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Old 11-28-2005, 11:36 PM   #29
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The one really nice thing about GPS systems is that it will always take you from where you are, even if you don't know where that is , to where you want to go.
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Old 12-01-2005, 09:12 PM   #30
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We have had a GPS since 2002 ,but never had much luck useing it on trips because we always knew where we were going. Thanksgiving week end our DD took us Geocaching ! What great fun ..we are now Hooked,big time......what a great hobby to add to camping and Kayaking! I would highly recomend you get one & learn to use it ( yes,keep the paper maps & compass as back up) but hikes in the woods looking for "treasure" is so very much fun. Lynn
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Old 12-01-2005, 10:21 PM   #31
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Quote:
We have had a GPS since 2002 ,but never had much luck useing it on trips because we always knew where we were going. Thanksgiving week end our DD took us Geocaching ! What great fun ..we are now Hooked,big time......what a great hobby to add to camping and Kayaking! I would highly recomend you get one & learn to use it ( yes,keep the paper maps & compass as back up) but hikes in the woods looking for "treasure" is so very much fun. Lynn
I agree that geocaching is a lot of fun. We've been geocaching since April 2001.
We've gone to more neat places that would not have found if not for geocaching. Any interested here's the web site. <a href="http://www.geocaching.com" target="_blank"><a href="http://www.geocaching.com" target="_blank"><a href="http://www.geocaching.com" target="_blank"><a href="http://www.geocaching.com" target="_blank"><a href="http://www.geocaching.com" target="_blank"><a href="http://www.geocaching.com" target="_blank">http://www.geocaching.com</a></a></a></a></a></a>

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Old 12-02-2005, 08:37 AM   #32
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We now have 2 GPS units, bought mainly for geocaching after discovering the hobby in 2001, gets us out and about. 1 is a mapping GPS and recently bought an older laptop for use in the car along with Garmin MapSource, great for getting to caches or an address. So I would have to agree, the GPS is a great asset when travelling and geocaching gets us out there. In fact the maiden voyage of our Scamp was to a geocaching event and as our camping vacations usually revolve around geocaching, the Scamp was a perfect compliment. Especially now that we will soon have an addition to the family.
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Old 12-02-2005, 09:33 AM   #33
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Chester,
When I retired in 2002, my fellows gave me a Garmin eTrex Legend. I was expecting a gold watch but they thought better of that when I told them that I was going to Alaska. They were aware that getting lost is one thing that I can do better than most. Learning to use the eTrex was a real challenge for someone who never learned to program a VCR. Setting it to read out my speed and mileage in kilometers came in handy while driving in Canada and with sticky cup windshield mount, I didn't have to take my eyes off the road. A GPS is really just one more distraction that for safety sake is better left to a copilot. I still managed to drive past my turn onto 97C and ended up in downtown Kelowna, on BC Day. Not fun! I was watching the road signs and remembered seeing a sign pointing to Merritt but somehow it didn't register as a place I wanted to go. I got back on track only to discover that Highway 97C was so new that it wasn't even in the Garman map database. That little side trip did prove that my new GPS would not interfere with my innate ability to get lost. I did manage to learn GPS basics by the time I got to Whitehorse but buy then it is hard to get lost. There are only three highway choices out of Whitehorse and all lead to Alaska. I got a kick out of watching the GPS as I approached the Artic Circle for the first time and knowing the monument is located as a matter of convenience rather than for accuracy. The GPS was a fun toy and good companion on a long trip but it is no substitute for up to date paper maps, a good compass and odometer.
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Old 12-02-2005, 11:09 AM   #34
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Hi Craig
I agree with you.I like maps.Had lots of that training in army.I do like the idea of Geo cache,(I think thats right)I can see where it would be fun.
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Old 12-02-2005, 11:43 AM   #35
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If you're a geek and against your better nature you get outside...geocaching is geeky fun.

If you're a parent with a teenage kid that wouldn't be caught dead being seen with you in public... This might get you together for a bit if you let them operate the GPS. (If you're not sure they won't run off and leave you in the woods, better bring your own GPS as well!)

If you used to do Orienteering, that'll stand you in good stead and you might like geocaching.

If you bought the GPS and haven't used it yet, it's a techno-hip kinda thing to do. Pick a cache that's a 1/1 for difficulty/terrain. No sense going nuts right out of the box.
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Old 12-02-2005, 11:47 AM   #36
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If you're a geek and against your better nature you get outside...geocaching is geeky fun.

If you're a parent with a teenage kid that wouldn't be caught dead being seen with you in public... This might get you together for a bit if you let them operate the GPS. (If you're not sure they won't run off and leave you in the woods, better bring your own GPS as well!)

If you used to do Orienteering, that'll stand you in good stead and you might like geocaching.

If you bought the GPS and haven't used it yet, it's a techno-hip kinda thing to do. Pick a cache that's a 1/1 for difficulty/terrain. No sense going nuts right out of the box.

Good points
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Old 12-04-2005, 09:47 PM   #37
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We've been geocaching since April 2001.
That predates me by several months. Besides geocaching there are other fun GPS games such as, to name my favorites, Geodashing and Benchmark Hunting. There is also Orienteering which is a great outdoor sport for all ages although it doesn't use the GPS.
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Old 12-08-2005, 01:21 AM   #38
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we have been using DeLorme maps for several years with a GPS. the mapping program with the gps is about $130. first time and about $40./ year for upgrades.
have been back and forth across the us 3 times in the last 3 years and must say it has saved us a lot of time and miles. we have been to all 48 lower states and of course always for the first time.....so it is always new country and new suprises. not on subject...but we also have a CB to warn of upcoming problems and have now added a scanner that almost removes the need for the CB.
this year we upgraded the gps for nominal amount....cant tell the diff.
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Old 12-08-2005, 06:29 AM   #39
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Scanners are illegal to use in an automobile in some states, subject to immediate confiscation and destruction (not unlike radar detectors which are illegal in fewer states). Often, there is an exemption for licensed ham operators and some states offer a form to get an exception.

Might be wise to check your state.

Scanner Laws

This site offers radar detector information as well.
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Old 12-08-2005, 10:48 AM   #40
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Thanks Steve...will check that out. we head for philidelphia in july so will pay attention.
btw: we met in kentucky....3 years ago?
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Old 12-09-2005, 09:25 PM   #41
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My wife and I are amateur mushroom hunters (Colorado Mycological Society). I find my Magellan Gold GPS receiver invaluable for this activity. For starters, whenever I plan to march off into the woods to hunt 'shrooms (which involves lots of "aimless" wandering with eyes focused on the ground), I always waypoint (mark) the starting point of our hunt (usually my truck). That way if I become disoriented during the hunt, I can use my GPS to find my way back to the starting point. My other use for the GPS in 'shrooming is to mark really good mushroom finds so that I can return there later. We also enjoy using our GPS receiver for geocaching, particularly during the off season for mushrooms or on bad hunting days.

Just an aside, but another set of tools that we use for safety in mushroom hunting is a pair of walkie talkies so that we can keep in touch and find each other when separated during the hunt. In the past we relied on whistles (mine a English bobby police whistle) to contact each other and we still carry them in addition to the walkie talkies.
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