Bigfoot vs. Nash? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-19-2007, 05:26 PM   #1
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Hello, my husband and I are very close to making a decision on a travel trailer - we have an opportunity to buy a new 2007 Bigfoot - the 17.5 foot model - and have also been looking at a 2008 Nash trailer that is about the same weight, but is a little longer and about 6" narrower in width (this one has metal sides, not fiberglass). There is about a $6,000. difference in price and we are wondering if anyone could give us some advice about the difference in quality? In other words, do you think the Bigfoot is worth the price difference? We don't know what the maintenance is like for Fiberglass versus metal. We have never owned a travel trailer, but did have a truck camper in the past. My husband just retired and we are hoping to do some long distance traveling and to use the trailer often, so we want something that will be durable and comfortable, too. We do need the small size for the vehicle we are purchasing and we don't want something that will be difficult to tow or park. Any insight is greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
Cheri
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Old 10-19-2007, 06:03 PM   #2
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Hello, my husband and I are very close to making a decision on a travel trailer - we have an opportunity to buy a new 2007 Bigfoot - the 17.5 foot model - and have also been looking at a 2008 Nash trailer that is about the same weight, but is a little longer and about 6" narrower in width (this one has metal sides, not fiberglass). There is about a $6,000. difference in price and we are wondering if anyone could give us some advice about the difference in quality? In other words, do you think the Bigfoot is worth the price difference? We don't know what the maintenance is like for Fiberglass versus metal. We have never owned a travel trailer, but did have a truck camper in the past. My husband just retired and we are hoping to do some long distance traveling and to use the trailer often, so we want something that will be durable and comfortable, too. We do need the small size for the vehicle we are purchasing and we don't want something that will be difficult to tow or park. Any insight is greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
Cheri
Just curious ... Don't you and your husband find the sleeping arrangement in the 17.5 Bigfoot rather small?
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Old 10-19-2007, 06:12 PM   #3
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Just curious ... Don't you and your husband find the sleeping arrangement in the 17.5 Bigfoot rather small?
Yes - but he is skinny which helps! I am thinking we will manage. May have to sleep separately.
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Old 10-19-2007, 06:39 PM   #4
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Although the Nash has aluminum exterior panels, the more important part may be the structure which supports them. While the 2500-series Bigfoot trailers have bodies comprised of a moulded fiberglass shell with some interior structural assistance, the Nash structure is likely a glued sandwich of plywood around a foam core, with either studs inside of either wood or aluminum; the aluminum sheathing on the outside just keeps the weather out, and is not structural at all. In the better-known Arctic Fox line from the same manufacturer as Nash, some models have wood framing and some (the Silver Fox editions) have aluminum framing - all are glued sandwiches with a fiberglass outer layer on the plywood.

We generally like our moulded fiberglass trailers construction because they lack (or are at least not entirely dependent on) wooden body structure, and they have few seams to leak and lead to hidden internal damage due to rot or corrosion.
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Old 10-19-2007, 08:28 PM   #5
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We generally like our moulded fiberglass trailers construction because they lack (or are at least not entirely dependent on) wooden body structure, and they have few seams to leak and lead to hidden internal damage due to rot or corrosion.
Aluminum sheet exteriors will dent in hailstorms. Fiberglass won't.

Fiberglass trailers hold their value very well and tend not to depreciate nearly as much as trailers of more conventional construction. I'm not sure how the Nash trailers do in depreciation, but Bigfoot holds its value exceptionally well.

Roger
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Old 10-19-2007, 09:00 PM   #6
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Aluminum sheet exteriors will dent in hailstorms. Fiberglass won't.

Fiberglass trailers hold their value very well and tend not to depreciate nearly as much as trailers of more conventional construction. I'm not sure how the Nash trailers do in depreciation, but Bigfoot holds its value exceptionally well.

Roger
Thank you for the responses - what you are saying is helpful to us.
Cheri
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Old 10-21-2007, 10:48 PM   #7
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Thank you for the responses - what you are saying is helpful to us.
Cheri
Cheri:

I considered an Arctic Fox as an alternate to the Bigfoot. I was curious about the solar reflective storm windows that are supplied from Summerland, BC, for both the Bigfoot and AF. The company indicated that the Bigfoot windows are more reflective and considerably higher cost that ones for the Bigfoot. A small matter, but points to perhaps better quality materials. My new Bigfoot has the more expensive Whisper Quiet water pump.

FYI
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Old 10-21-2007, 11:26 PM   #8
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--><div class='quotemain'>I considered an Arctic Fox as an alternate to the Bigfoot. I was curious about the solar reflective storm windows that are supplied from Summerland, BC, for both the Bigfoot and AF. The company indicated that the Bigfoot windows are more reflective and considerably higher cost that ones for the Bigfoot. A small matter, but points to perhaps better quality materials. My new Bigfoot has the more expensive Whisper Quiet water pump.
FYI
Rick[/quote]
Hello, that is good information. Quality of materials isn't always visible. I'm not sure how anyone ever reaches a decsion with so many factors to consider. We have been working on a price with a dealer for a new 2007 Bigfoot, but it doesn't look like it is going to work out. What do you think about length of trailers? We were hoping to keep it at about 19 feet or less, but there is a model that is 20 ft. and 9 inches that I like (includes the tongue). John is worried about parking, towing, weight, etc. if we go up to that size. We will be getting a new Toyota Tacoma V6 with tow package next week - Tow rating is 6,500. If dry weight of trailer is about 3,800 would that be safe and doable? Any input/advice would help us. It seems like we have researched for so long. I am ready to start traveling!
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Old 10-22-2007, 01:11 PM   #9
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My vote would be to walk away from the Bigfoot if the dealer won’t meet your offer. If you go with a conventional trailer like the Nash I would vote for aluminum framed one as opposed to wood frame. Cikira is my personal favorite and have looked at them up close. http://www.cikirarv.com/ Let us know what you decide and good luck.
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Old 10-22-2007, 07:03 PM   #10
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Cheri... MY opinion... (and, of course, it's more valuable than MOST free advice, 'cause I'm the one giving it... ) is:

The 21' Bigfoot is a nice trailer, in both floorplans. But... (and there's always a "but"...) the 25' has a queen bed, and a large separate shower that a 6'5" person (like me) can stand in. The trailer is only 4' longer than the 21', and only a few pounds heavier than the 21', is within a few $$ of the cost of the 21' and yet has much more usable "move around" space. They both have tandem axles, and have the same appliances, insulation, windows, etc. etc. etc.

I can take my 25' anywhere a 21' can go. The double bed is difficult to make in the 21' (either model) because it has at least two sides against a wall. I actually have a full-sized 80" queen mattress in my 25' and I sleep better than I do at home (even though it's actually the same model/manufacturer's 11" visco foam mattress I have in both my bedroom AND trailer).

I also tow my 25' with my Tundra 3.4l V6, although the new Tundra's 4.0 with a 6500 lb tow rating would be much better suited to it. The "dry weight" you've gotten BTW on the 21' is pretty much the shell and frame. The "as equipped" weight is what's important, and most of the 21' trailers will weigh in pretty close to 4800 lbs. My 25' has an as-equipped weight of about 5300 lbs.

There are lots of Bigfoot dealers up and down the west coast. It may be well worth contacting at least a couple more of them for quotes.

So, you are now the proud recipient of all the wisdom I have to offer!

Happy hunting!

Roger
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Old 10-23-2007, 02:12 PM   #11
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My vote would be to walk away from the Bigfoot if the dealer won’t meet your offer. If you go with a conventional trailer like the Nash I would vote for aluminum framed one as opposed to wood frame. Cikira is my personal favorite and have looked at them up close. http://www.cikirarv.com/ Let us know what you decide and good luck.
Ken, we have been doing some research on the Cikira and it does look good - we have located a new 2007 model at a dealership that isn't too far from here and will probably go look at it on Thursday. Thank you for the suggestion!
Cheri and John
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