Over the weekend... - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-06-2015, 07:28 PM   #29
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Old 08-06-2015, 08:17 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
I'm tying to understand why, when the tire companies employ a R&D department to design a tire specifically for use on trailers, that anybody would decide they know better than these companies and use a light truck or passenger tire instead.
Why???... It's not that difficult to understand. ST tires are the poorest grade of tire produced other than a lawn tractor tire. Statistics show that generally speaking, trailer tires have a failure rate many times that of LT or P rated tires. When you follow data from RV shops that have not been using ST tires on trailes you see the positive trend of "fewer tire failures".
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Old 08-06-2015, 08:21 PM   #31
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you see the positive trend of "less tire issues".
Fewer.
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Old 08-06-2015, 08:30 PM   #32
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Fewer.
A good point Glenn and I like it. Ill make the correction. Thnxs!
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Old 08-06-2015, 08:40 PM   #33
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St-Tires

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Originally Posted by MC1 View Post
Why???... It's not that difficult to understand. ST tires are the poorest grade of tire produced other than a lawn tractor tire. Statistics show that generally speaking, trailer tires have a failure rate many times that of LT or P rated tires. When you follow data from RV shops that have not been using ST tires on trailes you see the positive trend of "less tire failures".
As this aren't claims heard very often, even from those that use their trailers year around, can you cite some published statistics or documentation for the highlighted claims. Without other support I suspect that there is some, as we call it here in the south, "Hooey" involved.

If these claims are supportable, the information should be turned over to the NHTSA for action, they love these problems, it keeps them from getting their budgets cut.

You may have noticed that the o.p. that started this thread still has not posted the age date information, overage is seemingly, a leading cause of all RV tire failures, both on trailers as well as motorhomes.
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Old 08-06-2015, 08:48 PM   #34
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If these claims are supportable, the information should be turned over to the NHTSA for action, they love these problems, it keeps them from getting their budgets cut.
There are some trailers that tow great and others that are not so nice. Just because they are, not so nice doesn't mean that NHTSA is going to do anything about it, even if you do send them a note.
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Old 08-06-2015, 08:48 PM   #35
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Actually, maybe he was running on lawn tractor tires? Who knows?
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Old 08-06-2015, 08:50 PM   #36
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First you were blaming the tires now you are blaming the trailers, which is it


In other words ya got nothing.....
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Old 08-06-2015, 09:59 PM   #37
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I wonder if the new, thicker tread also stresses the tire more due to centrifugal force.
not measurably
Deeper tread is less stable and squirms creating more friction and thus more heat. I used to make a point of buying tires in November so that I would have deeper tread for winter driving and better handling come summer once the tread was worn a bit.
High performance tires often come with shallower tread and race tires are often shaved.
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Old 08-06-2015, 10:11 PM   #38
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I know this has been rehashed many times but is there truly a reason we con not run good quality car or truck tires on our trailers . It seems that specific for trailer tires are not as good quality and seem to blow or disinagrate often and have lower speed ratings . I know of some people using car or truck tires with out issues. Some say they will bounce less but on a small trailer they seem to bounce a lot anyways . I think I'd rather spend more on a good longer lasting tire not trailer specific than replacing tires constantly after little use but being a manufacture of a trailer and renting out trailers of course we must go the proper and legal route .
We ran low profile car tires on our race trailer for about a dozen years, [not an endorsement]they looked nice and they gave us a better angle of approach and a lowered fender for loading and unloading the car. My driver paid little attention to speed limits on or off the track. We never had a trailer tire problem.
When we went to a seriously large enclosed trailer it got trailer tires of the appropriate load range.
Trailer size and weight are factors which are largely ignored when the hyperbole starts.

One factor which calls for trailer tires even on very light trailers is that the good ones have greater UV protection which is a big plus for trailers which spend most of their lives in storage.
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Old 08-06-2015, 11:30 PM   #39
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Who's Smarter????

Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
I'm tying to understand why, when the tire companies employ a R&D department to design a tire specifically for use on trailers, that anybody would decide they know better than these companies and use a light truck or passenger tire instead.
I'm with you on this Glen. But, in the world of RV's (as well as other worlds I am sure) there is always a cadre of folks that think that they are smarter than the designers, engineers and all of the lawyers in the business.

It's all to easy for that sub-group to call others "stupid" when they disagree. In short, when they don't like the message, they choose to attack the messenger.

As an example, when a few Chinese mfgs. make some substandard tires, they choose to attack the entire product rather than the examples.

Maybe we can rent the set from the recent debates and have them all go at it..... Unfortunately, as the majoro domo P.I.T.A. I'd probably be assigned the middle podium. LOL
P.I.T.A. = Provider of Inconvenient Trailering Advice.....
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Old 08-07-2015, 07:32 AM   #40
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I think there is another factor to throw in for consideration, and that is that the term "trailer" is a little ambiguous. Yes, a trailer is always a non-powered vehicle that is pulled behind another vehicle. But, there the similarity fades away. If I buy a trailer tire, what trailer is it designed for, and for what conditions?

The primary advantage that trailer tires bring to the table is stiffer sidewalls. The assumption is that trailers are for hauling loads, generally at reduced speeds and shorter distances, and less frequently. The stiff sidewall allows it to carry a wider range of loads, and it stabilizes the trailer against unbalanced loads.

But, to reach that design intent, the manufacturer made a whole lot of assumptions. Some of those assumptions were correct, some were not. So, whether or not the trailer tire is the best option for me, on my particular camper, loaded the way I load it, driven the way I drive, on the types of roads I drive, as frequently as I use the trailer, in the weather conditions I travel in, etc, would be a formula far too complicated for my sorry little brain.

My guess is that there are a few assumptions that we can safely make, as well. First, if your trailer EVER wags its tail, or if you feel that you need a sway control, you should be running trailer tires. If you like to go to cast-iron or dutch-oven campouts, you should be running trailer tires. If it takes you more than 10 minutes to load or unload stuff in/from the trailer when you set up/tear down, you should be running trailer tires. If you are a minimalist/travel light sort of camper, you will probably be fine running LT or P-rated tires. (I am in this last group, but I still run trailer tires).

On more comment from this peanut -- having tires rated for higher speeds is NO JUSTIFICATION for towing at higher speeds. The integrity of the tire is only one little factor in all of the dynamics involved in towing at higher speed. Physics is the big factor, and tires don't change physics - only duct tape can do that.
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Old 08-07-2015, 07:50 AM   #41
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At what temperature should I begin to worry? I have an IR thermometer that I pull out at gas stops during warm weather trips. Never seems to read over 110 degree F. In cool weather I'm usually too lazy to check much.

Also, I have asked my DW to climb out the window to get a reading at speed, but she seems reluctant. Any tips to increase her enthusiasm? ;-)

John
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Old 08-07-2015, 08:03 AM   #42
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Set the example... do it yourself one time while she is driving.... LOL
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