Palomini Fiberglass camper - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 11-17-2015, 01:55 PM   #15
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Byron. That's sort of what I was thinking. Just look at all the members here with molded FG trailers from the '70s and even '60s. You just aren't going to see that with stickies, not even those with FG panels.
I've recently had two different Casitas from the early '90s, and with some upgrades to the waste plumbing they were essentially as good as new ones.

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Old 11-17-2015, 09:51 PM   #16
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"You just aren't going to see that with stickies..."

Yet, Tin can tourists and sister on the fly enjoy their vintage stickies every day
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Old 11-17-2015, 09:56 PM   #17
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Every day maybe, but far fewer of them.
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Old 11-18-2015, 08:59 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by WaltP View Post
Every day maybe, but far fewer of them.
...especially as a percentage of the number of units originally produced. Molded fiberglass output has always been a small fraction of sticky output.

Most sticky restorations involve substantial reconstruction of the wood framework, paneling, and cabinetry. Restoring a fiberglass trailer usually does not involve reconstructing the shell or fiberglass interior cabinetry.

Obviously there are some restoration issues common to both build types, such as floor rot and mechanical systems, and the lightweight frames of molded fiberglass trailers may be more likely to need attention.

Biggest indicator of the advantages of molded fiberglass construction, though, is not the restorations (given enough time and money you can make almost anything new again), but it's the percentage of unrestored vintage units still in regular service.
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Old 11-18-2015, 09:03 AM   #19
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I have always seen Tin Can Tourists as being a restoration/preservation group
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Old 11-18-2015, 06:48 PM   #20
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I think I will keep my Casita. I have been well pleased so far. Thanks for everyone's input.
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Old 11-18-2015, 07:13 PM   #21
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I think I will keep my Casita. I have been well pleased so far. Thanks for everyone's input.
You've survived your first attack of 4'-itis!

I did think of you when I saw this ad: http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...0-a-72448.html
It would be a fair bit heavier than either your Casita or the PaloMini you were considering and might require a tow vehicle upgrade. Bigfoots are high quality molded fiberglass trailers. I believe the 21'er has a dry bath, a rarity in molded fiberglass, and nice if you will spend long periods in the trailer. You don't see these very often, especially on the East Coast.
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Old 11-18-2015, 08:44 PM   #22
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We looked at Scamp, Casita, and Boler, but my husband felt claustrophobic in them - he's 6'3. I bought our '89 17' Bigfoot Gaucho in 2013 and we couldn't be happier. Plenty of room for both of us to be up and moving about without stepping on toes. We have a 3'x5' carpet the covers the center floor of our trailer. The 17' Bigfoot is 3500 lbs. gross weight.
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Old 11-18-2015, 08:58 PM   #23
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"You just aren't going to see that with stickies..."

Yet, Tin can tourists and sister on the fly enjoy their vintage stickies every day
I camp with Tin Can Tourists and you can't compare the vintage rigs with today's stick builts. The vintage trailers were made with real wood, real birch paneling, aluminum skins, metal trim rails, vents, etc etc. Not laminated pressed board and plastic like today's stickies.
My list, in order of preference:
1. A 30+ year old Molded fiberglass (I have a 1985 UHaul
2. A 40-50 year old restored vintage trailer (1950's-60's models)
3. A 40-50 year old un-restored vintage trailer
199. A new stick built trailer.
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Old 11-18-2015, 09:55 PM   #24
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I like your list, Pam, but I think I might insert a vintage Airstream in there somewhere (below #1, of course).

But since I don't have the skill set to do a major restoration myself or the money to buy a fully restored vintage anything, I'll probably stick with my newer Scamp for the foreseeable future and focus my energy on making sure it never needs a restoration.
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Old 11-18-2015, 11:22 PM   #25
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We just switched from a 1964 canned ham to a scamp...fighting the water damage already there, which was going to require a skin off total frame rebuild, despite looking pretty decent, plus the knowledge of what kind of maintenance I would have to do to KEEP it watertight made us switch.
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Old 11-19-2015, 11:19 AM   #26
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I have spent more time than I would care to admit looking into various trailers. We live in Washington State and locally receive about 50-inches of rain a year. I currently park our Casita outdoors without any cover, though a carport is on my wish-list. So, having a trailer that was watertight was my absolute No. 1, 2 and 3 priorities.

Having used a teardrop trailer for a time, I was intrigued by the Palomini and the similar R-Pod. The newer R-Pod model 179 with a slide was particularly seductive in terms of addressing twofootitis. Looking at the R-Pod owner forums I got the impression that there were problems of various sorts (I don't recall the specifics anymore) but that Forest River was being stand-up and appeared to be doing a good job of trying to address problems and concerns overall.

I also ran across a lengthy R-Pod Owner’s forum thread on Gas Mileage indicating that the owners were experiencing very poor mileage and that the R-Pod would "hit the wall" and generate a great deal of resistance at 55-mph and higher. I don't know how objective this was, but the thread became quite lengthy at 21 pages with a lot of interesting posts.

I have also looked into a number of trailers with welded-aluminum wall and roof frames with vacuum-laminated panel construction. Unfortunately, there is an intrinsic problem with any design that includes a square corner such as the junction between a paneled wall and roof. The problem is that forces (stress) concentrate at sharp corners. Trailers are subject to many racking forces and this concentration of stress at corners tends to deform or pull apart the joints. This makes it very challenging to seal the corners.

This is a blessing of the molded-fiberglass design. The corners generally have a radius in all planes. So, while fiberglass trailer owners enjoy the seal-less construction of the molded body, we also enjoy the benefits of these lower stresses which allow for lighter and more efficient construction. This principal also applies to openings in the shell such as doorways, window openings, etc. That’s why you usually see a radius at the corners of windows and doors. (The square opening at the bottom of a doorway is generally “braced” by the trailer’s frame.)

My focus when I was researching trailers was the 2,000 to 4,000-pound range. For those that remain intrigued by the concept of a “larger-small-trailer” and are looking for “better” quality construction in a stickie, I suggest looking into anything made by Livin’ Lite, Winnebago’s Micro-Minnie, Gulfstream’s Vista Cruiser, and Venture RV’s Sonic and Sonic Lite lineups. It also looks like Pacific Coachworks Mighty Lite trailers were recently changed to higher-quality construction for 2016.

Mind you, I have not researched these exhaustively, and have not even seen a couple of them “in the flesh”. Construction methods often change over time. Construction methods also sometimes vary for different for models within the same lineup. As with all things, Caveat Emptor, let the buyer beware.
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Old 11-19-2015, 12:57 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Zennifer View Post
We just switched from a 1964 canned ham to a scamp...fighting the water damage already there, which was going to require a skin off total frame rebuild, despite looking pretty decent, plus the knowledge of what kind of maintenance I would have to do to KEEP it watertight made us switch.
I am with you. We switched from a 1968 Aristocrat to a new Escape 19. We loved the Aristocrat and had done extensive restoration, but I could see that it would be an ongoing need and I wanted to camp, not repair.
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Old 11-19-2015, 08:13 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Pam Garlow View Post
I camp with Tin Can Tourists and you can't compare the vintage rigs with today's stick builts. The vintage trailers were made with real wood, real birch paneling, aluminum skins, metal trim rails, vents, etc etc. Not laminated pressed board and plastic like today's stickies.
My list, in order of preference:
1. A 30+ year old Molded fiberglass (I have a 1985 UHaul
2. A 40-50 year old restored vintage trailer (1950's-60's models)
3. A 40-50 year old un-restored vintage trailer
199. A new stick built trailer.
Here ya go then, Pam, a super low price on this unrestored vintage trailer for only $550, that would fall under your #3. Vintage Aljoa Camper
The ad says, "IT NEEDS EVERYTHING."
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