Question for you 1-3 week fiberglass trailer vacationers - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-12-2008, 02:28 PM   #29
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No motorcycles or off road vehicles allowed.
a few years ago i "returned" to a campground my family used when i was a kid, just planning to tent-camp overnight for nostalgia... it was Hatfield, WI...
when i arrived, every site was occupied by a bulgemobile, & most had ATV's & motorcycles... there were riders buzzing up & down the roads, loud music, & a definite party atmostphere... & it wasn't even noon... i was so disappointed, i ended up driving through & finding a campground along the mississippi...
on a side note, they were doing a booming business, & the fees had nearly tripled... i guess they found their niche... apparently, some local private landowners had found they could charge fees to let ATV's & motorcycles run wild...
--- steven
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Old 03-12-2008, 02:46 PM   #30
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The dispersed site here have always had fire rings. It discourages folks from building ground fires. They may be doing this as a "lesser" than two evils, self protection thing.

The first thing they do when we go on high fire danger here is literally lock down the rings and only allow fires in hosted campgrounds.
Doesn't mean stupid folks WON'T build a ground fire, but it keeps honest folks honest.

Not all "Yellow Post" sites (What they call the dispersed sites here) have tables tho.
Dispersed sites with tables?? You gotta be kidding me. Don't they stop being "dispersed sites" then and become something else. And yellow posts to mark the site? I don't think we're really talking about the same thing.
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Old 03-12-2008, 04:26 PM   #31
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yes. we are.

They are exactly the same as location type, areas and usage. Nothing but spots cleared of brush and other burnables..in the way of things, and they are either off hiking trails or logging/fire roads.

Remember, I am from where you live and have spent much time out in the Oregon dispersed areas. They are the same.. except for amenities.. if you can call them that.
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Old 03-12-2008, 04:30 PM   #32
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from San Bernardino NF website:

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Yellow Post Sites

Yellow Post Sites are campsites located off main travel routes, where campfires are allowed as long as the fire stays within the designated fire ring. Current fire use restrictions still apply at these sites. A visitor permit is not required. Sites are available on a first-come first-served basis. It is not possible to make reservations.

An Adventure Pass or America the Beautiful Interagency Pass is required for most sites. Check with the local Ranger Station for Yellow Post Site locations, Adventure Pass requirements, and current fire use restrictions.

Though many Yellow Post Sites are located within highly used recreation areas, they still offer a sense of peace and solitude. Yellow Post Sites were specifically created to provide a place where human impacts could be properly managed, thereby reducing those impacts in the surrounding areas.
You may also stay pretty much anywhere in the forest as long as it is X feet away from a road or stream, you don't have a fire and you observe all the same rules you would in any other National Forest.

Just because this is So. Cal doesn't mean the Nation forest is managed, in this aspect, anyway, any differently.
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Old 03-12-2008, 04:52 PM   #33
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from San Bernardino NF website:



You may also stay pretty much anywhere in the forest as long as it is X feet away from a road or stream, you don't have a fire and you observe all the same rules you would in any other National Forest.

Just because this is So. Cal doesn't mean the Nation forest is managed, in this aspect, anyway, any differently.

Differences in management.

National Forest Region 6 ..

No campfire restrictions most of the time. During extreme fire danger camp fires can be restricted to developed campgrounds.
Campfires are not allowed in designated wilderness areas within 100 feet of any body of water.
No stove permits. (This had been mentioned earlier on another thread)
No fees or permits. (exception trail heads with toilets and some developed campgrounds)
Dispersed sites are NOT created by the FS.
No markers designating dispersed sites.
Camping allowed anyplace in NFS lands unless posted otherwise.
No restrictions on how far or how close to a road you can camp. (I've seen people camped in tents with the tent against the inside of a guard rail.)




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Old 03-12-2008, 05:44 PM   #34
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During extreme fire danger camp fires can be restricted to developed campgrounds.
None rule difference, actually. As far as fires go, we are in a decades long drought and the whole forest here is in high danger thru most of the year. You may have heard of those pesky fires recently...and over the last decade or so. Thus OUR fire rule.

Fire rings are placed in the yellow post dispersed "sites" so that fires can be built safely. And yes, these ARE dispersed areas, even by Oregon definition. Down here they call it "soda", not Pop, even if it's the same thing. Not all dispersed camping is Yellow Post either, as mentioned previously

From the Willamette NF website.

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Dispersed Camping

Many people enjoy the solitude and primitive experience of camping away from developed campgrounds and other campers. "Dispersed camping" is the term used for camping anywhere in the National Forest [b]OUTSIDE of a designated campground, and is generally allowed anywhere except where posted as closed.
Yellow post "sites" are nowhere near campgrounds. They are single areas, single cleared spots. Sometimes by nature, sometimes by earlier campers, sometimes by the Forest Service. Sometimes you will run into a group of them together, but they are not campgrounds, in the traditional sense. Go up the Salmon River Trail to the east of the river and you will find 14 such sites.. all meeting this criteria. All patrolled by and maintained by the FS. And volunteers. I have been on many others as well.

Also, from the WNF website...

Quote:
Where no campsites exist, camp at least 100 feet of a water source, as plants and wildlife near water are especially fragile.
There may be minor little rules differences from Forest to Forest based on the unique aspects of that region, but they are basically all the same. (Such as the adventure pass) Any minor differences are insignificant. At least from the ones I have been in. Can't speak for those I haven't.
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Old 03-12-2008, 06:02 PM   #35
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None rule difference, actually. As far as fires go, we are in a decades long drought and the whole forest here is in high danger thru most of the year. You may have heard of those pesky fires recently...and over the last decade or so. Thus OUR fire rule.

Fire rings are placed in the yellow post dispersed "sites" so that fires can be built safely. And yes, these ARE dispersed areas, even by Oregon definition. Down here they call it "soda", not Pop, even if it's the same thing. Not all dispersed camping is Yellow Post either, as mentioned previously

From the Willamette NF website.



Yellow post "sites" are nowhere near campgrounds. They are single areas, single cleared spots. Sometimes by nature, sometimes by earlier campers, sometimes by the Forest Service. Sometimes you will run into a group of them together, but they are not campgrounds, in the traditional sense. Go up the Salmon River Trail to the east of the river and you will find 14 such sites.. all meeting this criteria. All patrolled by and maintained by the FS. And volunteers. I have been on many others as well.

Also, from the WNF website...



There may be minor little rules differences from Forest to Forest based on the unique aspects of that region, but they are basically all the same. (Such as the adventure pass) Any minor differences are insignificant. At least from the ones I have been in. Can't speak for those I haven't.

I would consider a "Yellow Post" site as a designated campground even though it might me just one site. I also noted that in the earlier quote that permits were and were not required.

Anyway, there are differences and it's good to have knowledge of the more restrictive differences. At some point in time I want to visit some of the southern CA National Forests and now I'll know to not assume that all the same rules apply as what I'm used to. Thanks for information.

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Old 03-12-2008, 08:07 PM   #36
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Byron, on one group the dispersed sites you like are referred to as 'flat-spotting'.

Most NFs I've been in would call the yellow-post (or yellow paint on trees) sites dispersed because they aren't in a CG of organized sites and at least an outhouse.

It's always wise to check the regs in any new NF because some have vastly different rules than others.
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Old 03-13-2008, 07:57 AM   #37
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Back to the original question...

Like Doug and the Trailer Goddess, we also prefer to have reservations (private, state, county or national campgrounds). But, half the fun to us is planning the trip, pouring over maps and guidebooks, discussing what looks interesting along the way. We try to leave time for exploring, knowing that we have a place to stay at the end of the day .

Happy Trails!

(Dave) & Kathie

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Old 03-13-2008, 08:54 AM   #38
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I was wondering,

When warm weather hits and all you small trailer owners decide to hit the road, do you follow an interary and make resevations for places to stay?

Or,

Just hitch up the camper and head out in a direction that sounds good. And if so, How well does/did that work for you? Do/Did you have problems finding campsites available last minute?

And if you have done both, which did you enjoy better?

Cheers,

Mike
I think this thread got a little off topic. As i said in another post I just take off and hope for the best. This way I am not tied down. I really don't like to go on long weekend holidays. If i do I would then have a specific destination and would have reservations. The only other time I would have reservations, is if i was going to organized RV get together.

I have had problems on a few occasions where I could not find a place to camp when travelling. In this case I have ended up over night in some parking lot (Walmart etc).

When travelling I find its best to start looking for a place at around 3PM. If I am just going local I don't worry about it unless its a very popular place.

I have been right across Canada and was never turned down for a camping spot.
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