Looking for Info on Boat Shaped Fiberglass Trailer - Fiberglass RV



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Old 05-29-2019, 04:47 PM   #1
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Name: Rick
Trailer: Bigfoot
Washington
Posts: 3
Looking for Info on Boat Shaped Fiberglass Trailer

Just picked up this unique Boat Shaped Fiberglass Trailer. Most likely a utility Trailer? Canít find any manf. info. Anybody know anything abt. it?
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Old 05-30-2019, 03:15 PM   #2
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Name: G
Trailer: Damon
Alberta
Posts: 36
boat shaped trailer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Pimley View Post
Just picked up this unique Boat Shaped Fiberglass Trailer. Most likely a utility Trailer? Canít find any manf. info. Anybody know anything abt. it?
What you appear to have is the bottom part of a flip open camper. The top half is identical except for the fenders. The unit pivots at the stern and the pair of existing hole take fasteners to hold it open, There should be some hoops to support the tentage.. I've only ever seen one, the remains were on the Camp Petawawa dump circa 1964?? It probably came home from Germany with a repat soldier!!
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Old 05-31-2019, 12:18 AM   #3
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Name: Alan
Trailer: 1983 Casita & 1972 home-built
Oregon
Posts: 19
Foam sandwich camper construction

You can build your own uniquely curvy top half for this thing with polyisocyanurate rigid foam and fiberglass mat or cloth. Build a temporary armature/boat skeleton structure on top of this base to support the foam from the inside. Keep perfect matching mold forms from bonding by using two layers of aluminum foil to separate the two sides. Window, door, and vent openings, curved or flat, can be framed by multiple layers of plywood laminated together so you have a very solid screw base to attach things to. Attach the window frames to the armature. Lay on sheets of foam, using 2" or thicker to radius tight corners and curves, like building a barrel with thick foam staves. Glue the foam pieces together with contact cement and stainless steel screws, and shape the outside surfaces with surfoam tools and sandpaper.



When you have the shape you want, laminate the outside with fiberglass. I used minimum two layers of 1.5 oz mat and did not try to sand it smooth. White gelcoat sprayed at a slight stipple finished the outside surfaces.



After the outside is laminated, disassemble the armature and pull it out. Shape the inside surfaces as you like, always leaving at least an inch of foam, (2" or more is better insulation and stronger). Embed plywood strips for screwing interior features into as needed. Fiberglass the inside. I turned my camper upside down to do the inside roof.


Now you have a curved camper shell that is insulated and self-supporting ready for interior furnishings. I used redwood bender board radiused in inside, standard trailer awning windows and 14x14 vents, and a wood/foam sandwich door. I built my foam sandwich stand up pickup camper in 1972, lived in it for more than 7 years, and still use it today for camping and job shack.
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Old 05-31-2019, 08:23 AM   #4
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Name: Rick
Trailer: Bigfoot
Washington
Posts: 3
Thanks workhorsed

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Originally Posted by workhorsed View Post
What you appear to have is the bottom part of a flip open camper. The top half is identical except for the fenders. The unit pivots at the stern and the pair of existing hole take fasteners to hold it open, There should be some hoops to support the tentage.. I've only ever seen one, the remains were on the Camp Petawawa dump circa 1964?? It probably came home from Germany with a repat soldier!!
When I first saw this trailer, I assumed it was missing the top half? After inspecting it further, I donít find any evidence of Hinges or other attachments near the top that would support a Top Half. It does have multiple hooks along the outside edge at bottom, attached to the plywood floor and frame. It looks like it was designed to allow a Tarp to be tied down?
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Old 05-31-2019, 08:39 AM   #5
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Name: Rick
Trailer: Bigfoot
Washington
Posts: 3
Thanks Alan for thoughtful info!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ARVZ View Post
You can build your own uniquely curvy top half for this thing with polyisocyanurate rigid foam and fiberglass mat or cloth. Build a temporary armature/boat skeleton structure on top of this base to support the foam from the inside. Keep perfect matching mold forms from bonding by using two layers of aluminum foil to separate the two sides. Window, door, and vent openings, curved or flat, can be framed by multiple layers of plywood laminated together so you have a very solid screw base to attach things to. Attach the window frames to the armature. Lay on sheets of foam, using 2" or thicker to radius tight corners and curves, like building a barrel with thick foam staves. Glue the foam pieces together with contact cement and stainless steel screws, and shape the outside surfaces with surfoam tools and sandpaper.



When you have the shape you want, laminate the outside with fiberglass. I used minimum two layers of 1.5 oz mat and did not try to sand it smooth. White gelcoat sprayed at a slight stipple finished the outside surfaces.



After the outside is laminated, disassemble the armature and pull it out. Shape the inside surfaces as you like, always leaving at least an inch of foam, (2" or more is better insulation and stronger). Embed plywood strips for screwing interior features into as needed. Fiberglass the inside. I turned my camper upside down to do the inside roof.


Now you have a curved camper shell that is insulated and self-supporting ready for interior furnishings. I used redwood bender board radiused in inside, standard trailer awning windows and 14x14 vents, and a wood/foam sandwich door. I built my foam sandwich stand up pickup camper in 1972, lived in it for more than 7 years, and still use it today for camping and job shack.
Wow Alan! Thanks for the Detailed response! Iím blown away by the effort you put into explaining the process. Canít thank you enough. Iíve always thought it would be fun to fabricate something with Fiberglass, however, I have too many other commitments in my life to take on another project at this time. I will probably end up selling this trailer? It could be a cool and unique Trailer behind a Classic Car or Trike or something with a Boat theme? Or maybe a display in front of an Antique Shop specializing in Boating or Fishing industry? If I knew who made it, or had other pictures, I could share that with a potential buyer and know where to advertise.
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