Camping and Bears - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-26-2007, 08:16 AM   #15
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After tent camping in Arkansas with bear for many years, and have seen first hand what they can do to a pop-up camper made a FG trailer my camper of choice. Keeping a clean camp is the number one deterant to make the bears seek food someplace else. Since I was upgrading from a tent I wanted something hard sided for my food stuffs. (was tired of having to lock up everything in your trunk or pickup cap)
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Old 02-26-2007, 08:34 AM   #16
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Fatal Black Bear Attacks Are Rare


Black bears rarely attack humans unprovoked, that is, unless we give them a reason to turn on us, they will usually go on their way and not bother with us - as happens with most wild animals. Humans are not the focus of a bear's day. The temperament of a black bear is such that they are very tolerant of humans. We have witnessed humans harassing a wild black bear by yelling, throwing rocks at it, and even walking up to a tree with a bear in it, and shaking the tree trying to get the bear to react. The most we have seen a black bear do with impolite people is to swat a branch in the direction of the person, huff or pop their jaws, or bluff charge. They can take a lot of abuse from people and do nothing. [b]Frankly, from what we have seen of wild bears, they have better manners than people. Under typical circumstances, black bears will be content to eat wild foods such as berries, fruits, nuts, grasses, and honey, as well as little animals.

Normally, black bears do not just randomly and casually attack people for no reason. Now and then, like with other wild animals, something goes wrong, and a black bear attacks a person. What makes a black bear want to attack a person?

Why black bears attack people:

> Person attempts to pet or feed or otherwise gets too close to a wild bear
> Person attempts to chase off or scare a wild bear
> Person startles a wild bear or walks too close to babies or den or food source
> Wild bear is hungry
According to the article, 3 of the four reasons a bear might attack (And in this case, I would say *Defend* over *Attack*) are people and the goofy things they do.

My closest encounter, other than the dumpster divers, was in a very remote spot, in borad daylight, when a bear sauntered within 15 feet of my campsite, on it's way to somehwere. It paused for a second, looked at me, I looked at him, and he countinued on his way.

Eric, your egg is no challenge for a bear. They could easily roll it over. I had one run by mine and bump it while it was headed for the giant snack bar with a folding lid in a campground at nite once. I thought it was an earthquake. As I looked out my window, all I could see was the bears backend headed towwards the dumpster. I think he had a fork and was wearing a napkin.

The next day, the whole side of my trailer was slimed and smelly, something like if your wet dog would have rubbed on your couch. But, it stunk more.
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Old 02-26-2007, 08:51 AM   #17
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Gina,

I understand that an egg is no match for a bear. (could probably grab the door and peel it right off) But after seeing a bear very effortlessly have his way with a pop-up I would like to feel a little bit more secure.

Eric
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Old 02-26-2007, 09:29 AM   #18
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I havent seen a bear in the state parks here thank goodnes.. I think the rangers make sure they dont roam in.. even tho we have black bears. I am up pretty early with the dogs and when its barely light out and foggie I always have that erie feeling 'eyes' are watching me... LOL so i dont wander to far...
Just glad i have my egg and not a tent trailer.... As someone said not usuing common since and putting food away and keeping campsites clean... also never know what idiots are out there too in campgrounds.... lots of homeless are allowed in a 20 day stay..... not that they are bad people but i am always aware of my surroundings.....
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Old 02-26-2007, 01:35 PM   #19
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Just as a typical residential door can be kicked in, but you lock it anyway, I think the egg shell is valuable protection. Never be the easiest meal in sight... that's my motto for this situation.
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Old 02-26-2007, 04:02 PM   #20
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Chigger's, Black Fly's and Skeeter's have drawn more blood on me than any bear has. Skunks are what I fear.
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Old 02-26-2007, 04:20 PM   #21
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Just as a typical residential door can be kicked in, but you lock it anyway, I think the egg shell is valuable protection. Never be the easiest meal in sight... that's my motto for this situation.
Which reminds me that if you and your buddy are being chased by a bear (cougar, vicious dog, etc.), you don't have to outrun the bear. Just outrun your buddy!
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Old 02-26-2007, 09:15 PM   #22
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Well...I`ve done a lot of dumb and dumber things in my life time, but one of the stupidest was getting between a black bear and our supper in a Jasper campgroud... ....he came around the back of our bus camper and stared to walk towards my wife and kids.....I yelled for them to get into the camper and I got to a wood splitting axe by the fire pit and got between the bear and our picnic table.....we were about 8 ft. apart.....as I lifted up the axe, the bear would back up a step...when I lowered the axe it would step ahead...this went on a few times as I was yelling to my wife to get a pot and lid and to make some noise, which she did ......at this point the bear snorted, turned, and walked away....while all this was going on, most campers were outside and were enjoying our encounter......their laughing was short lived when the bear started to make the rounds and everyone locked themselves in their trailers....we continued with our meal,(perogies and garlic sausage), we continued with our meal at the picnic table and the bear didn`t come back.....possibly good thing that it was a park bear and fairly docile......a relative in Canmore told me that if the bear wanted to attack, I would have never made it to the door of the camper, with it`s acceleration speed......Benny
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Old 02-26-2007, 11:01 PM   #23
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Skunks are what I fear


I have had a few bad encounters with them. They are merciless! Just ask any of my dogs!
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Old 03-01-2007, 08:25 AM   #24
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A man that I work with was telling me about an encounter he had with a black bear. In his words:

<blockquote>While working at Douglas Aircraft Company in Southern California, a group of us employees went camping at Yosemite. There were 4 sets of us (4 different tents). My friend Bill kept his food in the trunk of his car (as did everyone else). On our last night, I awoke to what sounded like someone chopping wood. I remember thinking, "What idiot is chopping wood this early in the morning?" Then, I hear someone honking a car horn. At this point, I'm guessing someone is trying to scare off a bear. The next thing I know my friend Bill is yelling, "Hay, it's a bear!". Bill kept yelling at the bear until it ran off. I got out of my tent just in time to see the black bear climbing out the driver side window of Bill's car. It ran off a ways and stopped to watch us. It eventually walked off. The bear was quite small, I'd say about the height of a big dog (German Shepherd/Golden Retriever sort of size, although more stout).

Apparently, the bear hooked his claws on the door frame of the drivers side door and bent the window down. The bear climbed in the car, reached into the back and was clawing the back seat out trying to get into the trunk. To brace itself, the bear was putting its back claws on the steering wheel thus honking the horn (it gave itself away). The damage, the driver side door completely destroyed, the back seat completely torn up, the front seat and dash board covered in foam & fabric pieces (from the back seat), mud, bear hair and blood (the bear cut itself breaking the glass).

We later found out that we weren't the only car to be victimized. This bear hit several cars that night, all white cars (including Bill's car)! Its MO was to break open the doors since it couldn't open the trunks (it can claw down but not up). The park ranger told us the bear probably got food out of a white car and now associates them with food. It might not have made a difference if food was in the trunk or not. Ironically, judging from the last car the bear hit (where it didn't get in, it only bent the door frame of ALL four car doors before giving up), the bear had to walk past my tent, past my car (which was black), to get to Bill's car. Bill said he heard the bear brush up against his tent (right next to mine) just before the car attack.

Note, we were about 8 hours from home and Bill had to stop by a car shop, get the window bent up, and duct tape plastic over the window for that long, long drive home. (The car shop did the patch-up for free since the story was so go.)

Moral, use the bear boxes provided by the park! (We didn't use them, but they were there.) Steve</blockquote>

A molded fiberglass trailer is probably much better protection than a tent, pop-up or stick built. Smooth surface and few gaps make it more difficult to get claw in to do the ripping and prying. Ultimately though, if the bear wants in, it gets in. Fortunately they don't want in very often.

I do not store food in my trailer and never cook in the trailer. I once forgot to put the food in the van and the racoons made quite a mess but thats another story. I would rather, if it comes to that, have the van ripped open than my trailer with the family in it. The statistics are against it, but a few precautions lower the odds even more.

Craig T.
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Old 03-01-2007, 11:23 AM   #25
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This looks like the same thread that was here pre-hack. Same arguments. Can't change the minds of those in favour or those against.
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Old 03-01-2007, 12:02 PM   #26
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In favour or against what? Not following you here.

Craig T.
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Old 03-01-2007, 12:36 PM   #27
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Black Bears are not always black. They can be black, brown, cinnamon and occasionally blonde or even white. Some black bears have a white chest patch.
Bears in moister, more densely forested regions tend to be black, while bears in the West, where conditions are drier and vegetation is sparser, tend to be brown or cinnamon. A black coat allows the bear to blend into the shadows created by dense trees and brush, and a brown coat blends better with the sandier, browner landscape. In addition, black retains heat far more than does a lighter color, so brown phase bears are less susceptible to heat stress in more open terrain.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The brown bear (Ursus arctos) is a species of bear distributed throughout the Northern hemisphere. Weighing up to 130700 kg (290-1,500 pounds), the larger races of brown bear tie with the Polar bear as the largest extant land carnivores. The grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis), the Kodiak Bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi), and the Mexican brown bear are North American subspecies of the brown bear. However, DNA analysis has recently revealed that the identified subspecies of brown bears, both Eurasian and North American, are genetically quite homogeneous, and that their genetic phylogeography does not correspond to their traditional taxonomy.[2] It is sometimes referred to poetically as the bruin.
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Old 03-01-2007, 01:48 PM   #28
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I have been backpacking Yosemite since 1970 either sleeping out in the open or in a tent. I have probably taken 30 or more trips. The furthur away from civilization I get, the safer I feel. Bears are the least of your worries. The two legged critters running around are much more of a concern than bears. Interestingly enough, most of my bear sitings have been in the valley near the trash cans. They come to where the food is. Follow the guidelines and keep your food in the bear containers and you will be fine.
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