Boondocking in a natural disaster - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-27-2014, 04:02 PM   #1
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Boondocking in a natural disaster

Ever happen to you ? Betty and I were caught in a big storm on Lake Ouachita in Arkansas. Since then we have talked about how we might be better prepared, and we wonder how others would have responded to such a happening. Your input will be appreciated. Here is a link to the photos of us cutting our way out, a link to a video of the damage and a link to the Channel 11 news interview with us about the event.
Big Storm on the Lake ¬Ľ Oliver Travel Trailers
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Old 07-27-2014, 06:51 PM   #2
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I carry one of these. It folds so it doesn't take that much space, plus it could be used as a weapon.

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Old 07-27-2014, 08:02 PM   #3
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We also carry a folding saw though not the weapon of choice. Too close for an older couple.

We have become 'Mormon like' in our preparation.
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Old 07-27-2014, 09:04 PM   #4
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The folding saw looks like a good tool to have on board, but I don't think I could prepare for any and all eventualities. We always carry a little extra food and we could easily boondock on a moment's notice. If there were a flood I'd like to have one of these FGRVs. Sealander Amphibious RV Sealander - Schwimmcaravan - Grenzenlos mobil on Vimeo

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Old 07-27-2014, 09:14 PM   #5
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A friend of ours got trapped in an ice storm in Emporia Kansas for 3 days . The electric power was out in the area and he had to rely on the trailer's battery for power .After less than 2 days his battery was dead so he could not run any lights or any appliances .( Read Furnace) A solar battery charger would really come in handy in such an emergency
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Old 07-27-2014, 09:22 PM   #6
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Old 07-28-2014, 06:38 AM   #7
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I am not paranoid about it but we believe in being prepared because 'it' happens. In our lifetime 'the 100 year flood' has happened a number of times.

We do carry a million gallon water filter with us at all times, a gift.

In addition we have a significant backup food supply in our homes. Obviously our trailer can not carry a lot of food but in a pinch I think we could eat sparsely from our trailer for a couple of weeks. Ginny always has her emergency Spam supply, usually we have a couple of pounds of smoked salmon, and always beans for soup.

In reality it is not very expensive to be prepared for a few month long emergency.
Electrically our trailer is relatively well prepared for these issues with it's 80 watt solar panel. At home we have a small generator and a 120 watt solar panel.
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Old 07-28-2014, 08:14 AM   #8
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"I am not paranoid about it but we believe in being prepared because 'it' happens. In our lifetime 'the 100 year flood' has happened a number of times."

Darn Norm, I would have sworn you were in your early seventies!

In answer to the OP, living down close to the Gulf, we have had to bug out several times because major storms had us in their sights. Regardless of the damage we have suffered, one time really major, we always come back to no power, and many times to reduced water pressure or boil notices. In these situations, our camping experience and equipment is invaluable. In hurricane season, we are always prepared with extra food and water for about 2 weeks. Chainsaw and generator are primed and ready, with extra fuel on hand............and of course now we have our 'bug out' trailer.
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Old 07-28-2014, 08:30 AM   #9
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Cliff,


We'll be 72 in August, When I was mayor of a small time I remember the feds coming with their maps to show us the 100 year flood water line. In my lifetime that town had already had three 100 year floods.

We'll become more concerned about hurricanes when we own a building in FL though it has been 8 years since the last FL hurricane, a record for class 3 and above hurricanes. Hurricanes are not much of an issue in NH.
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Old 07-28-2014, 08:36 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by honda03842 View Post
I am not paranoid about it but we believe in being prepared because 'it' happens. In our lifetime 'the 100 year flood' has happened a number of times.

We do carry a million gallon water filter with us at all times, a gift.

In addition we have a significant backup food supply in our homes. Obviously our trailer can not carry a lot of food but in a pinch I think we could eat sparsely from our trailer for a couple of weeks. Ginny always has her emergency Spam supply, usually we have a couple of pounds of smoked salmon, and always beans for soup.

In reality it is not very expensive to be prepared for a few month long emergency.
Electrically our trailer is relatively well prepared for these issues with it's 80 watt solar panel. At home we have a small generator and a 120 watt solar panel.
Norm,
What is a million gallon water filter? Where can I get one of those filters?
thanks!
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Old 07-28-2014, 09:42 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huck View Post
I carry one of these. It folds so it doesn't take that much space, plus it could be used as a weapon.

I had a non folding version I used for trimming branches and cutting up firewood. It worked great but they change the blade design frequently so that you have to buy a whole new saw instead of replacement blades. I was just thinking about buying a new one to prune some trees. Maybe I'll try the folding version this time.
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Old 07-28-2014, 10:08 AM   #12
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Carl,

Sawyer Point ZeroTWO‚„Ę Bucket Purifier Assembly Kit | Sawyer

Here's the filter we have. It is designed for a gravity feed system, not for the input to a trailer. A life saving kind of device during bad conditions.

We also carry a life straw in our backpack.
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Old 07-28-2014, 11:27 AM   #13
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Being a Prepper, seems to be popular these days. It harkens back to early times hundreds and thousands of years ago where people had to be self sufficient. Now-a-days, it is more complicated because we don't raise our own food, we don't "can" foods to lay in a winter store. Store actually meant to store something, while today, stores are supply points for the populace that, in an emergency can fail since they are dependent on just-in-time inventory through the supply chain and transportation process--all of which can be interrupted in an emergency.

During Hurricane Irene, I went to check on my boat--which survived with some damage in an industrial area of Bridgeport. On the way home I decided to stop at McDonald's for a burger for my hungry dog. I noticed the drive through line was very long, so I parked and walked to the door. Just as I got there, they unlocked it. They had been closed until then. I walked up to the counter and as first in line placed my order for one plain double cheeseburger and a cup of water for my dog. I heard a huge commotion behind me. I turned around and there were 30 or more people in line behind me. Looking at the dejected looking faces, I realized that these people depended on McDonald's for food every day--food that I thought was fit for my dog in an emergency. McDonald's meals was their backup plan.

During Hurricane Sandy, Quebec Hydro came down with a fleet of trucks and workers to help restore power. It made me feel woinderful that our neighbors in Canada traveled so far to help out. However, the lowest elevations in Bridgeport were the last served because flood waters impeded work. This was also a poor neighborhood, exclusively black, and these people were throwing eggs at the volunteer utility workers from Canada. I was so embarrassed by this. Even worse, I later learned people were throwing rocks at the utility workers in Manhattan.

Living in Connecticut, near it's largest city, and going through two hurricanes in the last five years, I found it very troubling that so many people live hand to mouth, relying on government subsidies, and then are violent towards the very people who were trying to help them. I suppose going two days without TeleVision will do that to you. Imagine going three days without food. Give it a week and people will be eating each other.

On the other end of the spectrum, Preppers don't expect anyone at all to help them, and put aside money to stockpile (store) food, and fuel. They buy small generators to keep power going for a few lights, the furnace, a refrigerator and TV's. They also buy guns, because they don't want their preps to be ripped off by violent savages who feel they are entitled to take anything in an emergency, and they don't want to eat their neighbors.

The US government feels the same way, with executive orders that give the government power to take anything they like in an emergency--for the common good. It is the Christian thing to help others in need. But at some point it could mean starving yourself to help others, then we enter the shady area where survival conflicts with charitable giving.

So it seems that a camper with a Genset or solar, adequate batteries, and a supply of food is something small enough that it is less likely to be "commandeered" for the public good by the government and mobile enough to be kept (hidden) and used somewhere where an emergency can be ridden out safely. Or used to live in while waiting for an emergency to end.
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Old 07-28-2014, 12:03 PM   #14
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Conrad,

In a true emergency the problem does become the 'stone throwers' for emergency workers. It is amazing to me. This would be an atypical reaction in NH. Unfortunately the lack of civility can become very strong in short order in some locations.

I don't consider myself to be a prepper but I can understand those who are. Considering some of the trends it may be very wise. I understand that the Mormons have gone from one year supply recommendation to two years.

A small trailer makes a nice bugout vehicle. Without doing very much you can move into it in short order and equally be ready to go. In an hour we could be well stocked with food from the house and easily be able to live for 30 days without any store or utility requirements.
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