Noob Asks: What's the Downside to This? - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-05-2011, 10:41 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by RSchleder View Post
Buying any 16' and loading it up for travel would, in my opinion, push the 2,000 lb limit.


Just an example, My 17ft Casita weighted in at 2800 pounds empty! EMPTY! Not a drop of water, not a ounce of grey/black water. I even pulled the cushions out before taking it to be weighted.
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Old 07-05-2011, 10:46 AM   #30
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Name: Norm and Ginny
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Originally Posted by CindyL View Post
Oh, another downside for some is the height of some of the trailers. If you are tall and want to stand up in your trailer, be aware that some are not tall enough to do so. I cannot tell you which ones for sure other than older Scamps, but if this is an issue for you, keep this in mind. We have a UHaul that is tall enough for my hubby who is 6'1". He has issues where the air conditioner is and with our curved roofline is (So do I. It usually takes me one head bump per trip to remember to duck ). I wondered when I whacked my head last week if something with a flatter roofline would be better.

Anyway, something to keep in mind.

CindyL
CindyL,

I'm 6'1" as well and have banged my head on the vent a couple of times, no AC. What we do is hang a piece of red yarn on the danger points and it pretty much eliminates the hits.

Norm
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Old 07-05-2011, 10:55 AM   #31
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When I had my Scamp 13 Dlx, I gutted it and redid the entire interior without much regard for weight. It had the front bathroom with shower, solid oak cabinets all around (full perimeter uppers as well as full kitchen, wardrobe and pantry), solid oak hardwood floor, refrigerator, microwave, air conditioner, water heater and propane system. Loaded for a trip with food, clothes and supplies, it weighed in at almost exactly 1600# according to the local truck scale. A 13' camper can be much, much lighter than mine was.

Mine was a 1987, I think. I believe the older ones are lighter than the newer ones.

I currently own a Little Guy teardrop that weighs about 700 lbs loaded for camping. Last fall, we headed to Ohio for a weekend, towing with a 2001 Chevy Prizm (like Toyota Corolla, 1500 lbs tow capacity). It was misting, and we were going down a moderate downgrade. The stoplight at the bottom of the hill turned red, so I applied the brakes. We slid a LONG ways before finally stopping about halfway into the intersection. God was good to us - nobody was in front of us, and traffic on the cross-street waited for us to get stopped. This was towing no more than 700 pounds, mind you. It was an eye-opener for us.

Our next trip with the Little Guy was to the factory in SugarCreek, OH, to have the axle traded out for one with brakes. Light cars can tow (keep the tongue weight low!), but they can't stop. I will never tow a camper without brakes again. We just returned from a camping trip over the rainy 4th of July weekend, and with the brakes, stops were safe and secure.
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Old 07-05-2011, 12:39 PM   #32
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Many of your smaller V6 SUVs (Toyota RAV4, Ford Escape, Hyndai Santa Fe, etc) are good for 3500 pounds, are comfortable, and are fun to drive. The Toyota Venza, though expensive, makes a very nice tug.

Make sure to get the V6, though.


Yeah, our bed is small. And our holding tanks are only good for three days if we are not careful.
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Old 07-05-2011, 01:28 PM   #33
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Lizbeth is right. The bed in my 13' is small for 2 adults. I made an extension that attaches to the END of the dinette table so 2 can sleep lengthwise rather than crossways as the dinette bed is designed. It's is king sized at the head and slightly smaller at the feet. Not perfect but very comfortable.
Barrie
Yeah, this business of small beds would bug me. Not that we are so big or anything, but gee whiz, I want some small sense of comfort.

Of course, I am still yet to set foot in one, so this is all guessing on my part. Looking at the diagrams and pix, 16-foot seems right.
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Old 07-05-2011, 02:42 PM   #34
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Trailer: Escape 5.0 TA, 2014
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Originally Posted by redwoodguy View Post
Of course, I am still yet to set foot in one, so this is all guessing on my part. Looking at the diagrams and pix, 16-foot seems right.
Just remember, the three feet you gain in a 16 footer over a 13 footer, is NOT put into the bed... at least in the Scamps.
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Old 07-05-2011, 03:04 PM   #35
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Trailer: Lance 1985~'Casita de Campo' ~23' 4"~Dinette Slide Previously: Scamp 16 ft Side Dinette, Front Bath
New Mexico
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For a small size/light weight with a larger bed a non-moldered fiberglass TT could be more easy to find, perhaps:

Fun Finder X Travel Trailer | 2011 X-139 | Cruiser RV | Lightweight Travel Trailers | Lightweight RVs | Lightweight Toy Haulers | Lightweight Campers
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Old 07-05-2011, 04:19 PM   #36
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Small Beds

When we bought our first trailer 'just' for a 2 month trip to Labrador we thought the bed would be the major issue. It turned out to be a non-issue. We liked the trailer so much we took it for 8 more months on a loop of the USA. Since than we've traveled for 4 years averaging 7 months a year in that size bed. There has not been one night where we did not sleep comfortably due to the bed.

I think part of it relates to the fact that we're more active when traveling and sleep better. As well our lives are simply more relaxed when we're away. When we're traveling I almost feel like we did when we were dating in high school. Traveling all the time is a fantasy life.

It's true that we are physically closer but we've always felt that sleeping in a king size bed is like sleeping alone..... Sure we occasionally accidently bump into each other and so... And when it's cold it's so easy to cuddle up. We love our bed and since the first two months have never wondered about.

Of course all our friends think we're crazy; most of them own large rigs. We're happy for all of them but one thing I know is we've been to more places in North America than practically every one of them. The bed is way down on the list I of things I would and have changed in a trailer.

Of course everyone is different....

Norm
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Old 07-05-2011, 05:50 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by honda03842 View Post
When we bought our first trailer 'just' for a 2 month trip to Labrador we thought the bed would be the major issue. It turned out to be a non-issue. We liked the trailer so much we took it for 8 more months on a loop of the USA. Since than we've traveled for 4 years averaging 7 months a year in that size bed. There has not been one night where we did not sleep comfortably due to the bed.

I think part of it relates to the fact that we're more active when traveling and sleep better. As well our lives are simply more relaxed when we're away. When we're traveling I almost feel like we did when we were dating in high school. Traveling all the time is a fantasy life.

It's true that we are physically closer but we've always felt that sleeping in a king size bed is like sleeping alone..... Sure we occasionally accidently bump into each other and so... And when it's cold it's so easy to cuddle up. We love our bed and since the first two months have never wondered about.

Of course all our friends think we're crazy; most of them own large rigs. We're happy for all of them but one thing I know is we've been to more places in North America than practically every one of them. The bed is way down on the list I of things I would and have changed in a trailer.

Of course everyone is different....

Norm
In our case it's not so much the width of the bed (48") in the Boler but the length (ok the width too). Hubby is 6'2" and I am 5'7". The bed is just too dang short plus the fact that hubby likes to sleep with his knees bent, it feels better on his bad back.

We love our "twin" bed conversion in the Bigfoot. I can have my Princess and the pea bed, hubby can have his longer plywood bed, we are both happy. If we feel the need to be together we have other options.
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Old 07-05-2011, 07:33 PM   #38
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Name: Des and Diane (D & D)
Trailer: Boler 1300, 1977 (#2033, "L EGGO")
Ontario
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Hi redwoodguy,

With V-6 Camrys rated to pull 2,000 lbs, first a '96 and currently an '04, in 11 years we have towed our '77 13' boler some 90,000 kilometres (56,000 miles) down and up 45-degree (so it seemed) Palo Duro canyon, over Wolf Creek pass (10,857') and everything in between from coast to coast, with nary a problem.

Trying to update and preferring a car to a wagon, van or SUV (for ease of loading our canoe, among other things), I found that ALL cars, including Camry, are now dumbed down to pull only1,000 lbs. So hang on to your '06, as I'm doing with the '04 -- we have classics.

She weighs in at 1,620 lbs. including fridge, stove, furnace and cupboards, fully loaded and ready to go. I place a narrow, loose board flat at the side of the bed, which gives us a few more inches of cosyness.

Having expanded from a two-person tent and spending most of our time outdoors, we see no need for space extra to the luxury that we have now.

Des & Diane
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Old 07-05-2011, 07:39 PM   #39
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downdsides are varied between owners like anything else I'm sure....but I'll try
height and width in some is restricted....you dont see that alot with stickies.....
new ones are pricy, esp if youre also looking at stickies and compare.....
there are virtually no dealers in North America unless you count the makers....and I think thats stupid,nvm they're reasoning behind it.......smaller ones require a porta potty usually and have no shower, normally.
without mods, alot of them wont take a rooftop AC..kinda fun.......I'm sure theres more but im not unhappy with my uhaul either so i dont know it all.
all that said, if you asked the opposite question, this list would be quite long....most people adore their fiberglass camper.
oh yeah, add tours to the list if youre a private type of person (i'm not) we gave 4 this past 4th of july weekend..two families of stickies and 2 tent clans, so the interest comes from all types.
Bruce & Mary
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Old 07-05-2011, 10:02 PM   #40
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Name: Jesse
Trailer: 1984 Scamp 13'
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My '84 Scamp 13 weighs about 1,200 pounds empty. I figure about 150 pounds more loaded. We do travel with a lot of our stuff in the car (and on the roof rack). We have a little one, so there's stuff we have to have in the car.

My car is also a Toyota, but only has a 1.8 liter 128 horsepower engine. Toyota rates it for about 1,700 pounds. I keep it slow... 60 MPH max. Loaded properly, it drives like a charm. Yes, it feels like there's a parachute behind me on the highway, and my fuel economy plummets to 23-24 MPG... But my car gets upper 30s without the trailer, and that's what I need for a daily driver. I used to have a VW Golf, which was rated for nearly 3,000 pounds, but maintenance issues led me to get rid of it.

I WISH I had a V6 Camry to tow with... But I can't afford two cars right now. Our backup tow vehicle (the wife's car) is a Honda Civic.
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Old 07-05-2011, 11:58 PM   #41
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Post We've had some interesting Dealer discussions:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Thomas View Post
there are virtually no dealers in North America unless you count the makers....and I think thats stupid,nvm they're reasoning behind it...
There have been several Molded Fiberglass Trailer Manufacturers who are members of this website. They have related 1st hand experience with Dealerships...
Link #1 Escape Trailer
Reace, The Manufacturer of Escape Trailers started out using Dealers...

Link #2 http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...ing-28364.html
... He then counsels Steve Wishek, the Manufacturer of Genesis Trailers about why he abandoned Dealer Networks and markets them direct as Scamp and Casita do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reace View Post
Hi Steve

I am assuming the price you have listed as an MSRP is the price from the dealer. Have you considered selling your product to the consumer direct from the factory? Molded fiberglass trailers are more costly to build as you well know and selling direct keeps the middle man (dealer) out of the consumer's pocket.

You are obviously building a high end product and nobody knows all the little perks about your trailer better than you. Showing your customer first hand how they are built and why they cost what they do goes a long way. My experience using dealers to market a product like this is they tend to lump it in with the rest of the stick and tin trailers and no matter how much you try to brain wash them that this is better....they don't get it.

Just my thoughts from one small manufacturer to another.

Best of luck

Reace
Steve stayed with a dealer network... and went out of business...
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Old 07-06-2011, 12:20 AM   #42
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Trailer: 1972 boler American and 1979 Trillium 4500
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If you want the bigger bed and keep the light weight, consider a Compact JR. They can be hard to find, but I'm sure with your budget you could find a wreck and get it totally restored / updated.
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