Fiberglass: gas vs diesels - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-23-2007, 08:07 AM   #15
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My 2500HD Diesel is an extremely comfortable long-range road vehicle— probably the most comfortable I have ever owned. It's as quiet, ,or quieter, than comparable gas trucks in the same class. I like the fact that I CANNOT overload this truck on a long trip. I also like the doctrine of "overwhelming force" it provides when towing in the mountains. I get 16.5-17.0 when towing and 18-20 when running without a trailer.

I have never had to search for fuel.

My biggest disappointment with the diesel is that when I bought the truck, diesel fuel was significantly cheaper than gas, and now that has reversed. Bummer.

I could have gotten out lots cheaper, but I am happy with my choice.
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Old 03-23-2007, 03:06 PM   #16
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QUESTIONS FOR ROGER:

re: the thread was about the significantly stiffer suspensions of one-ton trucks and the potential damage that can occur to a light weight trailer frame from jarring at the hitch ball without using an air-suspension hitch.

1. Does the same risk appy to a 3/4 ton truck such as F250 or Dodge 3500?

2. Would an air suspension hitch remove the risk?

3. How expensive are they?

4. Are such hitches usuable with any trailer regardless of size or material used (stick, fiberglass?
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Old 03-23-2007, 07:24 PM   #17
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On the maintenance issue, a Ford 6.8l V10 gas engine has a recommended oil change interval of 5,000 miles and takes 6 quarts of oil and a filter. The 7.3 V8 PowerStroke diesel engine has a recommended oil change interval of 10,000 miles and takes 19 quarts; a difference in cost of 7 more quarts of oil, but one less filter per 10,000 mile interval.
I see this as a good example of the difference between an engine which is supposed to be commercial-duty (the PowerStroke), and one derived from a lighter duty family (the Ford modular overhead-cam series). Nothing to do with the actual fuel or combustion cycle, but something that typically changes between the gas and diesel choices in a model range.
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Old 03-23-2007, 07:58 PM   #18
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Quote:
QUESTIONS FOR ROGER:

re: the thread was about the significantly stiffer suspensions of one-ton trucks and the potential damage that can occur to a light weight trailer frame from jarring at the hitch ball without using an air-suspension hitch.

1. Does the same risk appy to a 3/4 ton truck such as F250 or Dodge 3500?

2. Would an air suspension hitch remove the risk?

3. How expensive are they?

4. Are such hitches usuable with any trailer regardless of size or material used (stick, fiberglass?
Frank, you must have missed this post.

Roger
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Old 03-26-2007, 11:52 PM   #19
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"On the opposite side, if you want a diesel tow vehicle at present, it's got to be a pickup and perhaps a bigger one than you'd like. You pay for something you'd otherwise not buy (as in some cable TV "packages"). That money won't be as easy to recover upon resale.
That problem will disappear only when and if smaller diesels appear in SUVs and small pickups. "

If you can wait a few years, your problem may be solved. There's a wave of turbodiesel engines a-comin', wrapped up in small SUVs, too. Subaru has designed one, and VW is preparing a smaller, cheaper SUV with their excellent TDI engine (for less than half the price of the $70,000, 10-cylinder Touareg). One of those will probably replace my current "big car," AKA "gas hog," a Forester. It gets 25mpg alone and 18mpg under tow.

Driving a TDI Golf has shown me the delights of modern diesel power. I can burn renewable, American-made fuel. The 90-hp, 160 lb./ft. engine, all 1.9 liters of it, has terriffic passing power and great endurance at high altitides. The TDI gets 10-15 mpg more than our old gas Golf, despite being crippled with an automatic transmission that costs it about 7 mpg more. At speed, the diesel is as quiet and smooth as any non-electric car could be- much quieter than the gasser, which buzzed at high revs and cried out for the taller gearing that the TDI uses.

Please don't judge diesel engines by the roaring, clanking noises and clouds of toxic smoke that follow around the big diesel pickups Ford, GM or Chrysler. Those are an older generation of engines that belong on the ashheap of literally- literally.

Consult: http://dieselforecast.com
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Old 03-27-2007, 10:24 AM   #20
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Please don't judge diesel engines by the roaring, clanking noises and clouds of toxic smoke that follow around the big diesel pickups Ford, GM or Chrysler. Those are an older generation of engines that belong on the ashheap of literally- literally.

Consult: http://dieselforecast.com
I don't know what GM diesels you are referring to, but my Duramax does not roar, clank, or leave clouds of smoke.
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Old 03-27-2007, 11:36 AM   #21
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Frank,
Your 3rd premise is not necessarily true any longer. I was discussing this with my Toyota tech sons. They brought up a very interesting point. They have not experienced any worn-out engines on Tundras yet. Considering that they first appeared on the market in 1999 with the 2000 model year, there are some pretty high mileage trucks out there. My own is a case-in-point. With just shy of 200,000 miles. I would not hesitate towing our Casita cross-country and around the U.S.A. It may well be the last pick-up I own. There are many cases of them with well over 300,000 miles.
I have to admit, that better mileage would be "icing on the cake".
Another side to the coin is longevity of everything else on the vehicle. So far our Tundra is holding up well in that department as well.

Kurt & Ann K.
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Old 03-27-2007, 02:47 PM   #22
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If you can wait a few years, your problem may be solved. There's a wave of turbodiesel engines a-comin', wrapped up in small SUVs, too. Subaru has designed one, and VW is preparing a smaller, cheaper SUV with their excellent TDI engine (for less than half the price of the $70,000, 10-cylinder Touareg). One of those will probably replace my current "big car," AKA "gas hog," a Forester. It gets 25mpg alone and 18mpg under tow.
Jeep already has one, in the Liberty CRD - 2.8-Liter Turbo Diesel, still available in 2006 models but not 2007 it appears. It sports 160 HP and 300 lb-ft of torque.

"New" EPA fuel economy is 19 City / 23 Hwy / 21 Combined.

3.7L gas V6 (210 HP) is 15 City / 20 Hwy / 17 Combined.

Just thought I'd mention it, it seems to be the only Diesel vehicle in it's class.

Dave
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Old 03-29-2007, 01:43 AM   #23
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Dave, I'm not sure where you draw the lines on the Liberty's "class", but in a larger Jeep SUV you can get a Grand Cherokee with a 3.0 L turbodiesel (the 3.0 CRD). The Liberty's 2.8 (an entirely different engine) does not meet 2007 U.S. emission standards for diesel engines.
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