Emergency Preparedness - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-19-2012, 12:00 PM   #1
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Emergency Preparedness

There's been a lot said about being prepared for a disaster, such as earth quakes, wind storms, anything that will take out the infra structure. There was a simulated 9.x earth quake drill in my area this week. Which got me to wondering, do you consider your trailer an escape pod? Is it prepared to live in for 2 to 3 weeks without infra structure?

For me the answer is yes. When I purchased my trailer that was one of the thoughts. My trailer always has food in it, close to a full propane tank, and a full fresh water tank. There's warm clothing in the closet and everything I would need to live for a couple weeks.

Anybody else consider their trailer in this manner?
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Old 10-19-2012, 12:37 PM   #2
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Stuff I've had a thought to in "gaming" the old infrastructure breakdown: powdered sulfa, water purification tabs, axe, long sharp panga, block of magnesium, tinderbox, social shotgun, 72" rawhide boot laces, yes; trailer, no.

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Old 10-19-2012, 12:39 PM   #3
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Absolutely!
Mine is my biggest "Go Box" where other Go Boxes are stored.

I have used mine a few times to pick up with no notice and work in disaster areas and all I have to make sure of is that my supplies are topped up.

I seem to have it a lot better than many other responders who live a much more stark lifestyle while volunteering,I have even felt a little guilt over it.

But.... Better Prepared than not Prepared!
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Old 10-19-2012, 12:49 PM   #4
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Yes I have in fact just the other day during the annual earth quake drill we have. ;-)

Like you I make sure the propane tank is full and the battery is charged full & I leave first aid supplies and warm bedding stored in plastic containers in it all winter, along with some food staples and radio etc. Due to the cold cant leave water in it though so I keep extra water stored in easy to get at spots in the house just in case. Or at least I hope I can get to it in the event of an earth quake. The trailer is great to use for cooking and sleeping if we have a long spell of power outages due to winter wind storms but I dont hold much hope for it in the event of an earth quake so I have a couple of other portable emergency kits with tent etc on hand for that. The problem is my trailer is stored in a carport on the downside of a very steep property - if we get a really good rock and roll & the house was to go down it will go down on top of the trailer. Not an option to store it on the uphill side of the house :-(
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Old 10-19-2012, 02:07 PM   #5
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I also consider my Casita an escape pod. Between trips I still leave emergency clothing like clean underwear, socks, thermals, 3 way jackets, and a couple of pairs of shorts, jeans, and short and long sleeved shirts, etc. packed in it. Also I repack sheets, blankets, wash cloths and towels as soon as I get home and get them washed.

I also keep a small supply of canned meats, instant potatoes, rice, instant refried beans, gravy mixes, cooking oil and bouillon and spices, along with a few cans of vegetables so that if we had to leave on a moment's notice we would have the very essentials for several days. We also keep bottled water handy, ready to load on the truck.

And I keep the water tank 3/4 full, along with making sure I keep the propane tanks filled. We also try to not let our truck's gas tank get below half full.

We live in a rural area that periodically loses power during winter storms, occasionally for days. Knowing that we can stay clean and warm in the Casita if needed gives us a feeling of security.

When we travel, we pack the same whether we would be gone 6 days or 6 weeks so that we are free to change our plans if we want to. Clothing is multipurpose and always can be layered for changing weather conditions.

That's one of the reasons I named our Casita Egg Harbor.
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Old 10-19-2012, 02:29 PM   #6
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Last winter a number of motorhome and trailer owners in Pasadena, CA had to live n their RV's for up to a week when the power was out following windstorm damage.
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Old 10-19-2012, 06:52 PM   #7
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In the summer, I would say my Escape is fully loaded and ready to go. In the winter, though, I take out the food and drain the water - so then it's only mostly ready. Since it stays pretty dry, I leave the cushions, linen and clothes inside year round.
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Old 10-19-2012, 07:08 PM   #8
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It's interesting to me that you received replies from all over the country whether earthquake country or not. I'm a native San Franciscan and we are reminded regularly to prepare for an earthquake. Our schools conduct earthquake drills regularly. Even so, I believe many of us have not stocked the necessary supplies.

We have our food and camping supplies at home, outdoors (in case our house falls). In fact, we purchase our emergency food supplies with an eye toward disaster preparedness. We rotate our emergency food for use at home and for camping. Our trailer is parked 30 minutes away from our home because we do not have room here so it would not be our immediate "go to" shelter. We have a camping tent in our emergency supplies.

There have been two emergencies that I have lived through. When we lived in Boston there was a Nor-Easter that had wind so strong it knocked down many trees along our street as well as a large maple that fell on our house! Thank goodness no one was hurt and our house was intact. There was no electricity and we could not drive for a week.

The other "emergency" that you might not think of was a week-long grocery checkers strike! No checkers, no food. That one was a bit odd, but we survived!

The moral for all of us is the same as the Girl Scout motto "Be Prepared".
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Old 10-19-2012, 10:45 PM   #9
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Yes my trailer would be the first alternative in the event of an earthquake.
It is fully ready and the water tank is full.

Even though Carol and I don't live far from each other I'm on flat ground and keep a heater on in the trailer all winter.

I did read Cascadia's fault.
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Old 10-19-2012, 10:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilda View Post
It's interesting to me that you received replies from all over the country whether earthquake country or not. I'm a native San Franciscan and we are reminded regularly to prepare for an earthquake. Our schools conduct earthquake drills regularly. Even so, I believe many of us have not stocked the necessary supplies.

We have our food and camping supplies at home, outdoors (in case our house falls). In fact, we purchase our emergency food supplies with an eye toward disaster preparedness. We rotate our emergency food for use at home and for camping. Our trailer is parked 30 minutes away from our home because we do not have room here so it would not be our immediate "go to" shelter. We have a camping tent in our emergency supplies.

There have been two emergencies that I have lived through. When we lived in Boston there was a Nor-Easter that had wind so strong it knocked down many trees along our street as well as a large maple that fell on our house! Thank goodness no one was hurt and our house was intact. There was no electricity and we could not drive for a week.

The other "emergency" that you might not think of was a week-long grocery checkers strike! No checkers, no food. That one was a bit odd, but we survived!

The moral for all of us is the same as the Girl Scout motto "Be Prepared".
It's good to be prepared. Note: I said "such as earth quakes, wind storms, or anything else that will take out the infra structure".

There's no place that is not susceptible to infra structure failure.

Anne H. A small electric heater will prevent the water in you fresh water tank from freezing in most of the country. I've always kept mine full, and keep a heater running when there's freezing weather.
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Old 10-19-2012, 11:14 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel A. View Post
Even though Carol and I don't live far from each other I'm on flat ground and keep a heater on in the trailer all winter. [/I]
LOL Was actually thinking I might put some heat on in it this winter but as I indicated I don't hold out much hope that the trailer will survive a big one. Only have about 7 posts on the downhill side of the house holding it all about 30' up in the air above the trailer. House was built prior to the earth quake building codes so not so sure about how secure to the foundation it actually is either. During the couple of good shakes we have had since moving here, big enough to cause doors to start swinging on there own, I heading out the front door to the high side of the property rather than staying in the house. But you never know it would indeed be nice if the trailer did survive.
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Old 10-19-2012, 11:20 PM   #12
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In the winter here I have everything put away and trailer winterized. I have never kept water in the fresh water tank. After a week or so - yuk. I would not want to use it unless emergency. Canned food would freeze and dry food would draw critters.
Guess I had never thought I might need to use the camper like right away. It is parked almost an hour away in winter storage. Something to think about.
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Old 10-20-2012, 07:16 AM   #13
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A trailer winterized and parked an hour away is not precisely a bug-out bag with sodium iodide, fire starter, boots and wool socks. With that said, mine's in the driveway and I don't plan on "hardening" a trailer for survival as a retirement project. I also note that pulling onto the scene as a "responder" in a travel trailer requires a residuum of intact roadway negotiable by vehicles less capable than halftracks and arctic cats. Given the insurance companys' Big Three of fire, flood, wind, the expectation of using a travel trailer with huge windage, no tiedowns, and a minimally "fire-resistant" structure as refuge and supply storage is a pretty iffy proposition but I suppose it's like having a storm cellar or outbuilding that may or may not be usable when the main life-support structure is gone. What's the source of power for the water tank dipstick, Byron. House current? Genset?

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Old 10-20-2012, 07:41 AM   #14
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There's no doubt that a small trailer makes an excellent back up in an emergency. It's small size, water tightness make it very easy to heat, just turning on the stove for a minute or two can make a small trailer toasty warm.

As back up we have a small thousand watt generator, a $125 beauty that we've had for 5 years, used by a number of people during short term emergencies.

There are a lot of RV parts that can help in an emergency. We gave our son a small Inverter that he used to keep his pellet stove going during a few day power outage, connecting the inverter his car battery.

The bathroom, water tank, propane stove and fridge, solar panels, water tight space, small volume, inverters.... are all things that definitely in the short term provide a survival platform. Without a lot of effort an RV provides a useful backup to your home.

Most emergency situations are short in duration and your trailer can make a difference.
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