Going to the other side - Page 5 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 04-13-2013, 02:43 PM   #57
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I gotta agree with Steve in his original post.

In sticky's you can get a lot more trailer for the money, at least at initial purchase.

Our kids wanted a trailer big enough to sleep at least 6-8 that they could pull with a Surburban. We bought them a 17' Coleman Hybrid by Dutchman and, with both beds tipped out it sleeps up to 5 on the beds and 4 more on a couch & dinette. It came with a double door refrigerator, a huge bathroom with separate shower, heat, a/c, a stereo radio/CD/DVD player, a power awning, stove w/oven and out side accessible storage from side to side in front. And the dealer threw in a Hang-on BBQ.

All that for $14k and change.

Yep, in a few years it might be a lot worse for wear that an FGRV, but it will stay big long enough until the last of the Grandkids are tired of camping.

Different strokes for different folks I guess..... and what 17' (or any length for that matter) FGRV can sleep that many.
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Old 04-13-2013, 02:52 PM   #58
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I think I could manage 3 on the queen bed,
2 on the couch, 1 in the floor, and 3 under the bed with the spare.

But all that tossing and turning and snoring?............
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Old 04-13-2013, 02:56 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by carlkeigley View Post
I think I could manage 3 on the queen bed,
2 on the couch, 1 in the floor, and 3 under the bed with the spare.
Throwback to your college days, Carl?



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Old 04-13-2013, 03:07 PM   #60
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Well........back to when they called me "bean pole."
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Old 04-13-2013, 03:15 PM   #61
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When is the last time Scamp has done anything to update their trailer?
Steve, the Scamp factory burned in 2006, including all the molds, so everything they make is an update. I have a 1996 17 foot Casita and having looked at some newer ones, I can assure you that there have been many changes over the last 16 or 17 years. Everything from the water filler to placement of some of the cabinet doors has been refined. But there's no reason for the fiberglass manufacturers to come out with a new "model" every year, a la Chevy or Ford or Jayco. But if you want the "latest and greatest", then by all means head to your nearest sticky dealer.
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Old 04-13-2013, 03:25 PM   #62
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Each and every trailer has its advantages and disadvantages.

Wood Framed. The wood framed trailers are inexpensive and yes will rot if not taken care of - but they are remarkably easy to repair by most people and rv repair centers.

New one piece roofs that bend over the side walls go a long way to avoiding leaks in critical areas. Wood framing allows an easy entry into the rv world and the inexpensive larger sizes allow whole families to get out and enjoy North America.

If stick built trailers are such a problem, how come nobody worries about stick built houses?

Aluminum Framing. Aluminum framing is a step up and helps prevent rot in the basic structure - but costs more.

Molded Fiberglass. Molded fiberglass has the advantage that the basic structure is almost impervious to water - but water can still get in through vents, openings and windows - causing much the same damage to paneling, wood furniture and floors.

Molded fiberglass units tend to be somewhat less luxurious - that's important to some folks.

Molded fiberglass units tend to be smaller and more expensive - too small and expensive for many families. The long life expectancy is a real advantage - many of the folks here seem to be renovating older, cheaper units rather than buying new. A personal observation - while some of these renovations result in like new units (some of the work shown on this site is truly amazing), many do not achieve anything like that result.


Anyway, I think that the long and the short of it boils down to: Do your research and buy what you like and can reasonably afford. Take care of your purchase by turning trailer maintenance into part of your routine and enjoy it - it is all part of the hobby and a great topic of conversation with like minded individuals -many of which you can find right here.
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Old 04-13-2013, 03:52 PM   #63
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Great summation, GP.

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Old 04-13-2013, 04:18 PM   #64
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Yupp, to GPJ...Already decided myself that we are moving on from molded fiberglass. For vacation use our boler is a great trailer. It suited our needs in regards to our tow vehicle at the time. We are moving towards being part timer snow birds and have a much better tow vehicle now. Bigfoot and escape do not seem to have the floorplan we like at a cost we are prepared to pay. My boler can be sold at a price that will buy a bigger trailer only a few years old, not 30+ years. We want a queen size bed and a bit bigger kitchen and bathroom. Something in the range of 20-24' long max and light like 4-5000 pounds or so. Price range $10-15000. I also like the newer trailers with laminated fiberglass/foam with aluminum frames. To each their own but I will be going to the dark side eventually.
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Old 04-13-2013, 04:24 PM   #65
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If we can't talk you out of it - Jump!

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Old 04-13-2013, 04:32 PM   #66
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Quote:
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If we can't talk you out of it - Jump!


Meanwhile, outside Tom's window:



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Old 04-13-2013, 05:04 PM   #67
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Originally Posted by Rene View Post
Yupp, to GPJ...Already decided myself that we are moving on from molded fiberglass. For vacation use our boler is a great trailer. It suited our needs in regards to our tow vehicle at the time. We are moving towards being part timer snow birds and have a much better tow vehicle now. Bigfoot and escape do not seem to have the floorplan we like at a cost we are prepared to pay. My boler can be sold at a price that will buy a bigger trailer only a few years old, not 30+ years. We want a queen size bed and a bit bigger kitchen and bathroom. Something in the range of 20-24' long max and light like 4-5000 pounds or so. Price range $10-15000. I also like the newer trailers with laminated fiberglass/foam with aluminum frames. To each their own but I will be going to the dark side eventually.
We love ya' any how..............!!!
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Old 04-13-2013, 05:13 PM   #68
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Would a Park Model be better for snowbirding?
I saw more trailer houses in Florida than campers.
One RV park we called had a lot of trailer houses and [2] RV spots.
I sure those 2 spots stay booked up?

I went to school in Florida, but have never cared for Florida.
That's why there are different strokes.................

OOPS!............Nope!........Park Models are $$$$pricey$$$$

http://www.campingworld.com/rvsales/Park-Model/14/
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Old 04-13-2013, 05:30 PM   #69
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Park models are also not made for regular travel- they're set up to be moved occasionally, but nothing more. They don't, for example, usually have holding tanks or even interior 12v electric systems.

If one's planning to do more than just haul it from north to south and vice versa each year, I'd advise against a park model.

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Old 04-13-2013, 05:37 PM   #70
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Quote from post #68 "causing much the same damage to paneling, wood furniture and floors"
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Not totally true. You can submerge most FGRV's and still have something to build anew with. I have seen all to many sticky's with entire walls falling apart, roofs collapsed and cab-over sections drooping from water and ice damage. With fiberglass the basic shell usually survives. Take a 10 y.o. sticky to a dealer with more than minor water damage and it is "totaled". Yes, the windows, doors and roof hatches can also leak on a FGRV, but the structural damage from water leaks seen in sticky's doesn't occur.
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