Tiny house on wheels. - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-11-2015, 05:47 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Bobbie Mayer's Avatar
 
Name: Bobbie
Trailer: 2011 Escape 15A
Washington
Posts: 3,236
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Senn View Post
One more thought. The builders are always scratching for just a little more room ( I can certainly understand as my wife and I spent 6 years in a 29 foot fifth wheel and space is golden ). Yet they always build the trailers 8 feet wide. I thought I remembered that some states allow a maxim width of 8 feet 6 inches so I checked and virtually all states allow that dimension to be towed by ordinary vehicles ( I know that at one time Airstream built a trailer that wide ). Point being why don't the tiny house builders take advantage of this. In a 24 foot unit that would be a , precious , additional 6 square feet. Lee
You'd have to buy longer 2x4's and cut them to 8.5 feet. They come in 8 feet so that dimension makes building more economical. (Though not when it comes to $65,000).

The thing I've noticed about ones I've seen articles about are that they lack storage. If you have to also have a shed for storage, what good is the tiny home? As an add-on to the main house, okay, but then it doesn't need all the other features like laundry.
__________________

__________________
Bobbie Mayer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 05:49 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Name: Cathy
Trailer: In the Market
Kansas
Posts: 799
I have followed the tiny house movement and owned 8 RVs and I can assure you that even the construction of the best of the RVs (and I worked for a 5-star manufacturer) isn't as solid and won't last nearly as long.

I have been following this one for years: Tumbleweed Tiny House Company - Welcome to our website ! I think as a retirement living option they would be pretty good with very low utility bills, one wouldn't have to eat cat food!

Now, tiny house on tiny lot with tiny travel trailer on the road...........
__________________

__________________
Cathy P. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 05:51 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Bobbie Mayer's Avatar
 
Name: Bobbie
Trailer: 2011 Escape 15A
Washington
Posts: 3,236
Registry
I don't see the smallness as an issue, and I do think the less expensive ones often make sense. Build it on a friend's property, use it until you buy your own, move it there, etc. There are downsides to RV's, not the only one of which is rounded walls. You get more space for your buck with squared-up walls. And most people can't really build an RV themselves.

On the other hand I've seen several of these started and offered for sale- I think many of the people who think they can build one give up.
__________________
Bobbie Mayer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 06:03 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
RE: Mr Fuller (Not the Brush Guy)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellpea in CA View Post
True, except I believe Bucky had a better handle on utilizing space and materials!
Yep, the Molded fiberglass egg could almost be what he would have designed and called "The Dymaxion Living Module".

I once had a graduate intern ask me if I knew that the real inventor of the Geodesic Dome was a guy named "Geoerge Owen Desic" (G.O. Desic)
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 09:35 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Name: Patrick
Trailer: R-Vision Trail Lite
New York
Posts: 592
I have an observation concerning housing options. The Tiny House movement is based on the idea of a housing unit that is compact and low in cost.
This is a fad of sorts however what they are building on these television shows is crude to say the least...if you have not watched several of these programs please do so before you respond with an opinion.

The simple fact of the matter is there have been three options available in the low cost housing industry for many years.
First is the RV which we all know about
Second is the "manufactured home"...a.k.a. The double wide or the single wide that is also called a Mobil Home. (Very cost effective but often considered an eye sore). Current offerings in this category have improved exterior design features that make them easier on the eyes.
Third is the modular home option....this system allows you to design your home to suit your budget and even allow for future additions as your needs change or family grows. I have seen these built to both low cost targets and all the way up to some very high-end estate standards. They are built in "cube-formats" that allow adding as few or as many "cubes" as your design may demand...from tiny up to HUGE.

None of these methods are currently designed to be on wheels ready to move after installation on a foundation with the possible exception of the "single-wide" and the "double-wide".

My point is this: This whole tiny house movement is ignoring the very well established quality building methods employed by the industry. The three types that I outlined are energy efficient, exceed national building codes, are stronger than an on site stick built home (because they must be moved once constructed in a controlled factory setting). The quality control of these units puts the tiny house units I have seen on television programs to shame! The manufactured house industry invented the small affordable house many years ago.

I am now retired but in my earlier life I sold building materials to building contractors and manufactured home construction businesses. Part of my background included knowing building codes. I question the designs of many of these tiny houses as seen on TV. I have seen many building code violations in the products produced....most I would call crude attempts at building uncomfortable cramped 8X24 ft. temporary structures in the name of saving a few dollars.

If you have not watched these programs give them a try and you might wonder why these free spirited souls never took the time to attend a RV show! Our tiny RV Travel Trailers will seem like estate homes after to see what the are creating!

Like all fads this too will pass.
__________________
Uplander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 10:23 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
Name: Cathy
Trailer: In the Market
Kansas
Posts: 799
These tiny houses are not meant to be a replacement for RVs. Apples and oranges.

I don't believe it is a fad as it has been going on for quite some time. This is way for younger couples to save money or older couples to downsize. It would work in some areas for an older parent/grandparent to live on the property of family and still be independent. So many possibilities.

The life of the high end RVs is estimated at about 15 years. I have been to RV shows and went through a lot of used units.

Stick rv versus the tiny houses, no contest in my mind.
__________________
Cathy P. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 10:41 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Name: Patrick
Trailer: R-Vision Trail Lite
New York
Posts: 592
The idea of parking a tiny house in someone's back yard sounds good but in fact most if not all local code officials would have some very big problems with the idea. All local zoning regulations would have to be addressed.
I could do that on my property (20 +/- acres) but most folks do not have that much land....and...even in my case the local code enforcement folks would question the lack of septic for the building and insist on a complete building inspection for code violations and that is just for starters.

The tiny house has made for some interesting hours of television but in the real world it too often does not comply with basic building codes. A fact finding trip down to your local building department might be in order.

What seems like a great idea often is not.
__________________
Uplander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 10:52 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Name: Mr
Trailer: small
State
Posts: 226
I don't consider it a fad so much as a fringe thing. If it were a fad, all sorts of people from all walks of like would be jumping on the bandwagon. In reality, it seems to be mostly folks with an independent, slightly rebellious spirit (not in the bad sense, necessarily), thinking this may be a way to cover basic needs while avoiding conspicuous consumption. Some of them will love the lifestyle, at least for a time, and some others will decide it isn't for them.

Until recently, I owned a tiny house that was on my property as a guest house. It was 225 square feet, and had full plumbing, kitchen, double bed and living room space. It was really comfortable for two, and was extremely nice, and better than code in all areas. While I could easily live in it, my wife would find it restrictive. But, I believe that going any smaller than that would require significant compromises of some type. This one was built on a foundation, not a trailer.

There is no question that the average house is much larger than needed, often to the point of wretched excess. The tiny house movement is the counterpoint to that - an effort to find the minimum necessary. Basic comfort balanced with economic pressure will eventually lead most people to something in between the two extremes.
__________________
Mr. W. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 10:53 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Name: Lyle
Trailer: Scamp 13
None
Posts: 527
Uplander, Get more information than what you see on one, money motivated, TV show. Calling names and disparaging other people's choices, just because you do not like them is very juvenile. You obviously have not actually investigated the movement, you watched a TV show.

If you intend to fully comply with building and zoning codes, you will not be building a tiny house - that is the point, they are not allowed for very tenuous reasons that have nothing to do with safety, everything to do with more money in the builders (who write the codes) and banker's pockets. That is why most are built on trailers.
__________________
LyleB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 11:04 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul E Henning View Post
(clip)
Until recently, I owned a tiny house that was on my property as a guest house. It was 225 square feet, and had full plumbing, kitchen, double bed and living room space. It was really comfortable for two, and was extremely nice, and better than code in all areas. While I could easily live in it, my wife would find it restrictive. .
We used to call those "Mother-in-law" units and the RE ads would also list them with that name. Here is CA they are now often called "Casitas" or "little houses" and are attached to McMansions with a breeze way. But the purpose is the same. Mom's close, but not to close. LOL
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 11:08 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 5,560
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uplander View Post
...My point is this: This whole tiny house movement is ignoring the very well established quality building methods employed by the industry. The three types that I outlined are energy efficient, exceed national building codes, are stronger than an on site stick built home (because they must be moved once constructed in a controlled factory setting). The quality control of these units puts the tiny house units I have seen on television programs to shame! The manufactured house industry invented the small affordable house many years ago...
I own a site-built home (850 sf, built 1962) and currently live in a double-wide manufactured home (1750 sf, built 2006) provided by my employer. Everything about the manufactured home is lightweight and often poorly assembled. At least a third of the electric switches and outlets had loose connections. The dryer vent in the floor was blocked by a frame member and had to be relocated. The carpet tack strips protruded through thin carpet. The roof supporting structure is so marginal that it cannot support a second layer of shingles on top of the original. Components are designed for light weight, not longevity. Yes, they are designed to be moved… once. According to the transport driver, it is common for an 8-10 year-old manufactured home to weigh 50% more than from the factory (due to lightweight components being upgraded with standard-grade replacements), and for frames to fail during relocations.

I do understand that manufactured homes have their place, their own set of codes, a lower cost-per-square foot, and for a variety of reasons, it was the right choice for our current situation. I will say it is well-insulated: one medium-sized wood stove heats the whole thing on about 3 cords of wood a winter.

But compared to a site-built house… apples and oranges.
__________________
Jon in AZ is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 11:28 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
David Tilston's Avatar
 
Name: Dave W
Trailer: Trillium 4500 - 1977, 1978 (2), 1300 - 1977, 1973, and a 1972
Alberta
Posts: 5,316
Registry
My brother lives in an 8' x 8' x 7' box in his employers parking lot. His "Cube" can be lifted, by the upper corners, onto the deck of his crane equipped flat deck truck. He uses it for on site housing when working out of town.

Not much room, but he still has a big flat screen.
__________________
David Tilston is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 11:52 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Name: Lee
Trailer: Casita
Texas
Posts: 244
Registry
Maybe a little different direction in this conversation about tiny houses but has anyone out there googled or looked on Pinterest at gypsy vardo's? I am guessing because I don't know for sure that these are the original travel trailers. The workmanship and attention to detail on many of these is absolutely stunning. I have not seen any interior pictures of these that have bathrooms or kitchens but many do have small wood burning stoves which would come in real handy in a european winter. There are a few outfits that make them to be towed behind a motor vehicle instead of a horse. It would be nice to see a show about them on a weekly basis like they have for the "tiny houses".
__________________
Lee
Captleemo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 12:00 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Name: P
Trailer: Casita
Washington
Posts: 109
I lived full time in a 27 foot long travel trailer. It was set up in one place and I had it moved once before selling it. I could not afford to rent any of the houses available at that time. I did not have a vehicle big enough to move it.


It was unpleasant. In the winter, I'd wake up to frosty walls. I had skirting around it, heat tape on the water hose, and had blocked off half the windows with fiberglass batting. My feet were freezing, my head was quite warm, and sometimes the condensation dripped, so NO SPAGHETTI was cooked during winter. The fridge quit working when temps got in the 20s, which they did for most of the winter. I kept a cooler outside and rented a meat locker in town.


Those tiny houses would be a major improvement. Most look nicer than a travel trailer with skirting and plugged up windows. Because of the insulation, they'd be healthier and more comfy. Maybe they'd have more than 5 gallons of hot water available for showering too?


One would have been perfect for me back then. But they would have cost more than my travel trailer.


I have seen a couple of those shows. One was where the couple decided to use a toilet that holds bags and twists them up. I was thinking that was going to be spendy for them.
__________________

__________________
slowpat is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Changing out 13" wheels for 15" wheels Ed Morris Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 2 06-25-2012 09:51 AM
Egg shaped house on wheels DannyH General Chat 2 05-19-2011 01:19 PM
Jay's tiny House (trailer) DonDeutsch General Chat 2 02-26-2010 07:25 PM
Video of tiny folding FG trailer Andrew Gibbens General Chat 20 12-11-2006 07:04 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.