How to trailer camp - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-26-2015, 09:33 PM   #15
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Congratulations on your "new to you" camping trailer! I'm sure you have many happy camping trips ahead of you. Basically, I would say your mottos should be "less is more" and "KISS" (Keep It Simple Sweetie). We have an icebox in our Scamp AND, on longer trips, bring a basic cooler. The extreme coolers are too big and heavy as our tow vehicle is a sedan. We do put the block of ice on the floor of the icebox and put a wire shelf over the ice thereby keeping most food out of the water bath. Bsically, a block of ice lasts about 3 days whether in the icebox or the cooler. http://www.containerstore.com/s/cabi...itchen%20shelf

A few comments...
The Dollar Stores can be your camping friend as they have foods, storage containers, kitchen supplies and children's entertainment for only $1 each.
Pack: Give each family member one duffle bag in which to pack all their clothing needs. Duffles, because they are made of cloth, can be pushed and shoved into any space. A 24" duffle should suffice for adults OUTDOOR Deluxe Duffel Bag and Pouch - Medium - SportsAuthority.com and a smaller one for children Outdoor Products Deluxe Small Duffel. Each person may also have a small daypack We'll be back! /processProductsCatalog?mode=Searching&sku=14%2F202 or Large Bright Drawstring Backpacks in which to pack entertainment such as books, coloring, music, games, etc. The daypacks can be used for day outings and for nature hikes. Pack small items such as socks, underwear, etc. in net drawstring bags Mesh Beach Bags.

Pack clothing by rolling each piece or, for the children, roll up an outfit; shirt, underwear, socks, pants, into a bundle. Use a hairband/rubberband to bundle. It's amazing how easily you can find your clothing when it's rolled. Each person can have a mesh bag to use as a personal laundry bag.

Cook:
Keep the foods simple and familiar. Foods I bring camping, for convenience, but rarely use at home are packaged salad and/or coleslaw, TANG, powdered milk, granola, Snickers candy bars, See's candy chocolate lollipops, canned vegetables and fruits, packaged pre-popped popcorn and beef jerky. Fresh foods that keep well are cabbage, iceberg (head) lettuce, carrots, celery, onions, potatoes, apples, oranges and eggs, raw or cooked in this container (http://www.amazon.com/Snap-Stack-Foo.../dp/B005PQAIVA). I use the cheapest, thin paper plates to put on our camping dishes. Clean-up is a breeze as a result.
Breakfast might be cereal and milk. Cook French toast, pancakes or eggs one morning. I almost hate to admit I like TANG "instant orange juice" while camping (but I never drink it otherwise) It is not sold many places, but I have found it at Lucky and at Latino grocery stores.
Lunch: Pack it in the morning and put it into each person's backpack. PB & J, apple, chips, veggies & cookie. Trail Mix or GORP (good 'ol raisins and peanuts) is great to eat on the trail.
Dinner: Camping favorites such as chili, hamburgers, chicken with salad, potato, veggies and dessert.
Storage:
3 different color milk crates http://www.containerstore.com/s?q=mi...tes&submit=are great to store foods; i.e. Yellow= Breakfasts and snacks, Red= lunches and Blue=dinners & desserts. Plastic shoe boxes http://www.containerstore.com/s/our-...q=shoe%20boxes are great to store small things such as salt (put dry rice in the salt shaker) and pepper shakers, seasonings, desserts, etc.

These are just a few ideas for your family. I hope they are a help.
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Old 10-26-2015, 09:35 PM   #16
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We do put the block of ice on the floor of the icebox and put a wire shelf over the ice thereby keeping most food out of the water bath. Bsically, a block of ice lasts about 3 days whether in the icebox or the cooler. http://www.containerstore.com/s/cabi...itchen%20shelf
Oops! I meant "cooler" not icebox.
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Old 10-26-2015, 11:42 PM   #17
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How's this for multi-purpose? 'Almost as good as a Swiss Army knife...
Liquid soap can be used for washing dishes, clothes, hair, body and most anything. You do not need separate products! Personally I like "Camp Soap" available at most outdoor stores. Liquid Dr. Bronner's Organic Pure Castile soap comes in various fragrances. Peppermint is usually the least expensive but has a potent smell and a bit of a "sting" in private parts. Lavender scent is quite nice. Castille soap is available at Trader Joe's, some other grocery stores, health food stores and more.

The manufacturer of Dr. Bronner's claims that there are 18 uses for the soap as follows!


1. SHAVING
Dilute one part liquid castile soap to two parts of water and massage into skin as a shaving lubricant.
2. SHAMPOO
Wet hair thoroughly and massage a small amount of liquid castile soap into your hands until a lather forms. Wash hair and rinse well.
3. DENTAL CLEANING
Put a single drop on your toothbrush (almond, peppermint, and citrus are nice flavours to use) and brush and rinse as per usual. This is great for sensitive teeth and gums, and will also clean dentures effectively.
4. BODY WASH
Wet skin and massage a small amount onto a cloth, loofah or sponge then wash and exfoliate at the same time. You can also just apply directly to the skin – you only need a tiny amount!
5. HOT TOWEL MASSAGE
For facial packs, scalp and soothing body rub, add a dash of liquid castile soap on a bath towel in sink of hot water. Wring the towel out and place it over the face & scalp. Massage with your fingertips. Repeat on each area of the body until the arms, legs & entire body have been massaged (using light strokes towards the heart.) Rinse the towel in plain hot water and massage again. Breathe deeply! Choose whichever scent makes your heart sing.
6. BATHING
Add a squirt to a bath tub of water at the beginning for bubbles, or after the bath has been drawn for a relaxing soak without bubbles. Rose is a divine fragrance for this use.
7. DEODORANT
Add 1-2ml (0.05 fl oz) to a spray bottle of water (125ml/4.2 fl oz) along with a teaspoon of Himalayan crystal salt for best results. Rose, Citrus, Lavender or Tea Tree are effective – or just choose whichever scent appeals from the range of eight!
8. BREATH FRESHENER
One or two drops in a spray bottle containing 50-125ml (1.7-4.2 fl oz) of distilled water helps to keep the breath fresh and prevent unhealthy bacteria from thriving in the gums and between the teeth. Peppermint, tea-tree, eucalyptus or citrus are great choices.
9. MOUTH WASH
Add 1 drop to a shot glass of water, swish and rinse. Peppermint, tea-tree, eucalyptus or citrus are great choices.
10. BABY WASH
Add a drop or two to a wet washcloth, or a couple of drops to the bathwater. Baby Mild is ideal as it is completely natural and fragrance-free.
11. AFTER-SHAVE
One or two drops in a spray bottle containing 50-125ml (1.7-4.2 fl oz) of distilled water helps to invigorate the skin and prevent shaving rash. Peppermint, Eucalyptus, or Tea Tree work well, or Baby Mild for sensitive skins.
12. HAND SOAP
Dilute anywhere from 1 part castile soap to 4 parts water through to 1:1. You can also use the full strength soap with a foaming dispenser. Any scent is ideal for this application.
13. FOOT SOAK
Add a tablespoon (15ml/0.5 fl oz) to a foot bath and relax! Peppermint is a great choice for hard or cracked heels, or use Tea Tree if fungal infections are a concern.
14. LAUNDRY WASH
For the laundry, use 1/4 cup (62.5ml) for top-loading machines (1/8 cup for front loaders – 31.3ml); adjust as needed depending on hardness of water. Adding a dash of baking soda may also help. Great for nappy washing, as it is all natural and won’t contribute to nappy-rash. Also delicate enough to use for hand wash items, such as silks and wool. Any scent works well, or unscented if you prefer.
15. PET WASH
Wet the coat of your pet thoroughly first then apply the liquid castile soap by massaging a small amount in your hands first until a lather is formed, then washing the hair/fur and rinsing clean afterwards. Can also be added to the wash water for ease of use (one squirt is plenty). Choose a stronger scent to help deter fleas and ticks, or Baby Mild if your pet has very sensitive skin.
16. FRUIT & VEGETABLE RINSE
Fill the sink with water and add a squirt of liquid castile soap to remove most chemical residues from fruit and vegetables. Baby Mild (unscented) is the best choice.
17. PEST SPRAY
Use 1-2 tablespoons/about 23ml per litre (0.7 fl oz per quart) of water in a spray bottle for garden pests (4-6 tablespoons per gallon). Citrus, Lavender, or Baby Mild work well.
18. HOUSEHOLD CLEANER
Dilute from one part soap into 40 parts water for light cleaning, to 1:1 or full strength for heavy-duty grease-dissolving jobs. Lavender, Citrus, Peppermint, Eucalyptus, Tea Tree work well – although Almond, Rose and Baby Mild are also great choices if you prefer those scents in your house (almond is a favourite around here – it smells just like marzipan!).
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Old 10-26-2015, 11:48 PM   #18
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Bet you could also use it to launder money.
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Old 10-27-2015, 12:01 AM   #19
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We camp with our family of four (1 and 4 year olds). We have a 72 gallon Coleman xtrme for food and a 48 gallon Coleman xtrme for drinks. We chose to get two, since drinks are accessed much more frequently, and also can be warm and not spoil in general. Both lasted us a Thursday to Tuesday camping trip at 80° with ice still left floating in the water on the way home.

We do cook inside...keeps the kids out of the cooking way.
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Old 10-27-2015, 06:05 AM   #20
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just a note on coolers. i recently replaced my beat up 10 year old igloo but not before a lot of internet research. all those sites that tested coolers agreed that the yeti would, in fact, keep ice longer. the surprise 2nd place cooler was the coleman stainless steel model. one said something like "sure, the yeti will keep ice 2 days longer, but, for the price of the same capicity yeti you can buy 8 colemans". well, it was a no brainer for me and i bought a coleman. i'm nearing the end of a month (or so) trip and i'm happy to report the coleman is a seriously good cooler for around a hundred bucks.

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Old 10-27-2015, 07:52 AM   #21
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We use a steel coleman, had it for about 25 years, actually we have two, but our son used it for fishing, now my wife won`t use it. Ice will last a long time in it. I keep on saying, I got to get one of those racks so pkg. stuff doesn't get wet, but never do. Carl
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Old 10-27-2015, 08:16 AM   #22
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My mother used to tell us to "travel light, carry money". We make do with a cooler filled with ice, a George Foreman grill, and an electric hot water pot. It's amazing how many meals you can make on the grill or with boiled water. Maybe not gourmet meals, but everything tastes better when you're camping! We also carry a small propane can fueled stove, but have yet to use it. The last thing I want to do is wash pots, pans, or dishes while on a camping adventure.
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Old 10-27-2015, 10:26 AM   #23
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We use a Coleman extreme cooler. To solve the melting ice problem, we purchased a plastic tub with lid that is just a fraction bigger than the block of ice. It keeps most of the water away from the rest of the cooler. Anything we need really cold is put in with the ice, and meat and dairy is always stored on and around the container. If you use crushed ice many people put a rack on top of the ice to stop everything from actually sitting in the ice.
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:24 AM   #24
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Here is site I always check before making a purchase:

The Best Hard Cooler | The Sweethome
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:29 AM   #25
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"My mother used to tell us to "travel light, carry money".


Or


"Take half as many clothes and twice as much money as you think you will need"
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Old 10-27-2015, 01:16 PM   #26
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Hi, All,
Good topic, lots of good questions and advice. We're considering right now how simple or fancy to go when we get the Amerigo redone...we're leaning toward very simple. As many have pointed out, start simple and add as you need it.
We're even thinking of naming the rig "OneStepUp" as in: one step from the ground, one step up from a tent, and there's a little step across the middle of the trailer. Liked hearing about how other tenters are moving to trailer camping.


U
OneStep




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Old 10-27-2015, 02:42 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
Here is site I always check before making a purchase: The Best Hard Cooler | The Sweethome
That's the one! I agree that it's a great value, currently $43 at Walmart. I also like the simple rectangular box, uninterrupted by wheel housings. Its size and lack of wheels does mean that when it's fully loaded, I usually call for an assistant to carry it.
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Old 10-27-2015, 03:12 PM   #28
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Lightbulb

Greetings K and welcome to the forum : )

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrillSLC View Post
...We want to keep our camper and camping experience lightweight, fast and simple...Most of our trips will be 2 or 3 nights.
IMO, with "Most" of your trips of such a short duration, your set up could really be "lightweight, fast and simple". Since your rig has a built in stove and sink, and if you don't want to duplicate appliances... open the windows and door on those warm days and cook inside. With any type of breeze the interior shouldn't heat up to much. But if you don't mind duplication grab a simple camp stove and head outside. We have used the simple approach in all our rigs (in our case a simple butane stove). If it is good enough to be an option on a $100K Sportsmobile van... it's good enough for our setup.

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...Q - Do you cook out doors?
Cooking outdoors is our preferred mode as we enjoy it. We only have a single portable stove (the one at the above butane stove link). And can cook indoors or out.

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...Q - If you cook outdoors, do you have an fold away table to cook on?
We have two of the folding tables Carol mentioned, and a rollup aluminum table like this one. We use it nearly every trip.


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...Q - If you don't have a fridge, where do you keep your cooler when your on the road and in camp? Is a fridge worth the $700 investment? Is a high end cooler (Yeti?) worth the $350+ investment?
My wife and I camp mostly in what might be considered "Bear Country", that said, if a ranger sees a campsite with coolers outside they better be Certified Bear Resistant by the IGBC. It is a several hundred dollar fine they can impose on the unsuspecting camper. Soooo.... We had a Yeti, but sold it and now have two 80qt Engel Deep Blue Performance coolers. We keep them outside once in camp and they double as dinette benches. They easily keep sub 40 degree temps during our 5 to 7 day trips and have kept same temps during a rare two week trip.

Our next rig (Van conversion 2.0) will most likely have a Pelican cooler which has the advantage of a standard garden hose threaded drain-outlet.

Keeping our rig simple for us, also included the idea of no appliances that _need_ electric/AC or DC or parking in the sun for solar. We can stay out as long as our leave allows up some forestry road under the cool shade of an evergreen.

As others have suggested... one way to look at a camping setup is a hard sided cozy tent. That is basically how we went about setting up our rig(s) (sold Parkliner #35 included).

YMMV...but for us? We wouldn't have it any other way if away from our big rig we full time in (full hookups and all the creature comforts).

Thom

: ) And for some "Cool" comedy relief I leave you with this...
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