, even without the end windows.
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Old 10-01-2009, 10:52 AM   #17
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And a view from the other end.
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Old 10-02-2009, 07:35 AM   #18
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Hi Ray,

We've had our EggCamper for two summers now, and we love it. We're planning on attending the Sebring, FL rally in February 2010 with another EggCamper owner from Connectucut.

Ours is all electric, but we still cook outside in a screen room or under the awning with propane. It's very roomy and with the bed at the back, I think I prefer not having a rear window.

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Old 10-06-2009, 03:24 PM   #19
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Hi Ray,

We've had our EggCamper for two summers now, and we love it. We're planning on attending the Sebring, FL rally in February 2010 with another EggCamper owner from Connectucut.

Ours is all electric, but we still cook outside in a screen room or under the awning with propane. It's very roomy and with the bed at the back, I think I prefer not having a rear window.

Ron

Hi Ron F & Ray N. Thanks for your replies.

I had a long conversation with Jim at the beginning of the summer. The Egg Camper is on my short list for a number of reasons. It is light and airy inside and competitively priced.

Jim will build a propane version, but is very high on the all electric. So much so that you almost have to talk him into letting you purchase the propane version. He feels all electric is safer than propane, and as most dry campers will own a generator, propane is not needed.

Jim will charge several hundred $$$ more for the Propane version due to increased costs to accommodate for the propane.

However, I will be dry camping a great deal - for maybe 7 - 10 days at a time. Most of my trips will be during the winter months in Northern California. And the lack of propane does concern me. Based on your experience, if you knew that you were going to dry camp for several days at a time, would you still order the all electric version?

What is the heater like?

As an aside, I'm also a little disappointed that Jim does not wire the trailer for solar.

The other thing that I am worried about is the small refrigerator. I would like a lager freezer for frozen dinners.

What is your experience with the fridge?

Also, several Egg Camper owners previously posted that they had water leaks in the rear of their campers around the vertical running lights. Was that problem fixed by the manufacturers?

One more thing ... I do like the idea of the extra width. But ... how does the extra width and height affect gas milage on your tow vehicle? Do you have a comparison with Casita & Scamp for gas milage?

You continued input is much appreciated.

JMP


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Old 10-06-2009, 05:54 PM   #20
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Jim will build a propane version, but is very high on the all electric. So much so that you almost have to talk him into letting you purchase the propane version. He feels all electric is safer than propane, and as most dry campers will own a generator, propane is not needed.
When I read this, the thought comes to mind the perhaps one cannot (or will not want to) always run a generator when boondocking or dry camping? I'm thinking of the noise factor, mostly. What if you cannot run it all night, yet you still want to have a refrigerator/freezer or furnace running? Aren't there noise rules and or considerations? These things are silent to the rest of the world when run on propane.

Another thing I do not know about (but of course it would be possible to research), is how much energy you can store in the form of gasoline or diesel (for a generator) vs. in your typical pair of propane tanks. Is it comparable?

Each person has to decide what they are comfortable with, but I don't understand the "special" fear of propane, as compared to gasoline, electricity, or driving at 65 mph. They can all be deadly if one is not careful. Assuming that most small eggs use a gasoline generator.... there's nothing particularly safe and cozy about gasoline, if you have a problem.

None of this is to say that an individual should use any fuel (electricity, gasoline, or propane) that they are not comfortable with, of course.

Raya
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Old 10-06-2009, 06:40 PM   #21
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I thought I would add a little something to this topic. Last week we went on a 2 night trip up the North Shore in Minnesota for a color tour.. We knew it would be windy so what. We picked an electric site for watching tv-etc. The 2nd day boy it was windy. Trees in the campground came down. We lost power at 4:30 that afternoon and it was still off the next morning when we left. There were some poeple in a world of hurt because they didnt know how to use there propane furances. The temp was down in the 30's that night. You just never know what might happen. Bette

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Old 10-06-2009, 06:50 PM   #22
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Hi Jane,

Answers below.

Ron

Quote:
Hi Ron F & Ray N. Thanks for your replies.

I had a long conversation with Jim at the beginning of the summer. The Egg Camper is on my short list for a number of reasons. It is light and airy inside and competitively priced.

Jim will build a propane version, but is very high on the all electric. So much so that you almost have to talk him into letting you purchase the propane version. He feels all electric is safer than propane, and as most dry campers will own a generator, propane is not needed.

Jim will charge several hundred $$ more for the Propane version due to increased costs to accommodate for the propane.

However, I will be dry camping a great deal - for maybe 7 - 10 days at a time. Most of my trips will be during the winter months in Northern California. And the lack of propane does concern me. Based on your experience, if you knew that you were going to dry camp for several days at a time, would you still order the all electric version?

[b]If my plan was to be off grid for 7-10 days, then propane is definitely the way to go. Most of my camping will be with hookups.

What is the heater like?

[b]With hookups, the electric heater is adequate down into the 30's. I don't really camp in the winter. I haven't been far enough south with the Egg to need the A/C. Most of the camping up here is very comfortable without A/C.

As an aside, I'm also a little disappointed that Jim does not wire the trailer for solar.

[b]I think solar would be nice. Perhaps he will in the future. I'm planning on a couple of panels on the roof, similar to Peter H's rig.

The other thing that I am worried about is the small refrigerator. I would like a lager freezer for frozen dinners.

[b]The fridge is small, especially if you're planning tv dinners for meals. However, it is one of a very few that operate with a compressor, which makes it pretty efficient.

What is your experience with the fridge?

[b]Because it's efficient, it'll go a couple of days on the battery.

Also, several Egg Camper owners previously posted that they had water leaks in the rear of their campers around the vertical running lights. Was that problem fixed by the manufacturers?

[b]I had a leak around one of the clearance lights. It was easily fixed with silicon sealant. It may be something that Jim needs to look at in future models. I just fixed it myself.

One more thing ... I do like the idea of the extra width. But ... how does the extra width and height affect gas milage on your tow vehicle? Do you have a comparison with Casita & Scamp for gas milage?

[b]I can't speak for Casita & Scamp. I tow with a 2002 Toyota Sienna, with a 3.0 liter v6. It tows beautifully. The Sienna gets about 22 mpg without the Egg in tow. I haven't measured it with the Egg, but it doesn't seem alarming, at least not enough to motivate me to record mileage. I'm taking a trip this weekend, so I'll try to remember to make a note of the mileage.

You continued input is much appreciated.

JMP
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Old 10-07-2009, 11:30 AM   #23
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Quote query from Jane P

As an aside, I'm also a little disappointed that Jim does not wire the trailer for solar.


Jane

Adding wiring and a controller for solar would be very easy on the EggCamper. Power wiring could be run up the wall in the closet and through a port (sealed of course) in the roof. Compression sealed feedthroughs for wiring are cheap and easy to come by. The run would be fairly short to a controller mounted near the converter box. I'm planning on installing solar charging on my EggCamper after I complete the initial buildout but that's a bit in the future.

Maybe we could convince Jim to add solar panel pre-wiring to the list of options available on the EggCamper. I think the folks at Bigfoot and Oliver offered it as an option. It's just a matter of how much you want to pay.

73
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Old 10-08-2009, 09:41 AM   #24
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Driving the 1009 miles from Pensacola, FL to Grandville, MI without the trailer, our 4.3L S-10 averaged 21mpg. Coming back, WITH the EggCamper, we averaged 16mpg. I don't know how this would compare with other trailers, but we wouldn't trade the extra room for anything.

The battery will power the fridge, water pump, and lights for two or three days with no problem. If you used the microwave, AC, or heater, you'd be running out of juice real fast; however, you couldn't use the microwave or AC with propane either. We do most of our cooking with a Coleman stove outside anyway, so that isn't much of an issue. Because we live in Florida, we need AC more than we need a heater, so we never camp anywhere that doesn't have an electric hook-up available - at least for most of the year. If I lived "up north" and did much boondocking, I'd seriously consider the propane option.
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Old 10-08-2009, 04:23 PM   #25
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Driving the 1009 miles from Pensacola, FL to Grandville, MI without the trailer, our 4.3L S-10 averaged 21mpg. Coming back, WITH the EggCamper, we averaged 16mpg. I don't know how this would compare with other trailers, but we wouldn't trade the extra room for anything.

The battery will power the fridge, water pump, and lights for two or three days with no problem. If you used the microwave, AC, or heater, you'd be running out of juice real fast; however, you couldn't use the microwave or AC with propane either. We do most of our cooking with a Coleman stove outside anyway, so that isn't much of an issue. Because we live in Florida, we need AC more than we need a heater, so we never camp anywhere that doesn't have an electric hook-up available - at least for most of the year. If I lived "up north" and did much boondocking, I'd seriously consider the propane option.

Thanks again, Ron and Ray for your replies.

Ray, the difference of 5 gallons per mile is excellent. About what the Casita and Scamp people have reported. I'd be very interested to hear about other Egg Camper experiences.

If I'm in a situation where I will be using the AC & Microwave, I will need a compressor. I understand that I can't use everything (TV, Microwave & AC) at the same time. There is just so much juice that you can pull out of a compressor.

However, when I am off the grid, I would want a propane furnace for those cold mornings.

One more question -- comfort. I am an average size female and my husband is about 6 Ft tall.

But I am concerned about posts that describe the Egg Camper seats as very high off the floor and somewhat uncomfortable for females, like me, with average length legs. What is your experience?

Also, the pictures of fiber glass seats look uncomfortable. How comfortable are you and your wives' in the trailers with cushions, etc. What little time I spend in the trailer I'd like to enjoy and feel physically comfortable.

Once again, thanks for your thoughts.

Jane P.
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Old 10-09-2009, 10:30 AM   #26
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We bought our EggCamper without any cushions because we have a fair amount of experience making our own cushions for furniture. So far we have only used "bare" 4" thick foam for the seats and have only spent three nights camping, so our experience is somewhat limited. However, my 5' 8" tall wife just told me to tell you that the seats seem "fine" to her and was somewhat surprised that some people found them otherwise. We can't speak for someone much shorter than that, however.

By the way, Jim Palmer, the owner of EggCampers will tell you that you are under no obligation and will gladly give you back your deposit if, for any reason, you decide the EggCamper isn't for you once you actually see one. He realizes that most people have never actually seen one of his campers and that buying one sight unseen can be a scarry proposition. Rest assured, Jim is a great person to work with and will treat you fairly in this (and any) regard.

BTW, if any of you live near Pensacola, or come here on a vacation, I will be glad to show you ours.
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Old 10-09-2009, 10:52 AM   #27
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As far as wiring the EggCamper for solar, or the availability of many other options, you must remember that Jim Palmer runs a very small operation. He is basically retired from his former occupations and builds EggCampers as a hobby. He’s 6’3” tall and after once owning a Casita (I think), decided that tall people needed a trailer they didn’t have to stoop over in. I believe he only has three employees and uses his old auto body shop for his factory. If I remember correctly, he only builds trailers in the summers, and spends his winters in Arizona. He told me he only builds a trailer when someone orders one and basically runs a debt-free operation. He simply doesn’t build enough trailers to make a bunch of options feasible.

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Old 10-09-2009, 11:57 AM   #28
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An update on the seating height. After reading what you said about the seats being "high" my wife went out and sat in them again. Yes, they are quite high. She said that when turned "into" the trailer, her feet don't lay flat on the floor, when turned to face the table, however, they are flat on the raised area under the table.

Hope this helps.
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