Equalizer Bars - Fiberglass RV


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Old 12-20-2018, 10:39 AM   #1
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Name: Russ
Trailer: Bigfoot
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Equalizer Bars

With a pending 3/4 or 1 ton tow vehicle, pulling a 25 ft Bigfoot, any need for equalizer and sway bar set up?

I have read everything from definitely YES to "couldn't wait to get rid of them."

I am leaning toward just equalizer bars to relieve some of the tongue weight and as I describe it "balance two vehicles as one."

Thoughts?

Thank you
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Old 12-20-2018, 10:59 AM   #2
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Name: Daniel A.
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I've always used equalizer bars to keep everything level, if you find things running level once connected you don't really need them. My unit would run at a bad angle without them. I've never found a need for a sway bar but I am careful about balancing the load.



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Old 12-20-2018, 11:36 AM   #3
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Weight Distribution hitches need only to be used if the tongue weight is great enough to cause the back of the tow vehicle to go too low.

Anti-sway bars only mask real problems. Sway occurs at some speed and the trick is to keep the trailer weight distribution such that the sway speed is way above driving speed. Many trailer towers tow at around 55 to 60 mph which is usually well below sway speed.

Understand that ball and socket hitch was designed for freedom of movement and WDHs and Anti-sway bars can only inhibit that movement.
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Old 12-20-2018, 12:00 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman View Post
Anti-sway bars only mask real problems.
Obviously this is opinion not fact, so read all you can and make your own decision.
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Old 12-20-2018, 12:01 PM   #5
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I don't drive at night, if I can help it, so my lights can point anywhere they like. I use a weight distribution hitch to distribute weight from the rear axle of the tow vehicle to the front axle of the tow vehicle and to the trailer axle.
My vehicle is four-wheel-drive, but predominately front wheel drive, so having the front axle unweighted is not good for handling or traction.
The WDH improves handling immensely.
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Old 12-20-2018, 03:10 PM   #6
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When towing my ~8,000 boat (and trailer, and stuff) with my '11 F-250 I needed a WDH as the truck's maximum tongue weight w/o a WDH was 600 pounds.

Since my F-250 was totaled by hail (a horrible death) I got a '17 F-350 that is supposed to handle 1,500 pounds tongue weight w/o a WDH. I'm looking forward to skipping (and selling) the WDH but I have no experience yet. Therefore I have no good advice.

You will generally find a sticker on the hitch describing it's limits.

I was looking for a replacement F-250 this past August and found a new '17 F-350 without the stuff that drives them to $60K or even $80K. I'm hoping that having a one-ton will simplify my towing.
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Old 12-20-2018, 03:53 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShelbyM View Post
Obviously this is opinion not fact, so read all you can and make your own decision.



I happen to disagree with your statement. I believe it closer to fact than anything else. But of course you can believe in the buggy man or anything else you want and do as you like. It would be nice if you pick the place to crash where there's nobody around to hurt.
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Old 12-20-2018, 04:36 PM   #8
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Anti-Sway Bar???

1. What is sway? It's when the trailer will move side to side in ever increasing swings.


2. What causes sway? Several thing the towing dynamics. The biggest problem is speed and front to back trailer weight distribution.



3. How is sway prevented? Insure that the weight in front other trailer axle is at least 60% of the total weight, with 40% behind the axle.


4. How does an anti-sway bar stop sway. It restricts the free movement of the ball to trailer hitch.



5. Does an anti-sway prevent sway? It might reduce the side to side movement, but if there's a tendency to sway without the anti-sway bar the problem has NOT been fixed. As such the problem is masked.



6. How is masking sway problem dangerous? At some point in speed and road conditions side to side traction can be lost and the trailer start skidding side to side. Since the joint movement is restricted the tow vehicle can be pulled around with the trailer even more than with no restriction. The whole can easily end up being on it side or upside down.



Hopefully many of you will be able to understand this and know why I say that an anti-sway bar "MASKS" a real problem.
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Old 12-20-2018, 05:01 PM   #9
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I'll ignore the snark and point out that you seem to be assuming those who choose to use an anti-sway bar are unable to properly configure their rigs and are "masking" some inherent instability. This is condescending and just plain wrong. Many of us use the bar as an extra aid in the event of an unforeseen event. In addition it tends to dampen the sideways push caused by passing semis, which makes for a more relaxed driving experience. I think everyone here recognizes this annoyance is unrelated to the sway caused by improper set up. Again, I encourage OP to do some research.
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Old 12-20-2018, 05:39 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShelbyM View Post
I'll ignore the snark and point out that you seem to be assuming those who choose to use an anti-sway bar are unable to properly configure their rigs and are "masking" some inherent instability. This is condescending and just plain wrong. Many of us use the bar as an extra aid in the event of an unforeseen event. In addition it tends to dampen the sideways push caused by passing semis, which makes for a more relaxed driving experience. I think everyone here recognizes this annoyance is unrelated to the sway caused by improper set up. Again, I encourage OP to do some research.
Like I said Believe what you like.
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Old 12-20-2018, 06:29 PM   #11
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No expert to say the least, and I am going to tow long distance next summer. From what I have read, the weight distribution hitches will help correct a problem concerning your tow capacity of vehicle and total weight of Trailer and any weight placed behind the rear axle of your tow vehicle and also the two bars that go back onto the frame will have a "Friction" plate to help with the sway of the trailer.

The Sway bar controller looks somewhat like a shock absorber and attaches from the little side ball on the hitch back to the frame and will stop sway only.
Some of these sway Bar controllers can be adjusted to what ever trailer weight your pulling.

I feel the 6000 lb tow capacity of my Tow Vehicle will not give any sag at the hitch when hooked up to the 3200 lb. Casita, so I plan to just go with the Sway Bar controller.
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Old 12-21-2018, 08:22 AM   #12
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Equalizer Bars

WDH does not correct a "problem" with the towing capacity of a vehicle. It corrects rear axle overload by shifting some of the tongue weight to the front axle and some to the trailer axle(s). The resulting set-up still needs to stay within all respective GVWR's, GAWR's, and the GCWR. Since WDH adds a fair bit of weight of its own, it's not a solution for an overweight towing situation. It restores front-rear balance for safe steering, braking, and handling, it levels out the rig for stability, and it prevents excessive wear on the rear suspension and tires from a heavy tongue load. WDH requires the receiver and frames be engineered and rated for the additional stresses.

Some WDH systems include integrated sway control; some do not. If not, you can add a separate sway control device if desired.
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Old 12-21-2018, 08:23 AM   #13
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Name: Bob Ruggles
Trailer: 2015 Escape
Michigan
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I donít use either but have had other trailers that needed and I used a wdh. Towing since 1962 Iíve never had any sway. One trailer I had came with the sway thing so I used it but felt that it wasnít needed. Since my trailer id an Escape19 and I tow with a Ram 1500 I neither need nor use a wdh or sway thing. My truck drops an inch when hitch making the whole package level. Tows wonderfully. Do what you feel you gotta do.
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Old 12-21-2018, 01:35 PM   #14
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Name: Russ
Trailer: Bigfoot
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In the end, I agree with Shelby....as an extra piece of assurance and relief on the back end of the truck. WD bars it is.

And...you wonder why people unsubscribe to some sites.
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