Lil Snoozy Fiberglass Shell Construction - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 09-24-2014, 12:57 PM   #15
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If you're looking for perfect...... you will spend all your time looking and none traveling.

I love my trailer, I work to make it perfect, however like a good marriage you should ignore the negative, and enjoy the positive.

My trailer is 23 years old and my marriage 50.....

Every minute on the road is a delight.
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Old 09-24-2014, 01:09 PM   #16
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the screws that are in the FG are only for attaching blinds etc. They originally came almost through the hull causing the stress cracks. the later models use very short screws. The cabinets are attached with stainless bolts through the belt-line where the two hulls are put together. They are concealed under the belt line trim .The only exception is one SS bolt through the upper hull in the right side. It helps give the upper cabinet extra support.
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Old 09-24-2014, 04:28 PM   #17
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Norm: You are absolutely correct! Glad your camper fits you and Ginny!

Ken: Thanks for the links. Lots of good information to look over & ponder.

Charlie: Yes, I knew about that, but thanks anyway.
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Old 09-29-2014, 02:55 PM   #18
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I am actually pretty surprised that the shell is so thin. I had imagined it to be 3/4" or 1" thick or so. I never guessed it would be as thin as 3/8". That isn't a commentary about their construction so much as a lack of knowledge on my part.

I'm sorta trying to wrap my mind around how you could successfully screw anything into that and expect it to hold, particularly as fiberglass doesn't hold screws very well in the first place. I would think it might be better to use bonding adhesive.
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Old 09-29-2014, 03:42 PM   #19
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Yes Paul, the thickness surprised me too when I first saw it, but to my surprise very strong indeed. Like I mentioned, I took a couple of pretty hard whacks at a sample piece about 2' x 2' and couldn't begin to bust through it or crack it in half. Maybe I could have with a sledge hammer, but what other camper could claim it could withstand a blow like that? The best I could do was slightly dent the surface and crack the gel coat where the hammer made contact, and the cracks spread no bigger than the head of the hammer. It's pretty ridged stuff. Like I said I'm not endorsing the camper, just sharing my personal experience & test while visiting the plant. The composite structure is pretty darn solid IMO. It tickled my wifey that I couldn't bust it.
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Old 09-30-2014, 08:46 AM   #20
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I have been thinking of buying an empty-shell Snoozy with just the bathroom installed, and finishing out the rest of the interior myself. So, the shell being so thin is making me think things through a bit more.

My experience with screws and rivets on my prior camper leaves me unwilling to put a lot of penetrations through the Snoozy, but I have to think how else I can attach things. The attachment method I had in mind won't work on so thin a material (not because of strength, but because of dimension). Bolting through the belly-band is great for things that are mounted low, but not so great for over-head cabinets.

Where there is a will, there is a way. Sounds like a visit to Snoozy-land is in my future, to look it over first-hand.
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Old 09-30-2014, 09:24 AM   #21
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Paul, I feel the same way about not using bolts or screws into or through the fiberglass. I use adhesive whenever possible, or attach items to existing structures (air conditioner frame). When I installed our larger overhead cabinets, I used adhesive for the cabinet dividers, and used the "pinch rail" screws on the windows to support them as well. We've gone 7,000 miles now without any signs of separation or leaking from the windows.
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Old 09-30-2014, 10:14 AM   #22
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Ummm... LOVE the clock. Very Daliesque.
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Old 09-30-2014, 12:00 PM   #23
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Paul, I'm considering the same thing with the Snoozy, basic shell with shower & walls installed and lower cabinet, sofa, and bed framing. I plan to do the rest myself. Now, I have worked with fiberglass before so I'm considering glassing in blocks strategically placed on the walls for mounting (screwing) upper structures to. That way I'm actually running my screws & L clamps into the blocks not the outer wall shell. I've seen others here working on similar mounting techniques for hanging cabinets, etc. Robert Johans: The Egg Plant ,has posted some build threads here where he glassed in blocks to the upper wall shells to mount cabinets in a Boler project. I can't see why the same techniques wouldn't work with the Snoozy shell. Just may have to sand off the inside gel coat to get at the raw glass so the new stuff will adhere well. Robert also has some great ideas about installing reflectix & hulliner to the interior walls for better insulation, something else I'm considering for the bed area. Good info if you plan on doing some customizing.
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Old 09-30-2014, 12:31 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg489 View Post
Paul,
Now, I have worked with fiberglass before so I'm considering glassing in blocks strategically placed on the walls for mounting (screwing) upper structures to. That way I'm actually running my screws & L clamps into the blocks not the outer wall shell.
Several fiberglass manufactures use that technic to install cabinets.... Escape being one of them.
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Old 09-30-2014, 12:48 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by greg489 View Post
I'm considering glassing in blocks strategically placed on the walls for mounting (screwing) upper structures to. That way I'm actually running my screws & L clamps into the blocks not the outer wall shell.
I am thinking along similar lines, but possibly using 3M bonding adhesive to adhere upper and lower cleats to the ceiling and wall, and then screwing into them. If those cleats are continuous, they should provide a lot of strength. My design would have floor-to-ceiling support at one end, and an end-wall attachment point at the other. I may design it for floor-to-ceiling support at both ends, just for grins and giggles.
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Old 09-30-2014, 01:08 PM   #26
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Trillium also bonded wood to the inside of the fibreglass, under the ensolite. This is how the front upper shelves of 4500's are mounted on the door side, also the bunk bar on the kitchen side is mounted this way. Everything else is either fibreglass, bonded to the shell, or it is mounted to the plywood frame on the inside of the trailer that the windows screw into from the outside.

For something as potentially as heavy as a cabinets, I would not just glue it to the shell, but use fibreglass over the wood as well. That would keep it on the wall.
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Old 09-30-2014, 01:31 PM   #27
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I do believe Robert bonded (glued) his blocks too before glassing over just for positioning and extra strength (correct me if I'm wrong Robert, if you are reading this). I may have to contact him for more helpful tips when the time comes to install the blocks. He's done some sweet renovations on popular egg models.

Paul: Wouldn't mind you elaborating a little more on your floor to ceiling idea. Sounds interesting, but I'm having a hard time visualizing.
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Old 09-30-2014, 10:59 PM   #28
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5/8"-3/4" on the bottom hull section and 3/8"-1/2" on the top doesn't sound so thin to me, in terms of strength. This is considerably thicker than a Scamp or Casita shell, after all. The fact that the Snoozy needs no inner supports to provide rigidity is a good indicator of the shell's strength.

Now, if someone rear-ends a Snoozy at decent speed I have no doubt that the shell will crack and break in places, but what structure won't? We don't want to tow steel-reinforced-concrete trailers, so no trailer we buy will be indestructible in the face of serious abuse.

As for the issue of attaching things, I can't see any good reason to use screws into the hull when one can attach wood with adhesive and then screw into that wood. My Hauley was built with a 2"x8" (IIRC on the width) running the length of each side, so I could screw some attachment points to it and tie stuff down with nylon straps. These boards are on the walls nice and solid, and I don't think I could ever rip them off without serious cutting tools. If I ever decide to finish the interior for camping, the boards would make great attachments for all the cabinetry. I'm sure more wood can be added wherever it's needed, too.
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