An All Electric Camper - Fiberglass RV


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Old 09-28-2009, 01:41 AM   #1
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I just noticed the EggCampers seem to be all electric, how feasible would being all electric be? Would you have to be going from one campground with electric to another? Seems a little limiting to me.

http://www.eggcamper.com/

Are they still in production? They looked good, like the full beds. No, window in the rear was a negative, too bad they didn't at least put two small one back there if not able to do a long one.

Anyone have one here?
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Old 09-28-2009, 04:25 AM   #2
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They have a model that is all electric you can get Propane still. I believe they are still in production,
the fellow I bought my Burro from bought one this spring.
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Old 09-28-2009, 05:50 AM   #3
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I just noticed the EggCampers seem to be all electric, how feasible would being all electric be? Would you have to be going from one campground with electric to another? Seems a little limiting to me.
If you want to camp away from a power source, you'll need to haul a generator.
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Old 09-28-2009, 06:12 AM   #4
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Adrian,

I have the electric version of the EggCamper. I can go a couple of days off grid before I have to charge the battery. I replaced the incandescent lighting with LEDs so, the biggest draw is the fridge, which is very efficient. When off grid, I bring along a small propane stove for cooking. However, without plugging in, I do miss setting up the coffee pot the night before and having it come on automatically in the morning. For longer off-grid stays, I bring along my Honda 2000i. Long range, I'm planning on solar and leaving the Honda at home.

Overall the camper is light weight, very roomy and I don't miss a rear window.

I believe that Jim Palmer will still build you a propane version.

Ron
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Old 09-28-2009, 12:10 PM   #5
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Red face

! Ron wrote, "the camper is light weight, very roomy," that was the impression I got from the pic's & floor plan on their web site. Is the bed a full in size or larger? It appears, but not stated, as far I saw, you can get a bed which is a bed all the time. Is this correct?
Thanks!

Adrian
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Old 09-28-2009, 12:23 PM   #6
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We have only camped at electric. We have been able to go places that we would never have gone to before we bought our UHaul. We just like our luxuries, DVD, HDTV, air conditioning, computers, and even a chandelier made from a trouble light and beads . If we did not have the UHaul, I might be tempted by the electric Eggcamper. We do use propane to cook though, although mostly now, it is done outside.

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Old 09-28-2009, 02:34 PM   #7
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My only comment to something that is all electric and if you don't have the ability to recharge the batteries fully... like a generator. Is what would you do, if you CAN'T hookup and you absolutely need to use your trailer as a "shelter"? Such as those individuals that have used their trailers as homes away from homes during times of disaster. Would your food spoil and would you be able to stay warm and have cooked food?

Just thinking out loud here.
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Old 09-28-2009, 03:11 PM   #8
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Adrian,

You have to keep in mind that the refridgerator is 12 volts and it has a 12 volt water pump. So if you are camping without utilities you will have lights, refrig, and water. I use a propane grill/ gridle/ burner outside if not raining. Having said that, I want all the LUXURIES , A/C, heat, hot water, tv, dvd, satalite radio, etc. so the all electric works for us. I think it simplifies the camping experience, and I don't have the worries of a propane leak in the unit.

Art
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Old 09-28-2009, 03:12 PM   #9
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From another point of view, if you have a generator, then the camper wouldn't exactly be "all electric," since the generator would be powered by some other fuel.

I would think the only way "all electric" would be feasible would be if you plan to camp with electrical hookups all the time. I suppose you could have solar panels, but I don't think most people would be able to power all their appliances with them (you could, with a large enough array, don't get me wrong; or you could choose to ration your use of power). From reading here, it seems like there are a fair number of people who always camp with "shore power," so for them it seems feasible.

I find it to be a lot like boating, where it's best to have multiple sources of power (elec, LP, kerosene, etc), and appliances that are flexible. But that's just me and my style. I like to go places without shorepower, and I also like to stop enroute, at rest areas, Wal-Marts, or etc. where there are not plug-ins.

For emergency use, eating would not be as much of a concern to me as heat would (if in a cool climate). I would count on eating non-perishable foods (I'm used to no refrigeration, and it's amazing the number of foods we refrigerate that don't absolutely need it). Cooking would be nice, and would buoy the spirits, and one could use a camp stove (but of course that would not be electric).

To me, it seems to come down to how often you plan to use "shore power" electrical hook-ups, plain and simple. If 100% of the time, then all-electric is workable. If not 100% of the time, you either have to go without functions or introduce other fuel/power sources.
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Old 09-28-2009, 03:15 PM   #10
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Adrian,

, I do miss setting up the coffee pot the night before and having it come on automatically in the morning.
Ron
You mean you don't have to get up and put your feet on a cold floor to start the coffee?
Wow Luxury for sure.
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Old 09-28-2009, 06:56 PM   #11
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We replaced the stock matress (4" foam) with an innerspring mattress earlier this summer. The innerspring mattress was an inexpensive off the shelf full sized mattress from Mattress Giant. We have the layout with a permanent bed and small side dinette.

If you check out the modifications section of the forum, you can see photos of some of the mods that I've done to make use of spaces for storage.

Granted, that the way I camp is not "total electric" because, even when we have hookups, we cook outside, mostly with propane, although sometimes with a crock pot. Even off grid, I use the generator to charge the system. The fridge has a compressor, so it doesn't create cold like the 3-way units that are in propane trailers. The only time it's drawing from the battery is when the compressor runs, which this time of year isn't that often. Mid summer it cycles more often.

And to answer the other question; yes, coffee's ready in the morning, but I still have put my feet on the floor to go to the cupboard for a cup.

Ron
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Old 09-29-2009, 11:20 PM   #12
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Frankly, some people don't care to boondock. So an all Electric Trailer would work for them. And honestly if you have been in one you would consider it! They are so much bigger than say my Casita but not sticky big, glass big! The only thing I don't care for is no bathroom door, just a curtain other than that they are a cool option for a glass buyer.



We all camp differently, so for those who only care to camp in full service campgrounds the EggCamper is a sweet option.
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Old 09-30-2009, 11:53 AM   #13
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These are always interesting conversations. My input would be: "It depends." The reality is that different people go camping in different places, like doing different things and use their trailers in very very different ways. All electric makes a lot of sense to me - but the campgrounds in this area of the country are NEARLY all ALL electric and we only use the trailer for family activities in the summer. Honestly, I'd have a hard time finding a camping site around here that DIDN'T have an electric hook-up. The youth-group sites don't, but you're not going to be setting up someplace like that.

Other people are using theirs in more remote locations and in parks without any electric or in serious emergencies. To them - the electric doesn't makes much sense.

It's no different than any other product (cars, cameras, grills) - there's no single item and set of features that is the best for everybody under all circumstances It's hopeless to look for one and arrogant to think you have it. Figure out what you want it for, how you'll use it, figure out the features you need and/or want and go from there.

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Old 09-30-2009, 12:34 PM   #14
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