How long can you go?? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-29-2006, 08:49 PM   #15
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Trailer: 74 13 ft Boler and 79 17 ft Boler
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My wife and I have taken 2- six week vacations in our 13' Boler and haven`t had cabin fever....or at least she never told me about it, and this summer was to be about 2-3 months but it never materialized ....so maybe next year we will have another long trip.....we move almost every day on the road , so possibly that`s why it seems that the time span doesn`t matter......the longest we`ve been out with our 17' was about 4 days and stayed in one spot......really prefered the 13' and move more often....also 95 % of the time we stay in elec. & water sites.....Benny
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Old 10-30-2006, 12:28 AM   #16
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in our 16 ft egg we lasted 12 days just to small for two people to be in for any amount of time in our 26 ft sunline tt 30 days ran out of things to do were buying a new jayco 1206 pop up camper with a slide out dinett this spring and were going to see how long we can go in it..it has 2 queen size beds shower and toilet couch sink stove fridge and room to move around so we will see still looking for the perfect scamp 5er after the last one fell threw..some day i hope

Dan
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Old 10-30-2006, 06:10 AM   #17
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Almost 5 years ago we (2 of us) spent 5 months travelling from Nova Scotia to Florida to Texas to California and back (and all points between) in our 15 foot Trillium.

Two weeks after we started (while in Florida), we rescued an abandoned mistreated dog from a state park that didn't allow dogs and was trying to catch it to "put it down".
The original idea was to find her a good home.
For the next 4 1/2 months all 3 of us travelled in the 15 foot Trillium
She, like us loves to travel as it turned out.
For all of us, it was 99% perfect. . Not too small as we spend lots of time outside.
We like our own cooking so that was fine. (no motels and very few eats out) Seeking out of the way places down small roads possible because of the rig. Convincing dawg that the bed was too small for 3 of us was a constant but we worked it out eventually.

And if we were to say anything about long time travel in a small rig ( with rising gas prices guarenteed)..... we can hardly wait to do it again....but for longer.
So when life allows us the possibility again, we will see you all on the road!
Donna, Lance, and Dixie Dawg
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Old 10-30-2006, 06:43 AM   #18
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Don't stop writing. I'm really learning much from your replies. I like the idea of the fixed bed vs having to mess with it morning and night. That explains the pics with thick matresses.

I'm leaning towards the 13' model, less weight, lighter, no brakes (?), cheaper (?) and a model without a toilet. I think if I want to move up, I should have few problems unloading the 13'. They seem to sell FAST.

I plan on using good ol' KOA a lot, clean facilities, laundry, etc. My truck has a covered bed for storage of additional items.

Most of my trips will be two to four nights at a single location and then off to another. I'm using my aunt Connies approach to road trips and plan about 300 miles a day driving. Then put in to a spot on my agenda or just resting a night before moving on. I do believe constant movement, several stops in a week, will cut down on boredom.

Keep the info flowing. I love it.
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Old 10-30-2006, 09:26 AM   #19
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Yes, how long can you last?
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Old 10-30-2006, 09:33 AM   #20
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The fixed bed was a given for us, so that after a strenuous hike to explore the area we visited we could plop down to get off our feet for a while. Messing with converting a setup would be an aggravation at that point.

The toilet issue has points both for and against. Ours came with it, and as older folks we appreciate it greatly because it is available without fuss at anytime and anywhere. No hunting for gas stations, etc. A porta-potti could serve the same purpose, of course. The shower which usually comes with it can be totally refreshing when used after a long day of traveling or exploring. Using KOA and the like for us is generally only done as a last resort, the more primitive and rustic the campground the better.

Our bed is very comfortable, and we learned early to beg off sleeping in the homes of friends and relatives we visit. Hard sometimes to convince them without causing irritation. On the long trip I mentioned we relented once for a couple of days. The bed was OK, but not ours, and we had two nights of virtually no sleep. The upside was that we have been able to use this as an example of why we always decline to take our hosts up on their gracious offers. They understand.

Holding tanks have limited size, so some planning is useful (tank gauges help) to avoid getting caught unprepared. Two propane tanks with automatic changeover valve keep propane levels from ever entering the anxiety zone.
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Old 10-30-2006, 10:43 AM   #21
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I think that the biggest thing on "how long" is attitude. If you're going out to be out (outside of trailer) and enjoy being out then longer would work. If you're going out to be in (inside of trailer) and would rather be inside something, then you probably won't be able to stay out as long.

It's also a matter of how you travel or not travel. In my backpacking days the general rule was 2 or 3 days of travel, then a day of rest. The reason for the 2 or 3 was that if you found yourself in a very nice spot on day 2 you stayed an extra day. If not you went on.

Another thing about attitude if you've set yourself a schedule you'll probably have a bit of a problem. No schedule means stop when you want, visit a place you might have passed by. Don't gage you trip by the miles but by the experiences.

Before trailer some of the best trips were totally unplanned. We'd decide at the end of the drive way which direction we were going to go. Then make those kind of decissions the rest of the trip. And we changed our minds on stops and destinations often in route.
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Old 10-30-2006, 11:35 AM   #22
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It's up to the individual(s) concerned -- I went three years in my Jayco 16' before I found my Scamp 13' and then went another six years -- But there's a key element in FullTiming; you don't have something else waiting for you somewhere else, so you are not constantly making comparisons.
Pete,

I forget, do you have a bathroom in your 13 footer?

Also, if you will, tell us how you feel about traveling costs, ie camping costs, traveling (gas) costs. How do you save money while full timing?
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Old 10-30-2006, 04:33 PM   #23
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...I'm leaning towards the 13' model, less weight, lighter, [b]no brakes (?), cheaper (?) and a model without a toilet...
I can see how both legal requirements and the truck's ratings might lead to the conclusion that brakes are not required with a typical under-2000lb 13' trailer; however, I think they're still a good idea. I suggest doing some searching in this forum on that subject. I can't see the cost and effort to set up the trailer and truck for electric brakes as a significant factor for a trailer which is expected to be so heavily used.

I would be interested to hear if anyone has towed a 13' and a 16' which are otherwise similar (e.g. Scamp 13' versus Scamp 16', or Casita 13' versus Casita 16') to see if there is much difference in fuel consumption. Acceleration and hill-climbing will vary with the weight, regardless of the length, but I suspect that fuel consumption will change very little.

Especialy with long trips in mind, I go back to the idea that the trailer must suit the owner's requirements, because enjoying the trip has to be more important than any other factor. Enjoyment might be tied to ease of handling (favouring a smaller trailer), or space (favouring a larger one), but likely has little to do with small differences in performance.
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Old 10-30-2006, 07:02 PM   #24
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I can see how both legal requirements and the truck's ratings might lead to the conclusion that brakes are not required with a typical under-2000lb 13' trailer; however, I think they're still a good idea. I suggest doing some searching in this forum on that subject. I can't see the cost and effort to set up the trailer and truck for electric brakes as a significant factor for a trailer which is expected to be so heavily used.

I would be interested to hear if anyone has towed a 13' and a 16' which are otherwise similar (e.g. Scamp 13' versus Scamp 16', or Casita 13' versus Casita 16') to see if there is much difference in fuel consumption. Acceleration and hill-climbing will vary with the weight, regardless of the length, but I suspect that fuel consumption will change very little.

Especialy with long trips in mind, I go back to the idea that the trailer must suit the owner's requirements, because enjoying the trip has to be more important than any other factor. Enjoyment might be tied to ease of handling (favouring a smaller trailer), or space (favouring a larger one), but likely has little to do with small differences in performance.

My guess there would be an increase in fuel consumption. The longer the trailer the more room for stuff. Stuff has weight which increases the tow weight even more. The axium that stuff will expand to fill all available space comes into play here. Increased tow weight = increase fuel consumption, at least I would think so.
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Old 10-30-2006, 08:51 PM   #25
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I found that, in my experience that the possible major factor in fuel consumption was the wind load on the front of a trailer as opposed to the weight.....used to pull a car on an open trailer, and later put on a 3 ft. x 7 ft. wide flat vertical front with an additional 1 ft. height at 45 degrees to protect the front of the car.....later noticed that it was easier to tow the car and trailer at highway speeds without the front, than an empty trailer with the front.....the wind load was tremendous with just the front.....never actually properly compared fuel usage but the truck really had to work to pull the empty trailer at 60+ mph speeds and noticed a large increase in fuel to run the same distances .....in the last two years I find a large difference between the 13' Boler and the 17' Boler in towing.....with the 17' which has a larger frontal area, my current truck usually won`t go into overdrive even on flat land with the slightest headwind....with the 13' I can tow in OD pretty well anywhere and at higher speeds...Benny
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Old 11-03-2006, 01:42 AM   #26
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Our bed is very comfortable, and we learned early to beg off sleeping in the homes of friends and relatives we visit. Hard sometimes to convince them without causing irritation. On the long trip I mentioned we relented once for a couple of days. The bed was OK, but not ours, and we had two nights of virtually no sleep. The upside was that we have been able to use this as an example of why we always decline to take our hosts up on their gracious offers. They understand.
Folks do get a bit miffed if they offer hospitality and you don't accept it -- I learned to respond to the invite with "Have the folks next door ever visted or been to dinner?" "Yes" "Did they spend the nite?" "No, they live right next door." "Well, my home is even closer because it's in your driveway...".

Mike, how much one spends depends on how frugal one is and what one needs -- Since I am set up to run on battery (no fridge and no furnace fan) and tank water, plus I like rustic CGs, I generally avoid expensive hook-up CGs (plus I have a GA card, so the Federal CGs are half price).

I have a porta-potti for rain or emergencies and use CG facilities, plus take sponge baths (diaper wipes aren't just for babies, you know )
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Old 11-08-2006, 03:11 AM   #27
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Trailer: 2005 16 ft Casita Spirit Deluxe / 1996 Dakota 4x4 V6
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Drews60...
Been aboard for two years as of Sept 20 save for one night. Can't imagine how other people live/travel anymore.
My coach has furnace, bathroom/shower, fridge, etc etc and it is all used daily just like any other house or apartment. I don't understand giving up basic conveniences in order to be camping/mobile.
I fill up with water every day, dump the grey every day, dump the black every week, fill a propane tank about every two weeks, and keep an eye on other maintenance items. I added a solar panel that brings me to full charge by about 2pm every day.
I've got wifi, TV/DVD, and PlayStation, and plenty to read every day.
With the 16' SD, I leave one table up and the other space is the bed. (I alternate depending on task.)
My Dodge has the 3.9l V6 and has plenty of power for towing the 16', but it is getting old and I can't wait to trade the accursed thing in for a Chevrolet.
I guess that adds up to about 800 days so far, and I continue to be delighted every day!
Best of Luck
P
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Old 11-08-2006, 06:14 AM   #28
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When I was a kid, my family took a 10 week vacation in a 13' Shasta and NEVER went into a motel.

My hubby and I camp for 3 weeks every summer in a 1978 VW Westfalia. Never have found it too small.

We manage because we do all activities outside as long as the weather cooperates. And, we move every day.

Depending on where you are camping, there is more to do than we have time allocated to do it.

Most of the time, we stay at state or national parks with a few KOA's thrown in. Generally, we don't like KOA's because they are normally right by expressways and are too noisey.

We have a pack-a-potty that takes care of the midnight strolls to the washroom. Our rule for the potty is that only "liquids" allowed after dark. The rest of the time, you have to walk to the restroom.

For camp places with no showers, in warm weather, we have a hose type thing that woman used to use to wash their hair at the sink. We put our bathing suit on and walk over to the water pump (at dusk or dark) and take our shower there. Yes, it is cool/cold water but getting the sweat and dirt off makes you feel wonderful. I have even taken a "2 liter" shower at Big Bend National Park (wet down, soap up then rinse off).

If you start to feel cramped, go into a motel room - it does help.
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