Propane On or Off while Travelling - Page 4 - Fiberglass RV


View Poll Results: Do you travel with propane ON or OFF
Always turn it OFF at the tanks. 31 60.78%
Always run with it on. That is why I have a fridge! 16 31.37%
Turn off when getting gas or when in a tunnel. 5 9.80%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 51. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-20-2013, 04:36 PM   #43
Senior Member
 
Brian M. in NY's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: 2013 ParkLiner
Upstate New York
Posts: 371
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Miller View Post
I think it's a bit odd that so many users worry about LP leaks while traveling, yet don't worry about sleeping in the trailer that night with the propane ON, the furnace running and a pilot burning in the refrigerator.
I also have an LP Gas detector, carbon monoxide detector and, smoke detector that give me a little piece of mind. Admittedly, they came installed as standard equipment on the ParkLiner but if I had an older rig, I would, at least, install a CO/smoke detector.
__________________

__________________
Brian M.

Always remember you're unique, just like everyone else.
Brian M. in NY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2013, 04:47 PM   #44
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
LP Detectors are helpful when your unit has been closed up for a while, but with LP gas being heavier than air and most LP lines and fittings being inside cabinets, and behind appliances I think that most detectors would go off just after the Big Bang.....

But, then again, I don't worry about it.
__________________

__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2013, 05:02 PM   #45
Senior Member
 
Brian M. in NY's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: 2013 ParkLiner
Upstate New York
Posts: 371
Registry
Hence, my previous "Go modern, Go gas, Go Boom!" comment. I'm of the notion that a CO/smoke detector is probably a good idea. My tanks are always off when the rig is parked at home. And when rolling.
__________________
Brian M.

Always remember you're unique, just like everyone else.
Brian M. in NY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2013, 05:11 PM   #46
Senior Member
 
Cathi's Avatar
 
Name: Cathy
Trailer: Escape 19' sold, 21' August 2015
POBox 1267, Denison, Texas
Posts: 795
Jim, looking at what people have given you, what I see again is nothing to show that RVs are exempt from having the propane valves off.

For starters, as you see from what someone gave you, propane is to be off when travelling under a Transport Canada regulation. That would cover the whole country, I assume.

Then I see a person trying to make an exception fit RVs. It looks as if he has given his very bad interpretation of the regulation. The word "necessary" in my book obviously does not apply to RV refrigerators. The regulation was likely written with large commercial trucks in mind that carry tons of food where refrigeration is necessary or similar circumstances with regard to heating and other matters. Others have told you that there is no problem but don't say where they got that idea.

Were there an exception for RVs, I would expect to see something simple such as, "RVs are exempt.". It is interesting to find the exact opposite conclusion on this very regulation given on a site called SmartDrive BC. They said that it is illegal to have the propane on and they did not try to claim that the info your source cited was somehow an RV exception.

And, no, I am not talking conspiracy but well-meaning people who do not know the law or cannot understand what they are reading. Or can't find it and assume such a thing does not exist.

In any case, I assure you that I do not keep the propane off because of any law. It is just plain common sense. And if you read the information again, you will see that propane is referred to as a dangerous substance and is regulated in various ways as such. You are trying to make a case for transporting a dangerous substance in a less safe manner. There is just no case to be made the way I see it. So you can see what you see and others will see something quite opposite.
__________________
Cathi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2013, 05:38 PM   #47
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
In the 48 lower provinces this has been discussed endlessly and I have never seen a U.S. state law prohibiting having the LP gas ON in an RV while driving, an observation that AAA agrees with as well. (Of course, well known exemptions exist, such as certain tunnels etc. )

While some may want to argue that it is or isn't safe, the apparent fact is that it's not illegal and, by default, not considered unsafe by U.S. regulatory agencies.

But then again, the government also indicates, by the provisions of the Second Ammendment, that certain other activities are not unsafe, but that's a different arguement.
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2013, 05:40 PM   #48
Senior Member
 
lpk49's Avatar
 
Name: KAYAK
Trailer: 2007 casita freedom deluxe-2013 tacoma
New Hampshire
Posts: 297
after reading this thread i dont think i am so crazy to want to be propane free. my casita does have the gas detector low to the ground...but still. the only time i used it was the day the guy who checked out the camper for me showed me how. gradually i got things so they work only on elec. and i sleep better that way. but then-i dont have to stay for long periods of time without being hooked up.
__________________
lpk49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2013, 05:42 PM   #49
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B '08 RAV4 SPORT V6
British Columbia
Posts: 4,369
I guess my question is why would it be safe to travel with the propane on, unless you are in a tunnel or on a ferry?
__________________
Glenn Baglo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2013, 07:06 PM   #50
Senior Member
 
Francesca Knowles's Avatar
 
Name: Francesca Knowles
Trailer: '78 Trillium 4500
Jefferson County, Washington State, U.S.A.
Posts: 4,543
Registry

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathy View Post
Jim, looking at what people have given you, what I see again is nothing to show that RVs are exempt from having the propane valves off.

I'd be interested to hear which authorities are to be accepted if not those posted earlier by Jim Bennett-?

Per restrictions on ferries/tunnels etc.:

Portable fuel containers such as gas cans are also restricted on ferries but allowed on vehicles elsewhere.

Restrictions in tunnels and on ferries probably have to do with reducing as far as possible the risks inherent in situations where people are densely packed together with very restricted means of escape.
__________________
.................................
Propane Facts vs. Fiction:. Click here
Tow Limit Calculator: Click here
Francesca Knowles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2013, 07:08 PM   #51
Senior Member
 
Brian M. in NY's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: 2013 ParkLiner
Upstate New York
Posts: 371
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
I guess my question is why would it be safe to travel with the propane on, unless you are in a tunnel or on a ferry?
I'm guessing that cold milk trumps safety if you have insufficient battery/alternator capacity to operate a 3-way fridge on 12vdc for an extended period. An absorption refrigerator uses heat to operate, regardless of the mode. Thus in 12vdc mode, the fridge is going to be pulling about 6.25 amps to drive the 75 watt heating element. Not an insignificant amount. If your tugs alternator doesn't have the capacity to recharge the rv's battery(ies), it is going to deplete the tug's battery until... yep, dead battery. A compressor fridge uses less power but doesn't have the propane option, so again the battery capacity is the limiting factor. My Norcold 12vdc/120vac in my teardrop will run about 12 - 14 hrs on battery before the battery requires recharging - about 2 hours on generator. I wouldn't dare try that on the Dometic three way in my PL, even with dual batteries. On the road, 12vdc. But I have a high cap alternator. Camped 120vac or propane depending on availability of shore power.
The short answer is, safety doesn't change much on a ferry or in a tunnel from what it is on the open road. If you haven't got the battery/alternator capacity, you may want to consider modifying your behavior, i.e. buying a cooler and a couple bags of ice to keep things cool until you set up camp.
__________________
Brian M.

Always remember you're unique, just like everyone else.
Brian M. in NY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2013, 07:22 PM   #52
Senior Member
 
Name: Ron
Trailer: 2008 13' Scamp
British Columbia
Posts: 325
I was interested to note that when I delivered an RV for CruiseAmerica earlier this year that the propane use instructions were basically: turn on tank at the start and except during refueling, turn off tank when returning the vehicle to the depot.

They have experience with tens of thousands of units, and probably with some good legal advice, don't worry about the propane valve being open while traveling.

Personally I've always turned it off if I didn't have a reason to leave it on.
__________________
Ron in BC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2013, 09:35 PM   #53
Senior Member
 
Brian B-P's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: Boler (B1700RGH) 1979
Alberta
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
I guess my question is why would it be safe to travel with the propane on, unless you are in a tunnel or on a ferry?
Because propane is more dense than air, so it accumulates in low places. Enclosed ferries, tunnels, and underground parking structures are thus good example of places were propane presents more danger than outside... that's why RV propane tanks must be closed in ferries and tunnels, and why propane-powered vehicles are generally not allowed in parkades.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian M. in NY View Post
The short answer is, safety doesn't change much on a ferry or in a tunnel from what it is on the open road.
Sure it does - see above.
__________________
1979 Boler B1700RGH, pulled by 2004 Toyota Sienna LE 2WD
Information is good. Lack of information is not so good, but misinformation is much worse. Check facts, and apply common sense liberally.
STATUS: No longer active in forum.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2013, 09:50 PM   #54
Senior Member
 
Brian B-P's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: Boler (B1700RGH) 1979
Alberta
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
Restrictions in tunnels and on ferries probably have to do with reducing as far as possible the risks inherent in situations where people are densely packed together with very restricted means of escape.
While the specific propane rules are more likely due to propane pooling in low places, I think the above is a valid point too.
__________________
1979 Boler B1700RGH, pulled by 2004 Toyota Sienna LE 2WD
Information is good. Lack of information is not so good, but misinformation is much worse. Check facts, and apply common sense liberally.
STATUS: No longer active in forum.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2013, 09:42 AM   #55
Senior Member
 
Brian M. in NY's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: 2013 ParkLiner
Upstate New York
Posts: 371
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
Because propane is more dense than air, so it accumulates in low places. Enclosed ferries, tunnels, and underground parking structures are thus good example of places were propane presents more danger than outside... that's why RV propane tanks must be closed in ferries and tunnels, and why propane-powered vehicles are generally not allowed in parkades.


Sure it does - see above.
The level of danger changes. I think safety is a mindset and a decision to follow best practices to reduce that danger.
__________________
Brian M.

Always remember you're unique, just like everyone else.
Brian M. in NY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2013, 03:13 PM   #56
Senior Member
 
Carol H's Avatar
 
Name: Carol
Trailer: 22' Airstream Formerly 16' Scamp
British Columbia
Posts: 11,731
Registry
Coming from a marine industry I can confirm both Brianís are correct in regards to why propane tanks need to be shut off while on a ferry. It is in everyone's best interest to reduce all risks and there are very real risks with having propane lines left open on trailers while onboard a ship.

An onboard fire is every worst dream come true for every crew member of a ship & they are to be avoided if at all possible, as is any incident that requires the ship to do an emergency evacuation. Every crew member who has ever done an actual emergency evacuation knows well that even if the only people of the ship are all fully trained and have practiced an evacuation many times, it will never go as fast or as well as one might have thought it would. Add to that hundreds of passengers who have no training at all and you have a pretty good idea as to how well in reality the evacuation is going to go.

There are a number of reasons why an open propane tank is a dangerous thing to have on a ferry but here are just a few that I can think of:

For starters since the sinking of the Ms Herald of Free Enterprise in 1987 when 193 people lost their lives any ferry of a certain size and configuration must close their bow and stern doors during the voyage. The reason for this is that it actually takes *very* little free flowing water on the car deck of many of the ferries used around the world today to make them very unstable. The closing of the doors on the car decks results in an enclosed space and any possibility of propane leakage in an enclosed space is never a good thing.

Secondly, car & trailer fires do happen for many reasons - even after the car engines have been shut off. Having an open supply of fuel for the fire (which is what an open leaking propane tank can be) is never a good thing - it makes putting out the fire fast a very hard thing to do & often results in a fire spreading faster.

Thirdly and probably the most probable event that could happen is that ferries from time to time are known to bump into hard unmovable objects resulting in cars & trailers being tossed around on the car deck. Its bad enough to hear the first big bang generated when a ship makes contact with another hard object but what you don't want to hear is more explosions resulting from a open propane tank having taken a big hit - the belief is a propane tank is less likely to explode or cause a fire when subjected to an impact if its shut off vs one that is open.

Accidents with ferries do happen on a fairly frequent basis and many people have been injured or killed as a result of them. First one recorded here by BC Ferries happened in 1970 when a freighter collided with a ferry in a narrow pass, killing 3 people. The most recent BC Ferries hard landing incident that caused a lot of damage but no one hurt happen in Dec 2011. But in 2006 BC Ferries had an incident that result in the actual sinking of the ferry - causing two people to lose their lives. Not to mention the many other hard landing incidents recorded between 1970 and today. Yet most in the marine industry would suggested that based on the size of the fleet, condition of the ships and the number of voyages that are done each year it is in fact a very safe ferry system. Accidents are called accidents for a reason and any time you have the humans factor or reliant on something mechanical they will happen. Washington State Ferries BTW although a much smaller fleet has also had its fair share of hard landings and collisions etc over the years as well.

Ferry accidents do in fact happen, so the rule to shut off all propane tanks is not just the result of someone being overly cautious.
__________________

Carol H is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
propane


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Women travelling alone Camilla General Chat 83 02-04-2013 11:14 AM
Soon-to-be travelling in an Escape 5.0 jcr Hi, I am.... 7 01-19-2012 02:09 PM
Medical coverage while travelling... Wayne Hill Money Matters 3 01-10-2011 11:27 AM
Travelling Europe Lex M Camping, Campout Reports 9 07-12-2007 07:25 PM
Travelling Europe Lex M General Chat 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.