tire blowouts - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-03-2014, 04:17 AM   #1
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tire blowouts

Not sure if this is the right place for this but has anyone ever noticed that when a tire comes apart it's always on the plumbing side ? Besides a tire it takes out all the black/gray water plumbing with it ? From the ones I've seen happen it's about 90% on the plumbing side, from bad to worse. Just tossing this out there.
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Old 06-03-2014, 07:41 AM   #2
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Can't say that I have noticed that, but I have noticed that tires that just "Come Apart" are usually well over 5 years old.... Just a hint?
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:27 PM   #3
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That's probably correct Bob, I didn't ask anyone of them I saw. I have had two of my camping buddies have 1 and 2 year old tires come apart, both took the plumbing out, one had the steel belts do a job on the wheel well also.
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:52 PM   #4
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Tire Experience

We've towed our Scamp 16 or equivalent for 7 years, averaging almost 8 months a year on the road.

We average lots of miles and drive some unusually rough roads. This week we drove a 130 mile road to Harbour Breton, NL loaded with pot holes. As well we've driven a 1,000 mile dirt road across Labrador.

We keep our tire pressures at max, 50 lbs and check the pressures regularly. We also change them after 3 years. We have always used Goodyear Marathons, though some knock them, we've never had an issue.

To help us monitor tire action we do have pressure and temperature sensors on both trailer tires and paranoidly touch tire and hub at every stop.

We are not the fastest rabbit on the track with 62 mph a top speed for us.
As well we tend to drive early in the day and rarely exceed 150 miles in a day.

On this trip we have picked up a nail in a CRV's tire. Our sensor instantly reported loss of pressure. We have carried a tire repair kit for our 13 years on the road and have used it 5-6 times to repair tires, important on some of the far out travels. (On the Harbour Breton road there was no cell service so no way to call for help though we have used our Tow vehicle/trailer AAA coverage in Canada with success.)

In our opinion trailer tires should last. Equally important is checking them often and buying the best ones you can. Can a blow out happen? Of course, all we can do is to try to minimize the chance of a blowout.

WIsh you safe travels without blowouts,
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Old 06-03-2014, 07:19 PM   #5
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sensors???

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Originally Posted by honda03842 View Post
To help us monitor tire action we do have pressure and temperature sensors on both trailer tires and paranoidly touch tire and hub at every stop.
Norm,

Would you please describe the pressure and temperature sensors that you use?

Thanks,

David
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Old 06-03-2014, 08:08 PM   #6
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I use these guys:

Trucking System Technology |TST Trucking Systems

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Old 06-03-2014, 08:52 PM   #7
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I don't have tire sensors, but check my tire pressure daily before getting on the road. I also sometimes check pressure during the day. I do check the hub bearing temps everytime I stop for either me or the dog. I did find a problem with one of the bearings before it got too bad. I also check the wheel lug nuts before each trip. Prevention is a lot cheaper than fixing things that have gone to far.
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Old 06-04-2014, 02:45 AM   #8
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We also check the lug nuts, particularly after we lost one on crossing Labrador. Our Honda CRV is 10 years old and does not have pressure sensors so we bought a Tyre Dog set of four sensors, 2 sensors on the trailer tires and 2 on the Honda's rear tires. It was not too expensive, in the $100 range. They measure pressure and temperature. Since technology moves quickly there may be better devices today.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Fiberglass RV mobile app
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Old 06-04-2014, 10:13 AM   #9
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...Tyre Dog set of four sensors, 2 sensors on the trailer tires and 2 on the Honda's rear tires. ...
Someone on the Amazon site reviewed these and said, in a similar setup with a Casita, that they had a problem in that the sensor alarms are set for all 4 tires and since the trailer tires were at different pressure than the tow vehicle tires it was less than ideal. How do you deal with that?
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Old 06-04-2014, 10:48 AM   #10
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Someone on the Amazon site reviewed these and said, in a similar setup with a Casita, that they had a problem in that the sensor alarms are set for all 4 tires and since the trailer tires were at different pressure than the tow vehicle tires it was less than ideal. How do you deal with that?
It's my understanding that the typical 4-5 post TPMS can't be "split" between tug and tow, especially if there are different pressures involved. Each vehicle should have its own, or a combined system such as the one mentioned by Tractors1 above. Here's another choice in that department: Tug plus tow TPMS
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Old 06-04-2014, 10:58 AM   #11
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Dave I have had two tire failures. Cant really call one side the plumbing side vs the other but I do know that one side (with fridge and stove and bathroom) is slightly heavier than the other. In one case (on the lighter side of the trailer) the tire treads started to crack and came apart (4 years old at the time). The one that went on the slightly heavier side I suspect but can't say for sure that the tire may have picked something up (had been running it on gravel road on Vancouver Island for about a month at the time). I didn't have the tire guys check it, as I just replaced both tires as they were 4 years old at the time & decided it wasn't worth fixing either way.
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Old 06-04-2014, 01:26 PM   #12
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How about the hot water heater isn’t it on that side too? Could the temperature of the heater being near the tire all the time cause a premature issue? I and just throwing it out there..
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Old 06-04-2014, 02:10 PM   #13
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Why Tyre Dog

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran L View Post
Someone on the Amazon site reviewed these and said, in a similar setup with a Casita, that they had a problem in that the sensor alarms are set for all 4 tires and since the trailer tires were at different pressure than the tow vehicle tires it was less than ideal. How do you deal with that?
I choose Tyre Dog at the time, I'm guessing 4 years ago, because they were inexpensive and enough people said they worked on their cars.

I believe there's a high and low alarm. Our rear Honda CRV tires cold pressure is set at 39 PSI; the trailer tires are set at 50 PSI. We set the low pressure alarm at 35 PSI.

My tire dog monitor sets next to my ultraguage, both placed in the speedometer area of the Honda, neither is too large. I regularly glance at them. As we drive I can see the pressure and temperature increasing as the miles go by and the day's temperature increases.

We had a 'nail' flat this week and one of the Honda's tires beeped and flashed Lo P. I watched the pressure drop thru 32 PSI and knew we had a flat.

On really cold mornings the pressure sensor will go off because on cold days the inflated 39 PSI can become 35 PSI. However in a few minutes of driving the pressure gets above 35 PSI and the beeping stops.

It is also possible to defeat the fault beep which I sometimes do on cold mornings.

To read the temperature you need to push a button. I do it every now and then to see the trend, particularly if they're different from side to side. We did have a partial lock up of a brake once and the tire heated up and was visible on the Tyre Dog.

The fact that there's a 11 PSI difference between Honda tires and Trailer tires has not been a problem. (Admittedly we keep our rear and front CRV tires higher than most people who do not tow. I believe Honda suggests 26 PSI for non-towing driving. Our goal is to stiffen the tires hence higher pressure.)

All that said we have not looked at what's available in tire pressure sensors since we bought these. They have worked.

When we get a new tow vehicle this year we'll not need them on the tow vehicle because all new vehicles have tire pressure sensors.
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Old 06-04-2014, 04:09 PM   #14
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Hi Carol, I only put this out there because the majority of the rigs Ive seen with a blowout took the plumbing with it. Almost like the tire was angry with ABS
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