Sandcastle purchase? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 04-25-2006, 12:27 PM   #15
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1500 crew cab 5.3L 7500 tow capcity---Says chevy.
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Old 04-25-2006, 12:36 PM   #16
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1500 crew cab 5.3L 7500 tow capcity---Says chevy.
You are correct 7,500 tow and 14,000 GCWR(whatever that means)
My husband (MR. Throw it away) threw away my top sheet with the column names.
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Old 04-25-2006, 12:53 PM   #17
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You are correct 7,500 tow and 14,000 GCWR(whatever that means)
My husband (MR. Throw it away) threw away my top sheet with the column names.
[b]GVWR

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating = Truck, trailer, cargo, and passengers. [b]Everything.

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating. Payload capacity plus trailer weight; or gross axle weight rating plus a realistic hitch weight. Also Suspiciously high GVWR and capacity claims generally require either a reduced speed or an excessive and possibly unsafe hitch weight.

[b]Tow Capacity = Maximum Loaded trailer weight; Trailer, food, Black-water, gray-water, fresh water, clothes, chairs, batteries, generator, everything. The rule of thumb is to stay 15% below the maximum, for safety sake.

Insurance is usually voided if you exceed the maximum.

Be safe.
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Old 04-25-2006, 01:12 PM   #18
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[b]GVWR

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating = Truck, trailer, cargo, and passengers. [b]Everything.

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating. Payload capacity plus trailer weight; or gross axle weight rating plus a realistic hitch weight. Also Suspiciously high GVWR and capacity claims generally require either a reduced speed or an excessive and possibly unsafe hitch weight.

[b]Tow Capacity = Maximum Loaded trailer weight; Trailer, food, Black-water, gray-water, fresh water, clothes, chairs, batteries, generator, everything. The rule of thumb is to stay 15% below the maximum, for safety sake.

Insurance is usually voided if you exceed the maximum.

Be safe.
I pulled my window sticker from my truck to see what it said.
It says I have HD trailering equipment (I havent researched what that means yet)
And a rear axle of 4.10 ratio. I know that is an upgrade from the standard equipment. Isnt that suppose to let you pull a bigger load? It also says that the GVW rating is 7000 lbs. So I guess that means I can load the truck bed and passengers to 7000lbs plus 7000lbs trailer =14,000. With the NADA saying the trailer weight is 7640lbs (doesnt say GVW but could be) If I loaded my truck up to the 7000lb capacity and the trailer to its capacity I would be over the 14,000 limit by 640 lbs. Correct? Would a WDH compensate for that weight difference, and allow me to pull the trailer safely?
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Old 04-25-2006, 01:18 PM   #19
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NO!

All a WDH (Weight Distributing Hitch) does is spread part of the load of the hitch to the front axle so the truck won’t be sagging in the back. It does not give you more GVWR load capacity.

You are looking at Maximums and thinking you can load to that, wrong. 15% less is considered safe. You will not check the weight everytime you add something to you truck or trailer. It all adds up, more then people think.
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Old 04-25-2006, 01:27 PM   #20
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NO!

All a WDH (Weight Distributing Hitch) does is spread part of the load of the hitch to the front axle so the truck won’t be sagging in the back. It does not give you more GVWR load capacity.

You are looking at Maximums and thinking you can load to that, wrong. 15% less is considered safe. You will not check the weight everytime you add something to you truck or trailer. It all adds up, more then people think.
So, If the trailer(lets assume it is 7640 lbs GVW) weight is distributed accross the span of the truck, and we go with the 15%(-2100) reduction, the truck weight loaded can not be more than 4260 lbs. =14,000. We would need to make sure we dont carry too much in the truck. Correct?
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Old 04-25-2006, 01:36 PM   #21
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The way to look at it is on the conservity side.

Fully Loaded Truck with Passengers: 7000 x 85% = 5,950 lbs
Fully Loaded Trailer: 7000 x 85% = 5,950 lbs
-------------------------------------------------------------
Real World Maximum Total GVWR = 11,900 lbs


I hope this helps.
You really are on the wrong website. This website is dedicated to Molded Fiberglass RVs.

Good Luck
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Old 04-25-2006, 01:45 PM   #22
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The way to look at it is on the conservity side.

Fully Loaded Truck with Passengers: 7000 x 85% = 5,950 lbs
Fully Loaded Trailer: 7000 x 85% = 5,950 lbs
-------------------------------------------------------------
Real World Maximum Total GVWR = 11,900 lbs
I hope this helps.
You really are on the wrong website. This website is dedicated to Molded Fiberglass RVs.

Good Luck
Thank you for your help. Sorry, I didnt realize I found myself on the wrong web site. I didnt know the difference between your fiberglass unit and the one I am thinking about purchasing untill Suz informed me.
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Old 04-25-2006, 01:57 PM   #23
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Thank you all for the help. I guess I will take Suz advise and ask my questions at the Good Sam site.
Happy camping
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Old 04-25-2006, 03:10 PM   #24
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I have to agree that the 14k lbs towing capacity is just a might ambitious for a standard half-ton pickup. I have a 3/4 ton Excursion with the V10/auto/3.73 rear end, and it's towing capacity is only about 9500 lbs, maybe a little less.

The automakers have been upping the tow ratings, seemingly in a ratings war without regard for what it takes to stop, steer, or maneuver that much weight. I think it's pretty irresponsible of them. VW a while back had a series of commercials showing the T-reg towing a 30' Airstream which was WAAAY outside it's rated capacity. They had to pull the commercials as misleading.

Roger
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Old 04-25-2006, 11:28 PM   #25
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The info I have is for a 2002 ext.cab 4x4 short box, 5.3L engine and 4:10 gear is good for 8800 lbs trailer weight.................anything else close is a 1500 HD crew cab short box with 4:10 gear but with a 6L engine is good for 10,000 lbs trailer weight........combination ratings, GCWR, with a 5.3L with a 4:10 gear is 14000 lbs. ....Benny
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Old 04-26-2006, 12:22 AM   #26
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simple to much trailer for your truck !!!
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Old 04-26-2006, 08:04 AM   #27
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This is scary. And I have to follow it down the road????
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Old 04-26-2006, 09:33 AM   #28
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A stick-built RV with fiberglass skin might actually be heavier than one with aluminum skin - which might be why so few stickies have FG exteriors. T@B (a stick-built teardrop) claims their laminated aluminum/FG cladding is 15% lighter than their older FG skins.

The advantage of molded FGRVs is that they dispense completely with the interior framing common to stick-builts - that means less total weight, less flexing, fewer structural problems and much greater longevity.
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