Is newer better? - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-22-2013, 09:19 PM   #29
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Oriented Strand Board. The "oriented" aspect makes reference to an attempt to arrange the long fibers of wood for the optimum resistance to load or impact. I do not know if OSB can match the impact resistance and load carrying capacity of plywood, which altho certainly an "engineered" product, takes the long grain (fiber) strength of wood and avoids the cross-grain (inter-fiber) weakness of wood by arranging the grain of successive plys or laminations at a right angle to the previous. The size of frame bays in a trailer frame might influence the degree to which it deflects under load but no doubt it's strong enuf to do the job or Scamp wouldn't be using it. The expression "resin-soaked" presumably refers to a Scamp-applied epoxy or polyester resin which, without the addition of a reinforcing fabric (fiberglass), can't improve the strength but certainly can improve impermeability to moisture. In the broadest possible sense, I'd say that marine ply is a stronger material but perhaps not cost-effective for Scamp's bottom line. Roundabout way to say that the low-price spread is what you're going to get with "new and improved" and it's more than likely adequate to the job.

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Old 01-22-2013, 09:23 PM   #30
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I've been laffing reading this entire thread. Shame on Scamp to "assume" ANY trailer NEEDS to have a floor replaced. My 25 year old Scamp has a perfect floor.

IT'S ALL about maintenace. Just ask the sticky folks. I've seen 5 year old all molded trailers that are trashed and 30 year old all molded trailers that are perfect. Don't ASSUME anything based on age.

All the appliances in my oldy trailer work just as they came from the factory. You wouldn't ignore a leaky roof or plumbing problems in your sticks n bricks home. And since I consider my TT the third biggest asset I own, I take care of it too.

I'll say it again... IT'S ALL ABOUT MAINTENANCE, NOT AGE.
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Old 01-22-2013, 09:27 PM   #31
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Sooner is good! I wish I had quicker wits and a shorter wind.

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Old 01-22-2013, 10:33 PM   #32
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Like everything in life its all in how it was taken care of. Im guessing alot of travel trailers are not well taken care of and that's why they start to rot away.

I want to take care of my ParkLiner, from the begining, so regularly inspecting the underside of the caravan is going to happen and my flooring is marine plywood with spar varnish over it,well maybe I will add a fresh coat... check for any rust and treat it before it advances.... keep doing that and it should last. Park it out back and ignore it for 10 years (well ok if it was a stick built trailer) then expect it to fall apart.

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Old 01-22-2013, 10:56 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post
... IT'S ALL ABOUT MAINTENANCE, NOT AGE.
Sounds like sound lifestyle advice also : ) At a healthy and happy 55 years young... I made that connection cuz my _job_ is Health & Safety Advocate at the local Costco for a crew of 160 peeps. Fun stuff every day, since i sort of created the position and have been living it with the crew for the past 20 years.

Rambling as i pass tangently through
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Old 01-22-2013, 11:06 PM   #34
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Like everything in life its all in how it was taken care of. . .check for any rust and treat it before it advances...
When Cari & I got our A-Liner home from the dealership back in 2009 (since sold) the first thing i did _that weekend_ was lightly sand and apply two coats of a product called Por-15. We sold the trailer in 2011 and the buyers crawled under the trailer and stated that the frame looked brand new...and it truly did! No matter what trailer i bring home, unless the frame is aluminum...will get a couple coats of Por-15.

Cheers,
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Old 01-23-2013, 12:06 PM   #35
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Thanks for all the info and opinions! Couple of additional questions though.... The older ones have marine plywood and the newer ones have "resin soaked OSB"....what exactly is OSB? Isn't it just chip board? Is it better than marine grade plywood? The guy at Scamp indicated that the newer floors were better....I would think that plywood would be better than chipboard for a floor...what does the resin do? I think we will go with a newer one....and I think we have found it...just need to get to it to take look.
Resin painted on OSB waterproofs the surface of the floor, whereas marine-grade plywood is itself put together with 100% waterproof adhesives. Also, here quoting from this link:
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What is Marine-grade plywood?
Marine-grade plywood is a specially designed panel made entirely of Douglas-fir or Western Larch. The grade of all plies of veneer is B or better, which means it may have knots, but no knotholes. The panels are sanded on both faces, and are also available with Medium Density Overlay (MDO) or High Density Overlay (HDO) faces. The maximum core-gap size permitted is 1/8 inch. Its exposure durability rating is EXTERIOR and the glue used is a fully waterproof structural adhesive. It is considered a “premium” panel grade for use in situations where these characteristics are required, i.e., for boat hulls and other marine applications where bending is involved.
Below are some images illustrating some of the differences between OSB and plywood.

Francesca
Attached Thumbnails
PanelsPlywoodOSB.jpg   FH02FEB_BOAPLY_01.JPG  

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Old 01-23-2013, 12:38 PM   #36
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And it depends on what kind of plywood that is. Home Depot exterior ply is not the same as high quality exterior plywood from a real lumberyard. They use different kinds of glue... and marine plywood is even betterwhich is why it is very costly. Im not a fan of the presswood.

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Old 01-23-2013, 12:46 PM   #37
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Francesca, can we safely assume that the bottom photo of OSB after soaking was not a resin protected OSB that Scamp uses but OSB right off the shelf?
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Old 01-23-2013, 01:02 PM   #38
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Francesca, can we safely assume that the bottom photo of OSB after soaking was not a resin protected OSB that Scamp uses but OSB right off the shelf?
Well, sure...but unless the mfr. is coating the whole sheet including the edges with the resin, I think the result would be the same.

And maybe Scamp is fully coating it! Atmospheric moisture in our non-breathing trailers can do nearly as much damage as "intrusive" moisture, after all...

Francesca
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Old 01-23-2013, 01:12 PM   #39
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I am guessing that it sort of mirrors any sort of "fixer upper" project when you buy something, not necessarily older, but not well cared for in that you can end up not liking it so much if it keeps costing you money and time. A nice clean and well-kept up anything, even if not newer, is a real treasure to find but takes time. I would spend the most that I could but still hold some part of my budget back for "surprises" should they arise. I can tell you from past experience that you want something "clean" and beware of odors because a lot of them can't be eliminated and I don't care what anyone says, you can cover them and they creep back out!
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Old 01-23-2013, 02:04 PM   #40
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OSB and Plywood each have their own benefits - I've looked at it in the home construction and marine industries and this is what I've found.

OSB is cheaper and its properties are more predictable due to a lack of voids (if you take apart a sheet of standard plywood, you will find that the good veneers are on the surface, and the interior ones have knots and patches). Looking at sheets of the same nominal thickness, the OSB is usually a little thinner than plywood as the voids in plywood require it to be made slightly thicker to meet the same spec. On paper, OSB is pretty darn good.

The whole story changes somewhat in the presence of water. First, the wood in both plywood and OSB will absorb water and swell (interestingly, plywood will actually wet out faster than OSB because the long sheets of veneer will transport water throughout whereas in OSB, the water flow is hindered by the resin between the wood wafers). The big difference is that plywood will shrink back pretty much to its original size as it dries, whereas OSB puffs up more, and stays puffed when it dries. Even worse is MDF - it will swell up and stay several times its size when soaked.

The key to using OSB and plywood for that matter is to treat the edges of all panels, and to treat edges after each cut - to prevent the fastest way that water is absorbed (through the end grain). Of course treating the face of the panel is also very important. If a trailer manufacturer treats both faces and all edges of a panel (either plywood or OSB ) then it should last a very long time.

In practice, I tend to prefer plywood over OSB for pretty much everything if the budget allows. IT is much nicer to work with too. Even better and many times more expensive is marine grade ply with a BS 1088 rating (this is a British Standard, but used internationally in the marine industry). That way you know it is a quality wood (usually mahogany - and usually the type is specified) and a true waterproof resin. But even then, treat the edges!
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Old 01-23-2013, 03:16 PM   #41
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Even better and many times more expensive is marine grade ply with a BS 1088 rating (this is a British Standard, but used internationally in the marine industry). That way you know it is a quality wood (usually mahogany - and usually the type is specified) and a true waterproof resin. But even then, treat the edges!
Marine grade plywood ( vs. OS is what we were talking about, or so I thought ...that's why I posted the description earlier.

It's my understanding that this is what makes up the floor of my '78 Trillium, but since it's furthermore completely covered with the same fiberglass surface as the rest of the trailer I can't get to any markings and tell for sure.

Francesca
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Old 01-31-2013, 09:42 AM   #42
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Lots of good info here. Another suggestion, be careful of what I’ll refer to as the “Pounce Principle.”

A while back, I was on a tear to get a used Scamp and did. But because the previously owned units in decent condition were rare, when one in my general vicinity came up, I jumped on it. Not exactly the layout I wanted, but the price was good and in excellent shape. I was happy.

I had spent enough time on this forum to realize the model I had my heart set on, was the same configuration that most other prospective used unit buyers were looking for, too. In other words, the demand far outstripped the supply. So I settled for a terrific buy, but with dimensions I never came to accept.

It sounds like you are going to eventually get your trailer and I commend you on doing the homework. At the same time, I caution you against pouncing on a model or vintage of Scamp that might be dictated more by your perception of a good deal than by your dreams. Good luck.
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