Bringing food for a Week - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-26-2007, 07:04 PM   #1
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The wife and I are leaving this Saturday, in our 13fto Boler Lady-Bug, for a stay at a campground for a week and today the wife asked me what we were going to bring for food.

In my younger days when I was an advid hiker I could cram 5 days worth of food into a container that was 5 by12 by 8 inches but I know her idea of oatmeal for breakfast every day and dried fruit and cheese and some cured meat for lunch and a pkg. of rice or noodles will not cut it for her so I was wondering what everyone else brings for extended stays out camping.

Maybe you all just go out to eat every meal or buy every meal daily. I would like to know.

My freezer at home is filled with all kinds of beef, pork and chicken and I may take some and hope that the cooler will keep things frozen till I use it.

My fridge and freezer work just fine but it is just too small for a weeks worth of food.

Gerry the canoebuilder
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Old 06-26-2007, 10:38 PM   #2
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Plug in the trailer to shore power, turn the fridge to appropriate power setting and chill it down before hand. Take a good quality cooler (your call as to size) and chill it down with pre frozen ice packs. When you plan to leave, load the cooler with other prefrozen food stuffs and load the trailers fridge accordingly. You might want to also take along some freezer packs in your cooler to re-freeze (IF you can) at your destination. Failing that when you get to your destination, buy ICE for the cooler. Keep the cooler closed as much as you can and try to leave the melted ice in there (if possible) because cold/cool water is a better refridgerant than air!!!
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Old 06-27-2007, 12:15 AM   #3
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Quote:
The wife and I are leaving this Saturday, in our 13fto Boler Lady-Bug, for a stay at a campground for a week and today the wife asked me what we were going to bring for food.
Gerry the canoebuilder
I do a lot of boondocking and everything that needs to be kept cool that I can freeze gets frozen in my deep freeze before I leave even the lunch meat. I have 3 well insulated coolers 2 for food an one just for extra ice.

I have been out for 8 or 9 days with no power and not had a problem with spoiled food and still had a few cool beers.

Enjoy your trip.
John
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Old 06-27-2007, 04:22 AM   #4
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I also pre-cool the frig and freeze whatever is appropriate. I start out with a nice supply of drinks in the frig, and then restock after the cool of the night. But mostly I try to keep the meals simple, and sometimes use canned meats. Running out of milk is my main problem. Well, that, and coming up with simple meals that actually taste good AND generate a minimum of dirty dishes. I don't like to bother with coolers and ice and such, but they might be necessary for more home-like cooking.

On one long backpacking trip years ago my husband talked me into bulgur and various freeze-dried meats for every dinner. It didn't weigh very much, but, UGH.
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Old 06-27-2007, 05:31 AM   #5
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On one long backpacking trip years ago my husband talked me into bulgur and various freeze-dried meats for every dinner. It didn't weigh very much, but, UGH.
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yea, I agree on that Freeze-Dried stuff
My hikeing buddy always took along one or two just to try and as I looked on his so called Gourmet Meal of meat/potato/vegi/ and even desert, eating my box of spiced up rice with some chunks of smoked meat in it for extra flavor, he would say..."Don't look so sad, your not missing much"

Once he even thew me some crumbs of his corn bread and he was right...ugh "no flavor and went down, with gulps of water, like sand-paper.

Guess the whole thing boils down to getting a better cooler.

The wife now owns an antique colman from back in the 60's and I been trying to get a newer one but she says "look how big they are and they are no bigger,even smaller inside then the one we got"

Can't make her understand the bulk is insulation to make it work.....
I guess I just have been home too long expecting a so called Sunday dinner every day of the week and have to get use to P/B/J sandwiches and water for lunches. ha ha ha.
Just kidding...I am hopeing the trout fishing will ge good enough for at least 4 or 5 meals

Gerry the canoebuilder
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Old 06-27-2007, 07:23 AM   #6
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When we got our Casita our kids gave us a 'Foodsaver' as a camper warming gift. It's great - . We plan most of our meals ahead and use the Foodsaver to vacum pack as much as possible - save a lot of space.


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Old 06-27-2007, 10:35 AM   #7
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There's ways to do things don't need a lot of "cooling" space. We do a lot of "one pot" meals.
Suggestions;
Study the prepared foods isle at your local store. Those things in boxes and bags.
Study the canned meats. You'd be surprised what's there.
Plan or semi plan your meals and look for ways to NOT take perishables.
Don't take loaves of bread, substitute tortitas. They take up less space and don't require refrigeration until opened.
Try to get stuff is containers small enough that you'll use it all when opened. Many things don't require refrigeration until open.


We have a 13' with the little refrigerator and find it has plenty of room. Breakfasts are usually pancakes or eggs with corned beef hash, scramble eggs with a canned ham and a couplle tortitas.

Lunchs are meat spread on tortitas, peanut butter on tortitas. String cheese or small cheeses. In cold weather a "cup of soup" will add that warm food.

Dinners are usually a box or bag meal with some added stuff.

One of great things about these small trailers is the similicity. Maybe meals need to be the same, simple and easy. Spend more time watching the birds, and the water roll over the rocks. Less time futzing with stuff.
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Old 06-27-2007, 11:50 AM   #8
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Byron- looked all over the grocery store and no one knew what tortitas were. Is that an Oregon thing?
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Old 06-27-2007, 11:58 AM   #9
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Lots of fruit and vegies (think the harder stuff like carrots and cabbage instead of lettuce; apples, oranges, melons instead of berries) will last a week with very little refrigeration. A cooler is great - or if you're near water, submerge a 'dry bag' with your perishables in the water.

We used to do this when kayaking - of course, the hold of a kayak on the ocean is near refrigerator temp anyway - we wrapped stuff in newspaper to keep the condensation down to prevent mold - cabbage, melons, and cheese would last over a week.

Cheese and eggs I trust for awhile in cool unrefrigerated conditions (organic ones last longer; farm fresh - where they haven't washed off all the natural coating last longest). For meat, I'd go with the advice on starting out with frozen or canned.

I use a high quality powdered milk and make it up as I need it. For cream in my coffee, I used canned. Not quite as good as fresh - but pretty darn close for camping.

It's harder if your travels take you out into the wilderness for the whole trip. Often, if I'm traveling between places in the summer, I'll restock fruit and vegies from farm stands - extremely yummy.
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Old 06-27-2007, 12:27 PM   #10
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Byron- looked all over the grocery store and no one knew what tortitas were. Is that an Oregon thing?
Greg, You are too funny. You don’t understand the Oregonian accent

Try http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tortilla

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Old 06-27-2007, 03:22 PM   #11
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Byron- looked all over the grocery store and no one knew what tortitas were. Is that an Oregon thing?
Some of us aint quite got this Spanish thing down yet.
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Old 06-27-2007, 07:55 PM   #12
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Here's my list for a long camp out:

Cooler 1: Freezer packs on the bottom, then One "Big Meat" per day: to BBQ for supper. Steak, Chicken kabobs, Salmon, Pork tenderloin, Bratwurst, etc. "Small Meats" like weiners, bacon, ham for breakfast/brunch/lunch. "Sandwich Meats" like salami. If in butcher paper, first put in big freezer bag so don't get damp. Bag of ice cubes on top.

Cooler 2: Freezer packs on bottom, then cukes, red pepper, cottage cheese, sour cream, cheddar cheese, orange juice, eggs, tomatoes, nectarines: things that are "nice to be cold" but can be simply cool. Bag of cubed ice on top.

Food Box: Potatoes, carrots, onions, apples. Tins of soup, beans, corn, diced tomatoes, devilled ham, tuna, jars of salsa, mustard, peanut butter, jam. Boxes of crackers, KD, fettucini, etc. On top: bread, hot dog buns, hamburger buns, nacho chips. Note: when making up the bed, DO NOT crush the buns (It does NOT "taste the same" no matter what my hubby sez.)

Fridge: Milk to go (can reseal top and store sideways if needed) cans or plastic bottles of pop, and ketchup, relish packs from fast-food places, butter (in fridge door), white wine in box or bag, maple syrup. In freezer: small box of pre-made burgers (fits perfectly!) and a small freezer pack.

Overhead Cupboard: Coffee, tea, sugar, powdered milk, salt and pepper and to make home made biscuits or pancakes: flour, baking powder. Under sink/stove, more beverages in plastic or cardboard containers.

Now, as the ice melts, one must Manage the Coolers. Move ice bag from "nice to be cold" to "must be cold" as needed. If you want ice in your drink, tear open "nice to be cold" ice cube bag to use.

As you go, save fridge space to store left-overs from meals. (Yesterdays's sad small bacon leftovers are great crumbled on tonight's baked potatoe!) Exchange small freezer pack from cooler to freezer as needed. Bring freezer bags to wrap/contain leftovers in the event of crazy bumpy roads with lots of jostling and sloshing. (reference: The Revenge of the Chowder: lost in the hacking.)

If you do travel to Civilization and think you only need gas and milk, you are wrong: Given the chance, ALWAYS BUY ICE.
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Old 06-27-2007, 08:18 PM   #13
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One of the really nice parts of having a larger 3-way fridge, is the freezer expanse. I can get 5-6 ice cube trays in there with space leftover. Which, to me, is a better use of space than putting food in there. Because that way, I can constantly create ice for a food cooler or two...as necessary. (which I've done...when friends without the ability to create ice come along) Besides it's pretty special having ice cream when camping
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Old 06-28-2007, 05:56 AM   #14
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One of the really nice parts of having a larger 3-way fridge, is the freezer expanse. I can get 5-6 ice cube trays in there with space leftover.
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Donna: I to have a 3 way fridge but not as big as yours but I have a 24 ice cube tray but the cubes are about the size of a pea and do not last long in a glass of liquid .
CharlynnT: Thanks for a ready made menu I will print this out and adapt to our taste but the key to whole thing is a good cooler I guess and will pick one up regardless of what the wife says about its bulkyness.
Tell me do you all store these coolers outside when you get to your destination?
.
The small floor space in the Lady-Bug doesn't allow room down there but on the bunks, I set up just to have more shelf space for things also fills up fast with boxes and my guitar.
Got to start to get everything ready as we are off Saturday and it just seems that the "TO-DO before we leave" list just gets longer and longer as the time of departure gets closer.
Gerry the canoebuilder
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