Thoughts on Retirement - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-24-2013, 04:31 PM   #15
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Gilda,

Thanks for the third stage. I know many RVers that fit that profile, giving back, using their skills for others and ....

I thought I was going to die before 45, my Dad died at that age. As a result I did many of those things before I retired, founded a soup kitchen, served as small town mayor, ... simply just over crammed my life.

Now I seek none of that and focus on sharing the remaining years with Ginny. I think my stage two was over wrought with doing and joining, though exciting, it was probably unfair to the family.

Jim,
I expect your actuary friends are right. The last 10 years of my career sometimes had wrenching pressure. I'm sure stopping work has extended my life. I'm definitely healthier than I was 13 years ago, pre-RV.
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Old 07-24-2013, 04:35 PM   #16
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I donno.

My doctor, during an examination, asked if I was under stress at work.
I replied, I'm not stressed; I cause stress.
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Old 07-24-2013, 04:41 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
I donno.

My doctor, during an examination, asked if I was under stress at work.
I replied, I'm not stressed; I cause stress.
Hey Glenn, I used to work for you apparently !!!!
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Old 07-24-2013, 06:50 PM   #18
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I never gave retirement that much of a thought.
I've been out of work for two or three years.
So I guess health has put me into retirement?

I don't work near as much as I did, but still do more than I like.
Grass isn't near a procrastinator as I am now. It grows whether I mow it or not.
But I do keep a lid on it. Cancer slows a person down, but getting
strength back little by little. I can still work some kids more than
they like, but it's a work ethic. Not a physical thing.

I take care of 3 places: Mine, Mother-in-laws, and the church.

I used to say I went to work to rest. But now I work in between rest times.

I would like to try half-timing if not full-timing..............

At any rate, I'm enjoying my un-retirement so far.
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Old 07-24-2013, 07:43 PM   #19
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Run the numbers

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Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
According to some actuary friends of mine, every year of work past age 55, shortens your life by more than a year, according to them!!
The actuaries for our local union's pension and medical fund ran the numbers on retiring at 60 versus 65 The person who retires at 60 receives a smaller monthly pension but receives more pension money over his retirement years than someone working to 65 even with their higher monthly pension benefit
The real difference shows up in the medical costs , individuals who work to 65 have double the medical costs over their retirement years versus individuals who retire at 60 ( Hip & knee replacements as an example) The local union medical fund is self insured so if the costs go down our benefits go up and the opposite if cost rise. Early retirement in our case often benefits the individual physically , mentally and financially.
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Old 07-24-2013, 09:41 PM   #20
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One of my favorite books that I read many years ago and re-read periodically is "The Joy of Not Working" by Ernie J. Zelinski. In chapter 4, titled "Working Less, Just for the Health of It" he has a paragraph titled, "Why you Should be a Connoisseur of Leisure". Retiring doesn't mean you stop living. It's all in how you think about the term and what your "Third Chapter" means for you. When I "renewed" I couldn't print my new "business cards" fast enough. The letters "C.O.L." appear after my name and my occupation reads "Connoisseur of Life".
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Old 07-24-2013, 10:18 PM   #21
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I took partial retirement three years ago (I now teach only spring semester) and will go off fulltime in 1-2 more years. I'm looking forward to that mainly because the annual migration will end and I'll stay in Washington (except for trailer travels.)

The first year I was mainly in the role of caregiver, but over the next two falls off, I wrote a book.

I actively do volunteer work for a national group, CorgiAid. I also play the cello in a community orchestra and a duo.

I hope I'll live longer as a result, but if I don't, I'll have enjoyed retirement longer. My work wasn't all that stressful but as the politics worsen, it gets harder to stomach them. If I start missing teaching a lot, once I'm full-time I'll probably tutor.

I won't ever fulltime but I do plan to do an extended cross-country trip in a year or so. I have a few more things on my bucket list, too, so I don't expect to get bored.

I'm not sure this system is very good- working hard for 30 years, then relatively early and long retirement- but I'm taking advantage of it, anyway. What might be more sustainable for everyone would be being able to gradually reduce hours in later years- our partial retirement allows that spread over 5 years, but I could see doing it over 10 or more. My dad was lucky enough to be able to do that by extending longer and longer vacations (to use up accumulated time from all the hard years).
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Old 07-24-2013, 11:36 PM   #22
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This all hits pretty close to home. My birthday a few days ago marked when I qualified for 100% of my retirement, but I'd have to kick back a bunch of that money to keep the medical insurance. So likely I'll wait until the Medicare starts.

I happen to be on the first vacation in a looong time that was engaging enough that I've actually forgotten about work. I've previously thought that I'd really miss the challenges and stimulations of my job, which I mostly like. But yesterday I realized that I hadn't thought at all about work...and haven't felt the need to log on and check corporate E-mail at all. Hmmm. Maybe I could walk away from it some day. Reading this thread is also encouraging.
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Old 07-25-2013, 01:01 AM   #23
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If you remember Red Skeleton, according to him the three stages of life are:
1. Youth
2. Middle age.
& you look good, you look good!!!
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Old 07-25-2013, 06:47 AM   #24
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Leonard,

We were in a similar situation to you but without any pension. We were 58 when we decided to buy an RV, stop working and hit the road. It really meant no 'free' medical insurance. For the next 7 years medical insurance became our responsibility, generally covered by a catastrophy policy.

Fortunately we never had a significant medical need during that period and actually both of us became healthier. I consider deciding to go 'on the road' one of our best decisions.

Now I know it's not for everyone but it's always good for others to know alternatives are possible. By the way this is an often discussed topic on the Escapees Forum.

Just sharing a possibility..... best to you.
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Old 07-25-2013, 08:24 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by LeonardS View Post
This all hits pretty close to home. My birthday a few days ago marked when I qualified for 100% of my retirement, but I'd have to kick back a bunch of that money to keep the medical insurance. So likely I'll wait until the Medicare starts.

I happen to be on the first vacation in a looong time that was engaging enough that I've actually forgotten about work. I've previously thought that I'd really miss the challenges and stimulations of my job, which I mostly like. But yesterday I realized that I hadn't thought at all about work...and haven't felt the need to log on and check corporate E-mail at all. Hmmm. Maybe I could walk away from it some day. Reading this thread is also encouraging.
Leonard,
It's funny you mention taking a vacation and not thinking of work. For most of my working years, I took vacation time off as one week at a time, occasionally two weeks off. Those short periods away from work were never really long enough for me to forget work. And stupidly enough ( for me ) I was always available by the phone if they needed something. Then about five years before I actually did retire, one summer I took the entire month of July off. And told them, "don't call, I'm not answering". It was quite a difference. Having four weeks off really did allow me to forget all about the place, and made me realize that as much as I did like my job ( I enjoyed it immensely ), I also very much enjoyed life away from work. Every summer thereafter I always took the month of July as vacation time.
When I was offered a "early buyout" from the corporation at age 57, I jumped all over it. Yes, you are right that retiring early does cost more money out of pocket for medical premiums, etc, but I just was not willing to "give away" any more years of my remaining years to working, just to save some dollars. Old age does not run in my family, so I decided it was simply time to leave the real working world.
Of course, we each have our own financial situation to consider, because it really would be irresponsible to quit a good paying job if a person did not have the means to support themself. But all I will say is if you can do it, by all means, consider bailing out early rather than later.

In a slightly more philosophical sense, I saw the following at the company, and it made me realize that it was "time" for me to go. I started working there as a teenager, and many other young people did too. We were a "young" company, and many of us stayed all those years. We did well, the company prospered. But we all aged....the company had become "older" and more, maybe stagnant. Perhaps part of that was because the workforce really was aging. So the company again began to hire a lot of youngsters, essentially reinventing itself. I looked around at all these "kids" and I said, "that was us, 30, 40 years ago". It made me admit, it's time for the old guys and gals to step aside, hand the reins to the kids, and let's see if they can make it go as well as we did. They are in fact doing pretty darn well at it, and I'd like to think that part of it is that many of us old geezers stepped aside and said, "have at it kids".
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Old 07-25-2013, 08:33 AM   #26
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The issue with working past your retirement age is you are taking a pay cut. In other words, you could stay home and collect xx% of your pay doing nothing. Instead you are working and only earning the difference between your pension and regular pay. A pay cut.
I did an analysis of month by month for the last 5 years of my employment which was beyond my minimum retirement age. Once it got to where my working another month only increased my pension by $22/month, I said that is it. It was not worth coming into work for that amount. You need to sit and do the math (I'm a bean counter). Retirement means less money on gas, your insurance drops, your clothing expenses drop, , you no longer pay into your retirement, your withholding will decrease. Your gross pay will drop but your net pay will not decrease as much. It is not as bad as you may think. You also can plan your retirement and move to retirement friendly state, in some states your retirement is not taxable, that may mean up to another 10% savings over working.
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Old 07-27-2013, 05:40 PM   #27
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papa-t - You are only 48 now,wow, you look a lot older in your profile pic
I was "retired" at age 50.5 from the railroad, that was way too early, so you may want to consider a second career. I did just that, after three years of little work I went back to university (seminary) got a Master of Divinity and have been a pastor for six years. I will retire for the second time the end of the year and look forward to lots of traveling, starting with heading down your way to meet our new grandchild (one of three news ones this year) living in Hole Mills.


Jim - good comments about when to pull the pin, although I had hoped to work to 65 one of the factors driving retirement now is it worth the extra $$ now when who knows how long we'll have on this earth - I had a little scare with cancer two years ago. So it's off to MB we go where the living is cheaper (hydro about 1/3 the ON price) and we're in same town as our son and soon-to-be-4 grandkids, with others not too far away.

Now if we could just sell our house in ON (listed 4 months nearly and no offers) we could buy our Escape

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Old 07-27-2013, 06:08 PM   #28
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Adrian, The ministry is certainly a worthwhile occupation, If I had been smart enough to retire at 50, I could have completed 10 loops of North America by now.

The early death of friends pushed us to retire as early as we did. Of all the things we've done in our lives, this has been the best. As well it has been an inspiration to a number of our friends and relatives.

Sometimes when the water's rising it makes no sense to wait for the right boat. Sometimes you just need to get moving.

As my college roommate was dying he mentioned all that he and his wife had planned to do at 65. As my business partner was dying, a man who continually tried to entice me out of our RV and to work, said in his final days "You did the right thing".

Unfortunately we never know when it's going to be over. Now is all we know we'll have.
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