Knowing the earth - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-02-2015, 11:40 AM   #15
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Norm, no wonder you are so attracted to "The Rock". Newfoundland has one of the richest mixes of geology, including the exposed mantel in the Gros Morne N.P. It is that, and how it was all worked over by the glaciers. So much to see.
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Old 06-02-2015, 12:51 PM   #16
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Paul,

You are correct. Gros Morne could keep a person busy for years. On the Burin, down by Fortune there are some old, rather unique fossils, a place few visit.

Wilderness and Ecological Reserves| Environment and Conservation

We are so tiny compared to it all, yet we can be aware of it all.

I just read that 420 billion particles pass through every square inch of the earth every second. It just shows that a lot is going on all the time, a lot of it passing right through us and we are unaware....

Reading is about becoming more conscious about everything.

This Sunday I had a conscious moment... I sat in church this Sunday for a niece's Confirmation, part of the service was a group confession.

It reminded me of my youth and the post confession punishment of lengthy prayers. I wondered if it might have been better to confess the good we did and be praised for good than punished for bad, wondering if living in joy might be better than living in fear.

The number for the day.... 430 billion neutrinos pass through every square inch of our bodies every second...

Paul, speaking of glaciers in NL reminds me of the hanging valleys in the Long Range Mountains, shortly after the getting off the boat in Port aux Basque.
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Old 06-02-2015, 08:37 PM   #17
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Norm, you to to check out Airstream Forums - Powered by vBulletin and go to the Boondocking section and read some of Ray Ecklund's stuff. He seems to be a real "rockhound". He is a interesting read.
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Old 06-03-2015, 05:32 PM   #18
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East Coast Geology, etc

Hi Norm and All,

The internal geology events in Hawaii and other places have gotten much attention lately, but I'm always impressed by the local and regional "close to the surface" geology. Sometimes, even when I'm digging a fencepost, I hit a layer that I have to try to figure out "how it got there"!? Once in while all that built-up memory of old National Geographic articles helps me figure it out.

(Oh-- I have almost all Nat. Geo's from 1964 to present that I probably should sell, donate, or give away)

There's been a few coastal lighthouses (Cape Hatteras NC, Hunting Island, SC, & others) that have had to be moved inland, and the 1900 era tower foundations at the Marconi site on Cape Cod have mostly fell off the escarpment to the beach or in the water. Cape Cod, the Outer Banks, much of the Eastern Shore of VA, and probably much of the East Coast in general continues to slowly move farther west.

At some places in Eastern North Carolina, there are shoreline layers exposed that were once the insides of outer coastline and inner coastal islands. And, mostly in inner waters, some islands continue to wash away, where at others sand and land gets added.

Recent hurricanes and storms have opened and closed inlets along the Outer Banks, especially in the southern portion. The bridge at Oregon Inlet (NC Rt 12) has been closed off and on, and is in serious danger because the inlet continues to move south. At the north end, about 1/2 mile of bridge is now over land instead of water, and at the south end, all sorts of repairs continue to be made so that the bridge approach doesn't fail.

Thanks to glaciers maybe 10,000 or more years ago, we have a good sized gravel deposit part way down our hillside here in southern New England. It's great for fill, for our septic tank & leachfield, and it's the only flat area on our property, so it really benefits having a friend over that has an RV. So there's the FGRV to Geology connection-ha!

The rest of the property is rock. And that's interesting too. Lots of cool bedrock granite sticking out of the ground. But, Man, it's tough to have a lawn here. For lawnmowers, I'm on RockChopper3. RockChoppers 1 and 2 really went thru the (geologic) mill. They are both retired. I should have a museum of mower blades and the shapes they can be bent into.

I can't wait to go out to Southern California in a year or 2 when we get some time off. My son & family bought an almost 100 year old cabin in the National Forest and it's less than 1000 feet from the San Andreas fault!. That's gotta be an interesting geological place.

This past winter, due to a family death, we had to turn around just before we went into Big Bend Nat. Park. We could see the mountains on approach. Hope to re-do and take a look at the geological makeup of that area sometime in the future (with the EggCamper).

And, Norm and Paul, Now you've got me interested in Newfoundland too........What to do?

Geology (even when it sticks up in your lawn) sure is interesting!

Mark
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Old 06-03-2015, 07:14 PM   #19
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Speaking of mowing rocks - many years ago (late '70s) my boss who moved to MA from CA told me how many rocks he used to have in his lawn, and he had to keep raking and removing them. We discussed the possible causes of rocks and grass growing side by side in California, both aware that a lot of stranger things happen in California. I suggested that the micro earthquakes, that are frequent, cause the small rocks to move up through the mixture, a little bit at a time. Every once in a while I wonder if there is a better explanation. Thanks for reminding me.

From Massachusetts you can travel a long way "down east" and beyond. The ferry is expensive, but it is worth it. Unless you drive across Labrador - another world to discover there.
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Old 06-03-2015, 07:57 PM   #20
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They're digging up our streets to install new gas lines giving me a peek into the soil, mostly rocks, below our grass. Our home is 17 feet above sea level making it the highest spot in our neighborhood. We and our two abutting neighbors are the only ones who never have had water in our cellar, valuable during tropical storm Sandy.

Interesting we're on a mixture of gravel, sand and stones, all ocean rounded stones, definitely good for drainage. None of the stones work their way to the surface to bother our electric lawnmower. Of course most people I know own a lawnmower, though it doesn't seem to be the case in Newfoundland though that's probably changing as well.

Paul, We've traveled about as far 'down east' as one can travel by car, out to Newfoundland's Cape Spear Lighthouse. I hope the house sells relatively quickly..I'd like to steal away before we head south. Tonight the weatherman's predicted Boston will break the low temperature record set in 1881 for June 3rd, still chilly here.

One of the first geological/historical sites in Newfoundland was a soapstone cliff where Native Americans carved soapstone bowls out of the cliff face. Partially completed bowls can still be seen in the face.

I also get a lot of pleasure out of end of the road trips, little villages of 50-200 people where everyone knows everyone, little houses clustered around a long harbor, maybe one little store, a post office, home gardens and many cords of firewood stacked for the winter.
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:28 AM   #21
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To be accurate, most of our problems with rocks in the lawn are due to subsidence. When we moved in 25 years ago, we had a front lawn made of stone. So, I removed some stone and filled over the rest. No matter how good a compact job, over the years, there is almost always subsidence in these cases. Now, it's time to add a few inches of soil on top of the lawn, landscape & reseed, and the mower will thank me.

Norm, the ocean rounded stones in your subsoil brings a possible theory that maybe your area of seacoast is one where there has been a significant gradual adding of land for many years. And, could storm after storm over the years have piled up the "added" land to the 17' elevation? Could be possible. Of course, maybe a geologist would bring forward a better theory than mine.
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:08 AM   #22
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Down East

There's another area called "Down East" that you may or may not have heard of. It's in Eastern North Carolina. Loosely, some upstate and out of state folks refer to it as most any of the area SE and East of Raleigh. But that's really a misnomer. The term "Down East" really only applies to the most East part of Carteret County--that portion East of Beaufort, NC. It's about 10 fishing villages, none of which are incorporated, each having a similar description like the ones Norm described in Newfoundland, but maybe more like 100-500 folks each.

Though the area was settled in the early 1700's, less than 100 years ago there were still no roads, or hardly any roads into this area. So, all trade was accomplished by boat. Probably because of their remoteness, these towns had and continue to have to some extent, as very different dialect. Sometimes it's referred to as a variation of Elizabethan English, but after hearing it many times, I still don't get that connection. It's just different. The Old English influences and maybe Native American influence may have something to do with how the language developed, but the biggest reason was probably the fact that the area developed independently of the inland areas. The area is south enough for a very long growing season (9-10 months) and fishing all year round, so folks could be, and some continue to be, completely self sufficient with little need for outside influence or even outside trade. But, the dialect is slowly disappearing.

I'm sure that the term "Down East" developed separately in Eastern NC from the same term used in Maine and the Maritimes. One of my friends at Cedar Island noted to me casually that he had heard that there was another "Down East" up in Maine somewhere.

Now, there's a decent highway all the way through Down East, NC. It's a causeway much of the way, and while technically, mostly, not a true "island" , this area is completely surrounded by wide rivers, ocean and marsh that previously led to the area being very effectively cut off from the mainland.

It's been an interesting and historical area for me to poke around in. I'm surprised more folks don't visit. It's a great fishing area with clean waters and many free boat ramps with parking. There are several campgrounds, none of which ever seem to be very busy. One the whole, the area is bit like going back in history while still having all of today's advantages. Probably not that much different than many of those small, remote fishing villages in Down East Maine, the Maritimes and Newfoundland.
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Old 06-04-2015, 01:25 PM   #23
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End of the Roads????

In the last two years we've gone to two areas, Burgeo and Harbour Breton, each over 100 miles off NL's trans Canada highway on the east coast. They received their first dirt roads in the 1970s and their first paved roads in the 1990s . Until then they were only serviced by boats. Kind of funny but Newfoundland is an island is really still serviced by boat though the two big ferries were stuck in the ice this winter between NS and NL.

Until they opened the Trans Labrador Highway in 2002 the eastern portion of Labrador could be virtually without even ship service for 8 months. A gas station owner told me they used to store 8 months of gasoline.
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Old 06-04-2015, 01:33 PM   #24
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Piles of Rock

Quote:
Originally Posted by coastsignal View Post
To be accurate, most of our problems with rocks in the lawn are due to subsidence. When we moved in 25 years ago, we had a front lawn made of stone. So, I removed some stone and filled over the rest. No matter how good a compact job, over the years, there is almost always subsidence in these cases. Now, it's time to add a few inches of soil on top of the lawn, landscape & reseed, and the mower will thank me.

Norm, the ocean rounded stones in your subsoil brings a possible theory that maybe your area of seacoast is one where there has been a significant gradual adding of land for many years. And, could storm after storm over the years have piled up the "added" land to the 17' elevation? Could be possible. Of course, maybe a geologist would bring forward a better theory than mine.
We've lived in Hampton Beach for 30 years and storms, particularly winter storms can be ferocious. The coast road is protected by a massive concrete wall for miles. I've seen head size boulders thrown over the wall and two lanes of road by the action of the water.

Some days you'll look over the edge of the wall and all you see is a boulder and stones beach, come back the next day and there's just deep sand. The ocean can be a magnificent transport system.

The center of the beach is all sand, no concrete wall there. In the winter the ocean can transport that sand to the main beach road, so much so that it needs to be sand plowed.

I loved the power of the winter storms.

I suspect our yard and all this area has been above and below sea level many times, it's only 10,000 years since the last ice age and the time of the real moving of materials.
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