So when does it get to be relaxing and fun? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 04-15-2009, 09:06 AM   #1
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I bought my 16 Scamp this winter and have only spent one night in it out in my driveway. So far, it's been one thing after another, which was expected.

I finally hooked up the water and the heater tank is shot and leaking. That necessitated running frantically to the rear of the house to turn off the hose. I spliced the ends together and when I turned the water on, one end popped off. Another minor flood. Once I got that secured, the toilet valve was leaking and spraying water all over the place. Another minor flood because the door was open.

Spent all of yesterday putting new front brake pads on and adding a transmission cooler to the van. I have another day of installing the brake controller. I ordered parts from Scamp and that will require some more work. By the way, I ordered on Sunday night and I got a notice at 9AM Monday that my order had shipped. Etrailer was equally as fast with my controller and cooler.

I have spent around $500 for foam and upholstery.

I am actually going to take it out this weekend to a local campground with my two boys for the first time. My parents are pro-RVers (Roadtrek) and are going to camp next to us. Will it be worth it then?

In all honesty, it's been enjoyable to work on but I do hope the money aspect of it slows down a little bit!
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Old 04-15-2009, 09:55 AM   #2
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Hang in there! When we bought our older Baby Burro it had all kinds of issues we were unaware of and spent a lot of time fixing one thing after another - then our maiden voyage resulted in a undiscovered window leak so more money (we decided to replace windows - our biggest expense). Our second weekend was to the coast and it was wonderful to wake up dry and comfy and turn the heater on! (as ex-tenters this was a luxury). Our first big trip was to Montana and we fell in love with our little egg. That was 12 years ago and we just bought a used Escape which also had some unforeseen 'problems' which are now fixed and we look forward to our maiden voyage.

Think of it as breaking in a pair of new shoes, or getting that new puppy to behave and be the joy it's meant to be! Over time the fun and comfort you will get from your trailer will out weigh the time and money invested now. And by working on it yourself you are familiar with it and it has become 'yours'!

Enjoy the many adventures ahead!
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Old 04-15-2009, 06:40 PM   #3
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Trailer: 2015 Escape 19
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Well Bryan, the repairs to the trailer slow down or cease at a certain point, unless you become a major mod type hobbyist.
However, when you start really camping/traveling heavily with the trailer, then you start wanting all these cool camping things to add and take with you. Just tried out my new hammock on the last weekend, boy is that awesome swinging between a couple of tall oaks right by a creek, now I want...... Oh, it never ends.

Make sure you post some pics from your excursion with the boys this weekend.
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Old 04-15-2009, 08:49 PM   #4
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It gets fun this weekend, when you go camping with your boys and relatives.
A lot of great memories (in the future) of camping with the boys will ease the pain of the parts and fixes you're experiencing now.

Have a great time.
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Old 04-16-2009, 12:25 AM   #5
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Bryan, it will get better. It's always hectic your first few times out, just getting the hang of where every thing is, etc. Sure little things occur with an older trailer, but eventually you will have it exactly the way you want it with no or should I say fewer issues. Enjoy!



Haven't you ever heard the old saying that rv's are rolling money pits? Just think our little eggs are cheap in comparison to those 45 ft buses that they pay a fortune for then there is always something going wrong with them.
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Old 04-16-2009, 07:45 AM   #6
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Well Bryan, the repairs to the trailer slow down or cease at a certain point, unless you become a major mod type hobbyist.
However, when you start really camping/traveling heavily with the trailer, then you start wanting all these cool camping things to add and take with you. Just tried out my new hammock on the last weekend, boy is that awesome swinging between a couple of tall oaks right by a creek, now I want...... Oh, it never ends.

Make sure you post some pics from your excursion with the boys this weekend.

How do you attach your hammock to the trees? Most don't come with hooks for chains. . Thanks, pat
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Old 04-16-2009, 08:26 AM   #7
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My parents are pro-RVers (Roadtrek) and are going to camp next to us.

Hi Bryan. My parents were full-timers for years and I've learned that camping next to them is an opportunity to milk them for tools, advice, and sandwiches handed to you while you're under the trailer When things get rough on your site, head over the that Roadtrek and absorb some of the comforts.

Over the next few months with my Uhaul 13' I will be fixing the windows (shot - I see bloody knuckles and scotch in my future), the brake/turn signals (new wiring - yay, a free perm!), the city water thingamabob (currently my 'outdoor shower'), redoing the floor I put in badly (shaky hands -- maybe the scotch?), making new curtains & couch cushion covers, replacing the range hood (or not -- on the fence on that one), installing shelving in the closet, sanding and staining the hatch covers I made last year . . . I'm out of breath.

I definitely get frustrated at times, and I even SOLD the thing last year . . . only to buy it back when I got the chance. These eggs are special -- for all of its minor and not-so-minor problems, it's a great little camper. I do think they're worth the trouble, when you see the shoddy construction of so many of the new campers, too. They tow great, and once fixed, they're pretty good at staying that way. And when you don't feel up to a real repair, there's always duct tape and the campground bathroom.

Oh, and tell the kids it's an adventure -- that worked on me until I was about 35.
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Old 04-16-2009, 11:39 AM   #8
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In all honesty, it's been enjoyable to work on but I do hope the money aspect of it slows down a little bit!
Bryan - When we got our 37-year old Compact Jr. last summer, I knew there'd be work to do. I didn't know HOW MUCH work, but still...in three weeks I learned about the water system (by rebuilding it), electrical (by correcting what was there and finishing the rest), and propane (by repairing it). Though it was a hassle at the time (particularly the water issue and our very limited time before leaving for our 9,611-mile maiden voyage), I'm SO glad I got to do all that before we headed out. It gave me a greater feeling of self reliance. Should something go wrong with any of those systems, I'd know what to do.

In Texas, the passenger-side rear trailer lights (and marker lights) went out. All of them. At once. When my uncle, who was following at the time, told me, it didn't concern me one bit. I unlocked the back door, opened the cupboard and hooked it back up again in about 2 minutes flat. Without the previous experience I would have had my knickers in a knot.

Of course, once you're on the road, you'll find OTHER THINGS to fix, alter or improve.

For peace of mind, go through all the systems, check them, repair them now. Then you'll enjoy it more later with fewer hassles (ideally).

THEN HEAD OUT! THAT's when the fun REALLY begins!
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Old 04-16-2009, 03:01 PM   #9
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By all means, 'Take it Camping'. What would you do if you were in a tent.
If the water doesn't work, use one of those blue water cans. If the furnace isn't working, take double sleeping bags. No hydro... No problem. Just get out and enjoy it. Then fix one thing at a time. Eventually it will all come together.
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Old 04-16-2009, 07:33 PM   #10
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I agree with James. As long as it's clean inside, safe to tow down the road... enjoy it! Sometimes you don't know what mods you want to do, or what really needs to be fixed RIGHT NOW until you use it. There's nothing wrong with a hard-sided tent.
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Old 04-16-2009, 07:52 PM   #11
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Quote:
I agree with James. As long as it's clean inside, safe to tow down the road... enjoy it! Sometimes you don't know what mods you want to do, or what really needs to be fixed RIGHT NOW until you use it. There's nothing wrong with a hard-sided tent.
YUP--- and keep a pad and pencil handy for those things that don't work/or you don't like.... Then prioritze them... (Carrie (aka 'the Wench" ) says my memory is bad) --there are several things on the list I've been procrastinating on for several years.... It's a HOOT-- go camping and enjoy. Larry
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Old 04-16-2009, 09:56 PM   #12
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How do you attach your hammock to the trees? Most don't come with hooks for chains. . Thanks, pat
Hi Pat,
We got the Eno Double Hammock and the Slap Straps that are made for it to attach it to just about anything. Takes about two minutes to hang it with the slap straps. They got rave reviews in all the forums and I can attest to it now as well. Rolls up to about an 8" inch ball and we keep it under the bench by the water tank. Here's a link to info on the hammock system

Don't mean to sidetrack Bryan's thread, have a great weekend with the Scamp and ur boys!!
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