Casita vs Scamp - Page 4 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-14-2014, 09:50 AM   #43
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I'd like to add a counterpoint in defense of Scamp and Casita…

In one sense, there are two categories of FGRVs: those with molded fiberglass interiors and those with conventional stick-built interiors. To my knowledge Scamp is the only manufacturer to offer both.

It shouldn't be surprising that stick-built interiors offer more choices, greater customization, and faster design change cycles. Fiberglass molds are expensive and time-consuming to manufacture, while stick designs can be altered with a click of a mouse. All of these are small companies running flat-out on production to keep pace with demand. There aren't resources left for extensive product development.

I myself prefer the aesthetic purity of an all-molded design, interior and exterior. I like being reminded that I am inside a fiberglass trailer, and I appreciate the historical connection to the earliest designs. The price I pay is fewer choices.

Despite the inherent limitations of molded fiberglass construction and small operations, the range of choices offered by Scamp and Casita is actually pretty impressive.

As Donna says, YMMV!
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Old 08-14-2014, 10:02 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by Frederick L. Simson View Post
Casita Deluxe models (Bathroom in front) do not have a front window, but Casita Standard models (front bunks, no bathroom) do have a front window.
Same is true of most of the scamp floor plans, in 13 ft. only the front bunk models will have front window. 16 ft. there is possible exception in standard layout 5 but if it does have a front window it's open to the storage/bath room not the trailer itself.

And deluxe layout A which has a front dinette rather than bunks with a side bath.
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Old 08-14-2014, 10:23 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by tractors1 View Post
I definitely 2nd this response from Casita. NONE of the US-based FG makers were cooperative for some of the changes I wanted. The good news is at least Escape sources many of their components in the USA to assemble in Canada.

Charlie Y
I know of no company which offers more customization or cooperation than Scamp. I got everything I asked for within reason, and in a towable size and shape.
Escape's smallest trailer, (15'8") is larger and less aerodynamic than a 16 Casita or Scamp, and can be optioned out well north of $30,000. (available only two days next year... first come first served).

Even this smallest version is too big and too expensive for my taste,
but then the thread is "Casita vs Scamp" not "Oliver vs Escape".
The latter being a viable comparison and valid fodder for another thread,
each a very nice trailer in it's targeted market.
Theoretically, the lines do blur, but in reality....not so much.
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Old 08-14-2014, 10:40 AM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
I'd like to add a counterpoint in defense of Scamp and Casita…

In one sense, there are two categories of FGRVs: those with molded fiberglass interiors and those with conventional stick-built interiors. To my knowledge Scamp is the only manufacturer to offer both.

It shouldn't be surprising that stick-built interiors offer more choices, greater customization, and faster design change cycles. Fiberglass molds are expensive and time-consuming to manufacture, while stick designs can be altered with a click of a mouse. All of these are small companies running flat-out on production to keep pace with demand. There aren't resources left for extensive product development.

I myself prefer the aesthetic purity of an all-molded design, interior and exterior. I like being reminded that I am inside a fiberglass trailer, and I appreciate the historical connection to the earliest designs. The price I pay is fewer choices.

Despite the inherent limitations of molded fiberglass construction and small operations, the range of choices offered by Scamp and Casita is actually pretty impressive.

As Donna says, YMMV!
The build method is the same in both the Deluxe and Scamp interior, only the material and fasteners are different.
There is no stickbuilt Scamp.
To define the term please read the thread entitled..." Ok, I have to ask..."
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Old 08-14-2014, 11:09 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by floyd View Post
The build method is the same in both the Deluxe and Scamp interior, only the material and fasteners are different.
There is no stickbuilt Scamp.
To define the term please read the thread entitled..." Ok, I have to ask..."
Floyd, I think you may have misunderstood my point. I was referring to the methods of construction of the interior components of different FGRVs. Escape, Bigfoot, L'il Snoozy, and deluxe Scamps build cabinets, seats, and beds with a wood frame and veneered panels, just like conventional RVs. The quality, of course, varies according to the types of wood-based materials used and joinery techniques. But it is accurate to call the interiors stick-built because they are made of pieces of wood.

My point was that it is much easier to change the dimensions and layout of a wood-framed interior because it only requires altering the CAD blueprint and cutting the pieces to different sizes. Changing a molded interior - like Casita, Parkliner, Oliver, Eggcamper, and standard Scamps requires the production of a new mold for each interior component being altered, or in the case of double-hull designs, a new mold for one whole side of the interior. This is expensive and time-consuming.

It was not my intention to disparage wood interiors in FGRVs. By most accounts the deluxe Scamps are beautiful and demonstrate high-quality craftsmanship. My intention was to point out why a company like Escape (being exhibited in a series of earlier posts as a paradigm of flexibility) is able to accommodate a greater degree of customization in interior design.
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Old 08-14-2014, 02:06 PM   #48
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Luke,

I readily respond with my references to other trailers outside of Scamp and Casita because I see your description as "Future Owner". My suggestion would be to at LEAST consider the other competitive brands- especially Escape because it's more in line with pricing. I'm not unhappy with my Scamp but would like to see some improvements- elimination of the infamous snap caps comes to mind!! That could be done by adding strips into the fiberglass and bolt the cabinets etc to it instead of drilling through the outside. More money? Sure, but I'd gladly pay it.

Just as a side note, here are some things I had to do to my Scamp to bring it up to par with what I feel should be "standard" equipment or at LEAST be offered and some things just should NOT be done this way: (I purchased a 13' Standard with bath in 2010 new)

The curtains! Very simple...but they're "see-through" and we were advised by friends to add some material to them immediately or get new curtains. I sewed in Roc-lun...what a job. I had to fabricate me a support for the rear window curtain rod because they were sagging so bad! Couldnt "Blinds" be offered as an option??

Underneath, where the drain pipes protrude through, Scamp left raw wood under there and a huge opening for mice and other little animals to make a wonderful home. I had to coat those openings with fiberglass resin then stuff brass "Brillo" up in there to "block" the openings.

I had to purchase my own fire/CO alarms...none came with it.

I just recently changed out the door handle to the FIC because every Scamp key will fit another Scamp! Some may be ok with them, but I feel Scamp should at least offer a nicer lock as an option.

Door seal! That's major. My door was soaked with water from rain while on the road the SECOND day of ownership because SCamp uses an open-cell sponge to seal their doors! I had Kent Eveland send me a "D" seal but was asked to way 60 days to put it on. I waited 6 months.

Door interior exposure. I had to add a "Kick Plate" to my Scamp door to prevent the bottom of it becoming FILTHY with road grime because it basically extends underneath the Scamp!!

Finally, I added the wonderful digital thermostat mod (found on the Casita forum) to my A/C. While hooking it up, I found Scamp used 15 amp wire (and I have a heat strip) when Coleman CLEARLY states to use 20 amp minimum! I cant figure out til today why they did and do that. I brought it to Scamp's attention and dunno if they will or have changed it or not.

The awning body mounts they wouldnt ship with my Scamp- even though they came with my Dometic awning! I called told them I wanted my mounts. I hate trying to stake the legs to the ground. Kent was afraid somebody would let the door swing open and bend the legs with them snapped to the side of the Scamp. Geeee...not NEAR as dangerous as I've had my stakes come out in loose ground and nearly flip the awning!

Check out this link to my Flickr site where I have alot of my mods with pics posted. There's other things I've posted as well but this link is to the "albums" and you can pick n choose.

We love the Scamp now after 4 yrs of mods to make it more user-friendly and what I feel- up to date. I just wish they would change some things. But as we've discussed in the SCamper group...they probably wont because they sell too good as they are. AND, you may be perfectly happy with a stock Scamp. This was just my experience with them.

I will say that their build and finish on mine was near perfect! But I do not want to do all this work that makes me happy on my next new camper purchase. And I hope you dont find this post "offensive" but this is real-life I've stated in the FG world. Unfortunately, I cant compare it honestly with Casita other than what I mentioned earlier as I've never owned one. The towing with these style/shaped campers is WONDERFUL. I get 20mpg avg towing with a 4cyl Nissan Frontier.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/50351683@N08/sets/

Darral

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Who's wins? Discuss.
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Old 08-14-2014, 02:29 PM   #49
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Darral, I don't think I have read any experiences similar to yours from Casita owners. Maybe that does say something about Scamp vs Casita.
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Old 08-14-2014, 02:34 PM   #50
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One way my way

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
I'd like to add a counterpoint in defense of Scamp and Casita…

In one sense, there are two categories of FGRVs: those with molded fiberglass interiors and those with conventional stick-built interiors. To my knowledge Scamp is the only manufacturer to offer both.

It shouldn't be surprising that stick-built interiors offer more choices, greater customization, and faster design change cycles. Fiberglass molds are expensive and time-consuming to manufacture, while stick designs can be altered with a click of a mouse. All of these are small companies running flat-out on production to keep pace with demand. There aren't resources left for extensive product development.

I myself prefer the aesthetic purity of an all-molded design, interior and exterior. I like being reminded that I am inside a fiberglass trailer, and I appreciate the historical connection to the earliest designs. The price I pay is fewer choices.

Despite the inherent limitations of molded fiberglass construction and small operations, the range of choices offered by Scamp and Casita is actually pretty impressive.



As Donna says, YMMV!
As an example ; I wanted some additional 120 VAC outlets, 12VDC outlets and speaker cables roughed in . Casita agreed to install what I wanted at the listed option price . The problem was that they would only install them in a location of their choosing. I ended up instaling the additional outlets and cables myself in order to get the locations I desired. They would not budge leading to the remark " "BUY AN ESCAPE" I understand that the molds are fixed and structural changes are difficult but that's not what I was asking for
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Old 08-14-2014, 03:16 PM   #51
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There's a production mgr at Scamp that is SUPER to deal with in these types of additions. His name is "Dave". I requested a dome light and 12v outlet at the front near the door. He personally walked out to a 13' while on the phone and told me "Yeah, there's a perfect place on the front bulk head for both." ( I have the bathroom) I was impressed; and they did it exactly as requested. So Scamp will work with you on locating what you want if at all possible. And no, no mods I wanted included "changing the mold". I do think they've changed it to make the bed wider in the "Standard" now....HOW I wish they'd had that when I ordered mine! (Something else to think about Luke!)

I didnt get it when I ordered my Scamp, but I would HIGHLY recommend an outside 120v outlet. I installed one myself but would have paid to have that done...and they WILL do this. What I did was, change out the 120v at the closet to GFI and ran my outside plug from it so it is GFI as well but not exposed to the weather (cheaper replacement). That's on my Flickr link.

Quote:
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As an example ; I wanted some additional 120 VAC outlets, 12VDC outlets and speaker cables roughed in ......The problem was that they would only install them in a location of their choosing.
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Old 08-14-2014, 03:16 PM   #52
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Darrl,

I own a used 2012 scamp 13, and have owned less than one year. Same issues with open cellars foam seal on door... Rain comes in at bottom, so I too, just ordered the D shaped Epdm rubber stuff. Parts told me they really haven't found anything yet that works well with their doors - end quote.

Listen, I love my trailer and I didn't buy it new from them, so maybe I can't complain about production issues.

I am a kind person and very respectful and congenial. I just wish when I order parts or ask questions, wouldn't be spoken to so curtly or abruptly, or not have phone calls or emails unanswered. Makes me feel like I'm bothering them and I've always paid for my parts, big shipping charges and thanked them for their time.

Anywho, just my two cents and like you, I do not wish to offend. But if this is truly an open forum all opinions should be respected, even if not agreed with.

Wendy


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Old 08-14-2014, 03:18 PM   #53
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Sorry...open cell foam. My apologies.


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Old 08-14-2014, 05:56 PM   #54
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The door design on the Scamp is a challenge to seal due to the wrap around "airplane" style form fitted door. When opened or closed the weatherstrips sweep away from the body rather then pull straight away. This dislodges the strips from their adhesive. Also the hinges are close set to one another which allows the door to flex away from the body in stead of compressing the WS foam. Most D shaped molded rubber WS are too stiff to compress, and will hold the door out from the body. A really wimpy D type WS would be ideal.
The Casita 17 tackled the problem by molding a flat protrusion from the trailer side that would accommodate a flat door. No sealing problem.
The Casita wins that contest on functionality, but loses on aesthetics and aerodynamics big time. The Scamp airplane doors are funky and way cool looking. Since I live in a dry part of the world I have been tolerant with the Scamp door and Its shortcomings.
Russ
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Old 08-14-2014, 07:17 PM   #55
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Smile Trailer brands

I like our Trillium because of the fiberglass is all around and inside used to strengthen the structure. This makes for a light structure as well as weather proof.

I could never understand why fiberglass trailers are touted as being so leakproof in comparison to stickies and then the manufacturers proceed to drill all kinds of holes through the fiberglass!

I understand that Scamps have wooden floors exposed to the weather underneath. If I am incorrect in this, please correct me. Aline type trailers have exposed wooden floors and have a real problem with rot.

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Old 08-14-2014, 08:10 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by Roger C H View Post
I
I understand that Scamps have wooden floors exposed to the weather underneath. If I am incorrect in this, please correct me. Aline type trailers have exposed wooden floors and have a real problem with rot.

.
The floors on the Scamp are OSB, polyester resin coated underneath.
No fiberglass trailer has suffered floor rot due to exposure from below under anything close to normal use.
Window maintenance and vent leaks can be a problem in all campers, but fold ups and stickies leak a lot more from above the floor and thus have more floor rot.
A molded fiberglass bottom merely holds this water in and accelerates floor rot.
Still, good maintenance and dry storage will keep any molded fiberglass trailer usable for a lifetime.


As for "through the hull" fasteners...they are far superior to laminated board attachment to anyone who has been faced with repairs.
The 30year survival rate of pop-rivet fasteners in this application must be in the way high 95+ percentile.
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