The downsides of fg travel trailers and camping... - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-04-2015, 07:57 AM   #1
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The downsides of fg travel trailers and camping...

I want a fg travel trailer. My husband thinks I have an unrealistic, idyllic view of traveling with one and camping with one. He is not a camper, and has never understood the allure of camping. He was never given the opportunity to enjoy camping as a youngster.....

Without maligning him, would you please share what you see as the negatives of traveling and camping with a fgtt? What is it you dread (if anything) about the process of loading up, getting on the road, or setting up/leaving at a campsite? What is the worst part of the whole "scene" for you? What would you change if you could?

Thanks so much,
Tonie
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:24 AM   #2
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Other than increased fuel consumption I don't see any downside.

My trailer is always loaded and ready, from a campsite it only takes about five minutes 10 tops to be ready when leaving.
If your social and like meeting people nothing beats it.
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:28 AM   #3
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There are no definite answers to your query, as everyone, including those who do travel with a FGRV, has a differing idea what is right for them, levels of comfort, and things they enjoy (or not) about it.

What it come down to is having the right mindset to travel in an FGRV, or any RV for that matter. I know plenty of folks that look and this style of camping as something they just don't understand, something they would never consider doing. It is not for everyone.

Most owners of FGRVs come from a camping background of one form, or another. Whether is was with parents in a tent or trailer, or like me, spending many 100s of nights in the backcountry sleeping in a tent. There are some that 'discover' it as an adult, something that has appealed to them, though they never have done it. They try it, and fall in love with it.

For me, idyllically, sleeping in a tent in the backcountry is still my favourite way to camp. BUT, for travel to places accessible by road, for me you just can't beat an RV, and our FG ones to me are ideal. You get to sleep in your own bed, grab a bite when you want, and stay at some of the most beautiful spots. Something not easily done in a hotel room.

But, as said earlier, it is not for everyone. I would suggest you borrow or rent an RV to take your husband out in. Plan a short trip to a well reviewed campground, and give it a try. He may decide he likes it, or maybe decides there is no way he will do it. It would be a good way to find out.
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:49 AM   #4
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You do have to be able to deal with being very, very close to each other for an extended period. Some have likened it to solitary confinement for a twosome..... But others find that a plus.....


Also there is sometimes the issue of personal privacy that some guys (and ladies as well) have trouble dealing with. If either one of you still has to run the water faucet when using the bathroom, it might prove to be a but too close.


And it sometimes gets a little crowed for two in the hot tub......... LOL
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:54 AM   #5
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Traveling and camping, in my mind, are two different things. For traveling, such as a country trip, the downsides are low gas mileage, more difficulty finding parking places or navigating cities, sometimes RV parks and campgrounds aren't close to where you want to be. Slower travel, too, if getting there is the goal (not a problem if enjoying the drive is the goal). A little more stressful to tow a trailer. More that can go wrong (not just car but car plus trailer).

Camping- for someone who isn't a camper- staying in a small room if it rains, limited "stuff" available, cooking for yourself with limited equipment, possibly a smaller bed and definitely a smaller bathroom, having to empty the black water tank (or porta potti).

I can think of a lot more positives if you want those! For travel, one of the best is having your own place to stay when you visit friends and relatives. No need to worry about keeping their hours. I can get up at 6 and make coffee and relax until my hosts are up without disturbing anyone. But another downside there is whether or not there is a place to park at or near my friend's home.
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:17 AM   #6
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Down side. If you're a type "A" person there can be a down side to camping of any kind.
If you have trouble lowering your heart rate by relaxing, camping might not be for you.
If you have trouble lowering your blood pressure by relaxing, camping might not be for you,
If you are extremely bored by watching a ripple move across a lake, or watching a stream's rhythm, camping might not be for you.
If simply meditating while watching the plants grow drives you nuts, camping might not be for you.
If walking in the woods scares you and you the wild animals will hurt you, camping might not be for you.
If can't laugh at the antics of the local little critters (chipmonks, ground squirrels, etc.), camping might not be for you.
If you don't like to talk to people, then camping might not be for you.

However if you enjoy watching birds play, ripples on the water, finding the rhythm of a stream and watching water roll over the rocks. If you like leaving all your cares and worries back in city, which lowers your heart rate and blood pressure. If you like laughing at the squirrels and their play. If you like looking at and identifying wild flowers, walking on a trail in the woods. If you like watching the clouds drift, or look at all the stars you can't see in the city. Then camping might just be something want to do.

Camping in FGRV-- Most of us spend more time outside than inside the trailer. Many cook outside, some do very little cooking, some find cooking fun and like to try cooking with Dutch Ovens, or Pie Irons. Some like bird watching and seeing other parts of the world.
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:23 AM   #7
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Hmmm, downsides. Let me think, for there are some for sure.

Having a small trailer instead of the big motorhome we used to have is definitely more cost effective and allows us to get into some places that were inaccessible to us when we had our big rig, but sometimes I miss all the space we used to have in our big rig. You do need to be able to get along in a very small space! Some people just can't get used to that or make it work.

Even though FG trailers are relatively trouble free, in our experience ALL RVs need care and maintenance so there's that to take into consideration. Are you handy and willing to do these things yourself? If not, you'll incur more expense by having a pro do the regular maintenance and repair jobs, but avoid the hassle of doing these things yourself.

You'll need a place to store your trailer. Can you park it at home or will you need to rent a storage place for it? It's much easier to pack up for a trip if your trailer is parked in your own driveway than clear across town somewhere.

We don't leave everything in our trailer (it's too damp in the PNW) so I'm not crazy about the packing and unpacking. We do leave some things in the trailer - dishes, pots and pans, etc., but not food or anything that might get moldy or mildewy. Creating a good checklist will make the packing easier and you'll get more efficient at it as time goes by.

I used to have more fears and concerns about things like break-downs or not finding a place to stay. Trading up to a more reliable tow vehicle and getting Good Sam Roadside Assistance has eased those concerns. And I've relaxed quite a bit about finding campgrounds. Some people deal with that by only going to places where they can make a reservation ahead of time.

Some people worry about crime, but that has been a non-issue for us. Common sense will serve you well in this regard.

Is your hubby OK with dirt? :-) When you go camping it's inevitable that you'll get a little dirty unless you stay only in really expensive first class RV resort type places. You need to be OK with not having a shower everyday; mud/sand, pine needles getting tracked i; getting the soot and smell of a campfire on your clothes.

Does your husband like travel in any form? Or is he more of a homebody? One thing I like about traveling with our trailer is that we always have our home with us! We like seeing new places and trailering is probably the most economical way to do that. Sure, you can fly somewhere, rent a car and stay in hotels/motels, but it's a lot more expensive. Some people prefer a luxurious vacation at a resort somewhere or a big city excursion so maybe going to a National Park or other outdoor/natural attraction just doesn't appeal to your guy?

Hope these ideas give you some food for thought.
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:32 AM   #8
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The downsides of fg travel trailers and camping...

My wife was never a camper and I was... a lot! I made the mistake of coaxing her into a tent camping trip in the mountains of CO the first summer we were married. She did not enjoy it, and we did not camp for many years after that.

What I eventually realized is that she loves the ocean. When the rising cost of hotels pushed us farther and farther inland, she agreed to try tenting at the beach. We chose a campground very close to an urban area, so she felt more comfortable, and right on the beach. My wife also enjoys good food, so I made sure we ate well- Dungeness crabs one night, grilled steaks another,... After four nights' camping we spent the last night in a nice hotel to let her be pampered a bit. We had a good experience, and then it wasn't hard to convince her to upgrade to a small trailer.

Thoughts: (1) find the places your husband really enjoys, and build on that, (2) choose your first destination carefully, and keep the first trip short and simple, (3) consider renting an RV the first time- expensive, but there's no commitment, (4) combine camping with other kinds of travel- it doesn't have to be an either-or choice.

Downsides: (1) as mentioned, they're pretty small, (2) gas mileage goes down and driving times increase- you can't go 75 on the interstates with a trailer, (3) you have to store and maintain the trailer between trips.

Upsides: (1) enhanced experience of the places you visit- falling asleep listening to waves, walking the beach with AM coffee, not having to drive to the beach, (2) children have a lot more freedom in a campground than a hotel, (3) lower travel costs (once you amortize the purchase price of the trailer).
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:40 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman View Post
Down side. If you're a type "A" person there can be a down side to camping of any kind.
If you have trouble lowering your heart rate by relaxing, camping might not be for you.
If you have trouble lowering your blood pressure by relaxing, camping might not be for you,
If you are extremely bored by watching a ripple move across a lake, or watching a stream's rhythm, camping might not be for you.
If simply meditating while watching the plants grow drives you nuts, camping might not be for you.
If walking in the woods scares you and you the wild animals will hurt you, camping might not be for you.
If can't laugh at the antics of the local little critters (chipmonks, ground squirrels, etc.), camping might not be for you.
If you don't like to talk to people, then camping might not be for you.

However if you enjoy watching birds play, ripples on the water, finding the rhythm of a stream and watching water roll over the rocks. If you like leaving all your cares and worries back in city, which lowers your heart rate and blood pressure. If you like laughing at the squirrels and their play. If you like looking at and identifying wild flowers, walking on a trail in the woods. If you like watching the clouds drift, or look at all the stars you can't see in the city. Then camping might just be something want to do.

Camping in FGRV-- Most of us spend more time outside than inside the trailer. Many cook outside, some do very little cooking, some find cooking fun and like to try cooking with Dutch Ovens, or Pie Irons. Some like bird watching and seeing other parts of the world.
Lots of truth in this.

Though, I am mostly an A type personality, and for me camping is a way to unwind. This is why heading into the deep backcountry is the best way for me to actually relax, as even if I did want to take care of the multitude of tasks that occupy my brain when at home, I can't. Heck, back there I don't even have a cell phone. For some reason removing these things completely triggers something in my brain, that allows me to just take in what nature offers me, and be very satisfied. I actually know of lots of folks in high powered, and high stressful, type jobs that do just the same. Kinda allows a recharge.

RVing for me is not a lot different, in that it give me (or you could say forces me), to relax. It gives me something different to focus on, and again most of the stresses of everyday life at home and at work, dissolve. I like that.

I do enjoy keeping busy much of the time while camping too, but it is keeping busy with things that are very enjoyable to me, unlike dealing with work issues, or that "Honey Do" list at home.
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Old 06-04-2015, 10:06 AM   #10
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Once I get mine, I will miss being able to drive across Nevada doing 85. Hey, what's the rush, I'm retired and have no where in particular to be. Slow down and smell the sagebrush.
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Old 06-04-2015, 10:06 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by TWelch View Post
I want a fg travel trailer. My husband thinks I have an unrealistic, idyllic view of traveling with one and camping with one. He is not a camper, and has never understood the allure of camping. He was never given the opportunity to enjoy camping as a youngster.....

Without maligning him, would you please share what you see as the negatives of traveling and camping with a fgtt? What is it you dread (if anything) about the process of loading up, getting on the road, or setting up/leaving at a campsite? What is the worst part of the whole "scene" for you? What would you change if you could?

Thanks so much,
Tonie
Don't buy a "camper", buy a "travel trailer" instead.
That way you have your motel room, with all the conveniences, with you where ever you decide to go! No lugging luggage up and down stairs, no packing and unpacking during your trip.
No more worrying over whether your next motel room is clean, or who(or what) soiled the carpet or bed spread.
You have food and toiletries onboard and sorted out, etc.
When you arrive at an attraction you have a private change room, TV room or a place to take a nap right along with you.
Packing the trailer for a trip is little more effort than packing the car and luggage... plus you are done until you return home.

If you choose a 13ft trailer you will sacrifice very little compared to driving without it. It is five minutes for set-up or tear down. Fuel economy is roughly the same if you slow down a bit when towing. You can still park anywhere there are two spots in line. you can drive through almost every drive-up window.

Downside?
1]You must license and maintain and store your trailer...
Ours is eleven years old and has proven easy to keep up.
In fact if you travel as little as one week per year, you will still save over the cost of motels.

2]There is the initial purchase cost.
Even if purchased new the lodging cost compared to motels will pay for the trailer in less than 200 nights of use, leaving you with a trailer which is still worth probably 3/4s of the purchase price.

3]Cozy quarters (limited room to share).
We find that our time together in our Scamp enhances our relationship.
We actually like each other, even after 44 years of marriage.
Being close is pleasant for both of us and reminds us of the days before children when we only wanted each others company, and that was enough.

4] learning to hook-up, set-up, and tow a trailer.
While this can be daunting to a novice, it soon becomes second nature.
Just take your time and do it right... then after a little while it will become easy.
Like many new skills, you will start with too many notes , too many fears and too much stuff. Don't worry though, you will soon be giving advice more than taking it!
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Old 06-04-2015, 10:09 AM   #12
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Quote: "(3) lower travel costs (once you amortize the purchase price of the trailer). "
AND.... with an FGRV (vs a sticky) you will have even less cost as there will be a lot less depreciation from new and, if you buy smart, many report making money on the first purchase of a used GRV i.e., buy in the fall and sell in the spring.
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Old 06-04-2015, 10:24 AM   #13
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The post by Jon In AZ, above, and many of the others posts' have some really good thoughts.

Mostly it's just upsides for us. Nothing against tent camping at all, but there a lot of us that do not like tent camping and camping in a FGRV is a completely different experience that we really Do like. Even our non-camper neighbor expressed a positive comment that "it must be always good when you can take your hotel room with you". So, if your husband thinks camping in an FGRV is going to be like tent camping, it's not. It's much more like being at home only mobile.

Probably most of your time will be spent out of the camper. Even when it's a rainy day, we don't spend much time inside the camper--that's the day for checking out the local museum, etc. Inside the camper time is limited to sleeping, a little tv or reading before bed, and maybe a coffee after getting up in the morning.

Space and privacy are big issues for many. The best thing we did was to find an FGRV with a decent sized bed. Getting a good nights sleep starts every day right. Using campground facilities may be a downside, but I look at it as an upside--you get some space, and a larger bathroom and shower area, and all the bad smells are not in the camper-ha!

GL Mark
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Old 06-04-2015, 10:34 AM   #14
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The downsides of fg travel trailers and camping...

If you expect all the creature comforts all the time, and you enjoy being indoors more than outdoors, camping probably isn't for you. To be honest, I wouldn't try to make someone enjoy something they don't. But, if he knows you enjoy it he may give it a shot because it pleases you. Funny things can happen then -- he might actually like it. I learned to love it at a young age because my parents did. That's not to say you can't learn to like it later in life, but it is more difficult.

For us, the freedom of the road, the uncertainty of what will happen tomorrow, the possible adventures, new people, new places, and new experiences are why we LOVE camping. That could just as well be a list of reasons why someone doesn't like it.

Give him a copy of Walden.😄 one thing camping does for us (and I know this may sound weird) is that it makes us reconnect with the basics- and to be more authentic. Modern day life is so insulated and easy that many don't even know themselves, let alone their partner.


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