Campfires--yes or no? - Page 5 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-23-2015, 08:54 PM   #57
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Originally Posted by Bob Miller View Post
We are long removed from our Neanderthal relatives that sat outside the RV/cave eating a triceratops rib bone and (apparently) trying to woe the opposite sex with the size of their flame (?)

Won't get into a discussion of flame size (does it matter?) but we aren't all that long removed from our Neanderthal relatives. If you care to research it on the web, you will find that 3%-5% of the DNA of anyone of European descent is Neanderthal DNA. And you can get a kit allowing you to send in a cheek cell swab that will tell you exactly what percentage of your genes were inherited from the Neanderthals before they died out and we're still interbreeding. But I don't know if that has any effect on the desire to sit around a campfire.




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Old 07-23-2015, 09:05 PM   #58
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That might explain my problem when I was but a child. My knuckles were always bruised from dragging on the ground. Docs fixed it by taking out 3 inches from my arms and adding it to my legs. Worked out just about right.


BTW: Contrary to a certain theme park in TN (?), Triceratops were gone for a million years when cousins Mr. and Mrs. Neadner were enjoying a animal style double double from In and Out.....LOL
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Old 07-23-2015, 10:53 PM   #59
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I have always thought there was a connection between a camp fire and the early history of humans on our planet. I am guessing that early men attracted their females with the help of a dancing fire...
You may be right about the dancing fire. It had to be better than dancing men, which probably just made the females laugh.
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Old 07-24-2015, 12:46 AM   #60
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I recently stayed at Marble Quarry RVPark in Columbia Ca. You could use their fire pit and buy wood from them...the fire 'pit' was the inner liner of washing machines! So the fire was contained, the light came through the the holes..pretty!
I don't generally make a fire...asthma!
So maybe the propane fire would work for me..cleaner burning...no smoke!
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Old 07-24-2015, 06:35 AM   #61
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The washing machine drum fire pit is exceptionally popular in the more crowded RV parks and beach campgrounds on the west coast. Seems like it's standard equipment with larger class "A's" where storage is not a problem. The most sought after ones are the stainless steel tubs That puts the owner two steps up on the coolness ladder among their peeps.


Combine having a stainless steel fire tub with an outside 50" flat screen, a sat dish, recliner chairs, and beer on tap and a guy could become King of the Park...LOL now that's real camping!!!!! (Don't laugh, I have seen this!!!)
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Old 07-24-2015, 10:21 AM   #62
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There was a proto human species call Homo Habilis, (handy man). They were among the first makers of tools. They made almost the same kind of hand axe across the species. Some have hypothesized that the design of this axe was hard wired into their comparatively small brain.

I believe the same can be said of humans, and fire. It gave our species a HUGE advantage over our competitors.

Our house has a wood burning stove with a big window in the door. A few month after we moved into our house, when fall came, we had our first fire. My, then 6 year old son, sat transfixed, for a long time. Then he slowly turned to me and said, "Dad, it's better then TV".
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Old 07-24-2015, 10:50 AM   #63
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It's funny reading all this. I love a good fire, burning hot with no smoke on a cool night. But I love the outdoors so much that a fire is secondary. I've had fire, no fire, used a candlelight as a fake fire to have ambiance when there were rules, and it's all fun. But I watched the Dutch Elm disease bring down all the Elms years ago and see all the Emerald Ash borers destroying large swaths of forest and as I get older I realize my "rights" aren't that important. If I could never have another fire I'd be fine.

If we were all the same the world would be boring.

Take Care,
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Old 07-24-2015, 10:50 AM   #64
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The thing about that hand axe of homo habilis was they never figured out in million years to put a handle on it! No evidence of that simple addition of a handle to increase power.

I do consider "how to build a fire" a life skill I'm glad the kids and grand kids learned. How to start the propane one eh? Not so much. Using an axe safely and effectively? Also a life skill, hooking up propane bottle well yeah sort of important but I'm not thinking it is a skill exactly. Maybe something of a low level Darwinian test.

Are the gas burners a viable alternative? I'm sure. Would I refuse to sit around yours? Nope, be glad to pull up a chair. Am I going to buy one? Ha! Your kidding right? But then I do not live in California or an arid region so my motivation for having one is slim to none.

I'm a small fire type person as a rule, so I don't even need much firewood. But I have wondered how they expect a fire in a vertical tube of a fire pit to draw air. But not having small kids fall in is probably the motivation around here.
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Old 07-24-2015, 11:30 AM   #65
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(Quote) "But I have wondered how they expect a fire in a vertical tube of a fire pit to draw air."


If you are referring to the 24" high rings in the CA State Parts, the ones I have seen are about 42" across and have holes punched around the base to draw in combustion air, as well as to let extinguishing water run out.
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Old 07-24-2015, 12:02 PM   #66
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Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post
Our house has a wood burning stove with a big window in the door. A few month after we moved into our house, when fall came, we had our first fire. My, then 6 year old son, sat transfixed, for a long time. Then he slowly turned to me and said, "Dad, it's better then TV".
As a kid, I went to a few wilderness training type camps, one thing that the always said, that in the event you become lost was to first make a fire before just about anything else, as not only did it provide warmth, but also it had personality and character, helping psychologically.

I can't count the nights that I have stayed up after everyone else hit the sack, and just stared into the fire while contemplating life. Pretty sure this is what your son too found in the fire.
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I do consider "how to build a fire" a life skill I'm glad the kids and grand kids learned. How to start the propane one eh? Not so much. Using an axe safely and effectively? Also a life skill, hooking up propane bottle well yeah sort of important but I'm not thinking it is a skill exactly. Maybe something of a low level Darwinian test.
One of my favourite work chores is splitting wood. There is something therapeutic about it. Plus, it is good physical work too.

I was taught as a kid how to properly split wood, and have taught many others now too. One proud moment of my life was when at 16, a scrawny 110 lb whelp, I took my girlfriend to the midway, and successfully rang the bell using the techniques I was taught. These burly biker types hanging around, doing their big roundhouse swings, yet hitting the target on a big angle, could not make it ring, and claimed it rigged.
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(Quote) "But I have wondered how they expect a fire in a vertical tube of a fire pit to draw air."


If you are referring to the 24" high rings in the CA State Parts, the ones I have seen are about 42" across and have holes punched around the base to draw in combustion air, as well as to let extinguishing water run out.
One of the biggest problems I have seen with these rings, even the ones with good draw holes, is that they have dug a pit inside, and the air does not draw across the bottom of the pit. With the ground inside and out level, they do a much better job.

The issue with the tall sides for me, is more that they block most of the radiant heat, and that heat coming from the coals is more warming than the flames ever are. If they are short, it is much better.
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Old 07-24-2015, 12:33 PM   #67
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Thumbs up Campfires

In my 32 year career as a public parks administrator I purchased hundreds of park grills, and fire rings and over a thousand picnic tables from the Iowa based R. J. Thomas company. They have great products, very heavy duty and many many designs. These people know camping. Pilot Rock: Park, Camp, Street Site Equipment, Grills, Fire Pits, Picnic Tables, Benches. They were primarily purchased on a competitive bidding process using heavy duty specifications designed for the abuse the public tends to inflict on facilities designed for the enjoyment by all citizens. Pilot Rock equipment is used worldwide and they specialize in handicap designs too.
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Old 07-24-2015, 12:34 PM   #68
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The ones I have seen in California State Parks are setting on a concrete or firebrick base so that it's easier to clean out the coals and ashes., hence no pit...


And, when the alternative is "No Campfires", I'll bet that they are pretty good.


But, to paraphrase a former governor of California, "If you have seen one campfire, you have seen them all".


(BTW: If that wasn't funny, you don't know the joke.... LOLOLOL)
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Old 07-24-2015, 12:37 PM   #69
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In my 32 year career as a public parks administrator I purchased hundreds of park grills, and fire rings and over a thousand picnic tables from the Iowa based R. J. Thomas company. They have great products, very heavy duty and many many designs. These people know camping. Pilot Rock: Park, Camp, Street Site Equipment, Grills, Fire Pits, Picnic Tables, Benches. They were primarily purchased on a competitive bidding process using heavy duty specifications designed for the abuse the public tends to inflict on facilities designed for the enjoyment by all citizens. Pilot Rock equipment is used worldwide and they specialize in handicap designs too.
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They do make a good looking product, Dave. I was just looking at them yesterday. I have used that design for a grate in a campground before, where the grate is adjustable, and will fold right out of the way when not needed. The one I saw was dug into the ground, whereas these appear to sit on the ground, anchored in.
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Old 07-24-2015, 12:48 PM   #70
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Campfires

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I have the 30 inch diameter, fold back, infinitely adjustable grate, 18 inches deep. I have it filled with about 16 inches of pea gravel so my fire draws nicely and warms the body from the knees up as we sit around it. I've had this ring for 12 years, still very solid. Keep it covered with a piece of T-1 11 when not in use. Keeps ash acid action to a minimum with the fire ring sides. Sets on bricks, very slightly tipped so the grate is dead level when in use. Don't want my weenie rolling off the grate.
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