Count the cost(and the intent) - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 12-19-2016, 06:38 PM   #29
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An example... Chicago SOLD (privatized) the rights to street parking in the city.The buyer then collected the money and kept it. They even used municipal enforcement to collect fines for themselves.
Meanwhile, the city squandered the purchase money and left the public at the mercy of pirates.

A coordinated contract would have left the ownership and management of parking in the hands of the city, the contract owner would simply provide the personnel and their direct supervision to maintain and collect parking fees for the city. The city(taxpayers) would still receive the funds and the city would collect the fines. This would reduce the number of direct government employees but it would also maintain the quality of service at a reduced cost to the taxpayer.

I do understand there are arguments against coordinated contracts and I am not here endorsing the practice. I am merely pointing out that there is a difference. I see no merit to the former, but the latter has some legitimate applications.
Some things need to be privatized, but not legitimate government functions. Remember ROBOCOP?!
AGREED, THERE IS NO GOOD ANSWER. BUT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN $80 AND $150 IS TYPICALLY NOT GOING TO MAKE OR BREAK AN OUTING. BUT I DO AGREE THE COST OF LIVING SURE IS GETTING STEEP. JUST PAID MY PRPERTY TAX OF $4,800 HERE AND $3,750 IN REEDSBURG, and $2.52 ON MY PROPERTY BY THE MISSISPPI.
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Old 12-19-2016, 07:00 PM   #30
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AGREED, THERE IS NO GOOD ANSWER. BUT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN $80 AND $150 IS TYPICALLY NOT GOING TO MAKE OR BREAK AN OUTING. BUT I DO AGREE THE COST OF LIVING SURE IS GETTING STEEP. JUST PAID MY PRPERTY TAX OF $4,800 HERE AND $3,750 IN REEDSBURG, and $2.52 ON MY PROPERTY BY THE MISSISPPI.
The difference between $150 and $ 80 is $70 . Not much money to some and a lot of money to others . To pretend that everyone in a America is living the good life and has tons of disposable income is naive at best . I remember when we were first married , I went to work with no money in my pocket and with no lunch in order to make my house payments . On weekends I worked a second job so my children were fed . $50 a night camping fees often make it impossible for young families especially with children to camp in a local park in which they pay taxes to support. Why is it the ones who have money have so little regards for those who do not ?
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Old 12-19-2016, 07:10 PM   #31
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$50 a night camping fees often make it impossible for young families especially with children to camp in a local park in which they pay taxes to support.
I can afford $50/night camping, but I will never do it. And never did. I'd stay overnight on walmart parking lot while travelling, but I will not shell out $50 for an overnight stay.
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Old 12-19-2016, 07:14 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by steve dunham View Post
The difference between $150 and $ 80 is $70 . Not much money to some and a lot of money to others . To pretend that everyone in a America is living the good life and has tons of disposable income is naive at best . I remember when we were first married , I went to work with no money in my pocket and with no lunch in order to make my house payments . On weekends I worked a second job so my children were fed . $50 a night camping fees often make it impossible for young families especially with children to camp in a local park in which they pay taxes to support. Why is it the ones who have money have so little regards for those who do not ?
Steve, I was just merely trying to state that $70 for 4 nights ($17.50/night) typically can be saved up somehow. As Donna stated "you can't take it with you". Believe me, I know what pinching pennies are ..I am just trying to say..try and find some positives..enjoy the time we get rather than complaining about things we can not change.
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Old 12-19-2016, 09:00 PM   #33
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It helps to compare it to the alternatives. Motels are also getting more expensive. And for most of us, the campground is closer to the activities we travel to enjoy.
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Old 12-19-2016, 10:32 PM   #34
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State or Federal parks are places we have decided are worth protecting or saving for the future. Protecting these places, as in the case of Yosemite, for instance, meant protecting the place from loggers, minors or developers that would ruin the natural beauty and change the natural wonder of it. So, if a place has been determined to be worth saving, it should be saved for all by paying for it with public funds. We are not saving these places just for the folks that camp there, wer'e saving them for all of us, forever. If it's important enough to save, it's important enough to pay for. If it's public land, it should be available without hardship to the public always. I disagree with the notion that camping fees should support the parks. If the State turns control of these natural wonders over to private corporations to manage, how is it still public land owned by you and me?

Bodie State Park in CA is a perfect example of "managing", but not of a public system of "protecting it for all of us as public land". The rangers treat the place as though they own it and visitors are trespassing. They lock away the historical artifacts and declare them unsafe to look at. But if you join a special club and pay more fees, you can get access. The history is protected from the public, not for the public. And the public is who owns it.

We went camping in the Petrified Forest when I was a kid. As we left, a Ranger stuck his head inside the car and asked if we had taken any of their rocks. My father commented that out back there was a front end loader digging up tons of "their rocks" and loading them into trucks to be sold. Protecting our land for our use and our study? Hardly.

The Bristlecone Forest in eastern CA is the opposite. No entrance fee. An amazing place with fantastic historical and scientific significance. A large beautiful campground with a "suggested" donation of only $5. per night. A visitor's center and trails worth spending several days to fully comprehend. Ranger guided walks with explanations that reveal wonders I never would have seen on my own. It's a real gem.

Interesting too, that I finally was able to build my home on five acres that backs up to BLM land in rural Nevada and the Pine Nut mountains. Now I find I have much less desire to "get away". We're also getting very good at avoiding the modern hassles that seem to often accompany camping trips that should really be about peace and quiet, such as lots of fees and lots of traffic.
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Old 12-19-2016, 11:08 PM   #35
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Bodie State Park in CA is a perfect example of "managing", but not of a public system of "protecting it for all of us as public land". The rangers treat the place as though they own it and visitors are trespassing. They lock away the historical artifacts and declare them unsafe to look at. But if you join a special club and pay more fees, you can get access. The history is protected from the public, not for the public. And the public is who owns it.
Interesting, I've been there a few times and have never had any thing but good vibes and info from the rangers. Never heard of any special club, can you give any other info on that? Been all over Bodie, can't say where they may be hiding anything out of site unless it would be in one of the private residence houses.
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Old 12-19-2016, 11:31 PM   #36
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I didn't say they were "hiding" it. Just not allowing close study of the old equipment that is locked up in buildings. One excuse was it was too dangerous. Some of the old abandoned buildings with windows have early motors and other electrical and mechanical equipment that was unique to Bodie when it was a big and active town. Very early transmitted power came to Bodie and some of the equipment is still there. Very historic stuff and interesting especially to gear heads or mechanical historians.

I've personally been told by the rangers I could not go in and look closely at the stuff, and would have to look at it through the windows. It's as if they personally owned it. But the windows are too dirty to see much. I recently complained to my neighbors (we all live only about 1 1/2 hours from Bodie) because they were having horse events there and going occasionally. I was told that they are members of the historical society, not sure of the real title, and they can go into those buildings that the public cannot. I'm not willing to pay to become part of an elite group in order to qualify to study history on public land.

I've seen the attitude before and it always rubs me the wrong way. The rangers don't own the property, but they sometimes act as if they do and as if the public is just a nuisance that must be managed. It's not that way everywhere.
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Old 12-19-2016, 11:38 PM   #37
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Perhaps the rangers are protecting the artifacts from vandals and souvenir hunters?
Perhaps if you really cared, you would join these people who are helping to protect and restore?
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Old 12-20-2016, 01:34 AM   #38
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Perhaps the rangers are protecting the artifacts from vandals and souvenir hunters?
Perhaps if you really cared, you would join these people who are helping to protect and restore?
I care more about the history of the West than most. I'm sorry you missed the point, but perhaps you should learn more about the subject if you're going to give advice.

Meanwhile,

I know historical items have to be protected against vandals. I live and play in the old west and have for most of my life. I visit places and study them in depth. I watch their evolution.

I don't want to stray too far from the point of the discussion, but my point is and has been that if places are important enough to protect for all of us and our future, we should all pay to protect them and all have access to them without undue burden. Yosemite and Yellowstone are good examples of this.

Interpreting what protecting means is an interesting subject in itself. Death Valley is a very historic area. As it changed from open land to monument to national park, the interpretation of protect and preserve has evolved. Where does history begin and end? One interesting area that I used to visit was filled with old mining equipment, cars and all sorts of stuff. Then it all got bulldozed onto a pit and covered over to return the view to its natural state. Is that protecting history? Is it preserving the land? One of my friends joked "it's a place where it's illegal to drop a can and illegal to pick one up". It's one of the most desolate places on earth and you can be many miles from the next person or from any water, but if you let your dog out of the truck for a minute and he's not on a leash, and a ranger sees you, it's ticket time. There is currently a fight to decide on the future of a delightful hot springs in the area. It has been cared for and improved for many many years and is visited by people that cherish it. The park service wants to bulldoze the area and eliminate any evidence that people have ever been there. Funny thing is, it takes hours of travel on dirt roads to get there and only a few people know of it. It's an oasis where wildlife and the public meet. Once a month or so, uniformed officers arrive in Humvees and if anyone is there, they are likely to get their licenses and registrations checked. "Have a good day out here on our public land".

Then there's the mines near Randsburg. If ever there were places that should be closed or filled in, it was these. Deep holes in sandy soil dug hundreds of feet straight down with flimsy shoring. Just waiting to seal anyone's fate that was not paying attention as they walked. We would throw rocks in and wait and wait for their report. But not from too close or the funnel of sand would start you sliding towards doom.

Mind bending history and time warps are just around the corner in the desert. I once visited an old railroad station, sitting quietly in the empty area near Amboy Crater. Just a lot of white sand and some old railroad ties next to a frame of an old building that once was the station. I could sort of tell the shape of the platform. While wandering around enjoying the quiet, I spotted a corner of a piece of paper in the sand. I carefully pulled it out and began to read the barely legible writing. It was a letter from some official about the new station they were going to build there. The very station I was standing at that was now long abandoned. Yikes. It's the magic of the desert. Time stands still. The past handshakes with the present. A dry landscape shaped by violent flash floods. Endlessly fascinating.
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Old 12-20-2016, 03:22 AM   #39
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I didn't say they were "hiding" it. Just not allowing close study of the old equipment that is locked up in buildings. One excuse was it was too dangerous. Some of the old abandoned buildings with windows have early motors and other electrical and mechanical equipment that was unique to Bodie when it was a big and active town. Very early transmitted power came to Bodie and some of the equipment is still there. Very historic stuff and interesting especially to gear heads or mechanical historians.
I've personally been told by the rangers I could not go in and look closely at the stuff, and would have to look at it through the windows. It's as if they personally owned it. But the windows are too dirty to see much. I recently complained to my neighbors (we all live only about 1 1/2 hours from Bodie) because they were having horse events there and going occasionally. I was told that they are members of the historical society, not sure of the real title, and they can go into those buildings that the public cannot. I'm not willing to pay to become part of an elite group in order to qualify to study history on public land.
I've seen the attitude before and it always rubs me the wrong way. The rangers don't own the property, but they sometimes act as if they do and as if the public is just a nuisance that must be managed. It's not that way everywhere.
Guess I did kind of miss read your comments John. I know what you mean about the dirty glass as it does make it a bit hard to see. Fortunately most don't have glass but wire fencing to look through. I'm not a die hard gear head so seeing the equipment from a distance is fine with me but I can understand your point. I retired from a water district, we did have tours through our treatment plant but no one was allowed in certain areas for safety/security reasons. There were folks in the business from other districts that got to see many more areas. For the last 17 years I was in charge of repairing/replacing pretty much anything on our out buildings that vandals decided they wanted or liked. Can I say I hate graffiti artists? It's the 2% that the rangers are worried about, not someone like you. Wonder if getting to know one of the rangers would open some doors.
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Old 12-20-2016, 06:23 AM   #40
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"Protecting these places, as in the case of Yosemite, for instance, meant protecting the place from loggers, minors or developers that would ruin the natural beauty and change the natural wonder of it. "


I'm all for protecting "public" (ought to be public!) lands from loggers and developers. Generally, though, some minors are nice little tykes, and others are hellions. So I suppose we have to protect the lands from the little hellions, too. Darn those hellion minors!


I used to wonder why our local bar would serve anyone but minors. They have something against mining?


Just a lighter note. 8) BEST later December to you all, Happy Holidays and Merry Christmas or whatever holiday you celebrate.


Especially Festivus! Only 3 more complaining days until Festivus! Today, the next day, and the day after--then FESTIVUS! Yaaaay!


We're having the traditional meatloaf.


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Old 12-20-2016, 06:38 AM   #41
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I've personally been told by the rangers I could not go in and look closely at the stuff, and would have to look at it through the windows. It's as if they personally owned it. .....

I've seen the attitude before and it always rubs me the wrong way. The rangers don't own the property, but they sometimes act as if they do and as if the public is just a nuisance that must be managed. It's not that way everywhere.
The public servants at the "Ranger" level are at the bottom of the chain. You're complaining about the wrong people. They're doing the job they are paid to do. If you have issues, you need to take it up with those that make the rules. Remember, everyone has a boss. Talk to the boss.
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Old 12-20-2016, 06:50 AM   #42
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Park Rangers don't make /set park policy but simply follow it . Policy is often set by some politically appointed beurocrat who has no idea of what he / she is doing but wants to feel important.
It's like blaming the poor gas station attendant for the high price of gasoline .
As Donna said , if you don't like the rules then talk to the person who makes the rules but be aware you may just end up where your at right now mad and frustrated .
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