Trailer for emergencies- what's your plan? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-18-2016, 02:59 PM   #15
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We are close to a river so this is on my list, if worse comes to worse we can replenish water there with the proper water cleaning unit.
I have a small hand pump type water purifier from backpacking days I keep in the trailer if worse comes to worse in regards to safe drinking water.
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Old 10-18-2016, 03:52 PM   #16
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A few years back we had 90 mph straight line winds. The roads were blocked by downed tree to big to move and the power lines were laying across the roads . The power was out for a 50 mile radius . We were without power for 4 days , my brother's power was out for 2 weeks. Even if you could get to town , the gas pumps didn't work because they had no power to run the gas pumps.
The local stores were all closed because of storm damage and lack of power.
It gets 30 below here in the winter so the notion of storing water and food in my trailer would only work about 6 months of the year.
A fiberglass trailer makes a great emergency shelter during the summer or in warmer climates but in wintertime in our area it is not the answer.
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Old 10-18-2016, 04:02 PM   #17
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I have a small hand pump type water purifier from backpacking days I keep in the trailer if worse comes to worse in regards to safe drinking water.
Great idea! Only I'd put it in my emergency bugout backpack- which is still in the planning stage. A couple of weeks of extra meds for me and the epileptic corgi, emergency radio, space blanket, a little food and water, matches, and add that purifier. This to be kept in the bedroom to grab on the way to wherever- upstairs, the car, or if the road is impassable, overland to the hill. Ideally I'd get to take my trailer but that might not be a possibility so the real essentials that I can't easily duplicate- like the meds- need to be in one place. And a handy backpack that I can grab fast is a good place.
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Old 10-18-2016, 04:45 PM   #18
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Name: Peter
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Well if something were to happen right now I'm not prepared!

but like all of you we have the MH which my wife refused to have the propane tank filled as she wanted to just get home and do it later well later has come and gone, Now that the Extreme vertigo is on the Mend it will get done soon, also have full tank of gas lets us run the generator for short intervals to run the Microwave, or making sure the propane is right up, we can last 6-8 weeks in the MH.
Batteries are kept on trickle charge as soon as we get home. Drive both cars to keep their batteries charged, both are 4wd so should not get stuck unless boxed in.
Our main problem is water, if no water at hose then were in trouble as cannot store water in MH due to cold weather in winter means freezing plus water sitting for a while will cause it to skunky and that means one does not want to drink the water, okay for showering in but not for drinking.
We keep the Motorhome with enough food to hit the road for a week or more, the heat is on as soon as the weather goes to rain to keep the mould out.
Thankfully we live quite a ways from the water and on top of a hill where it cannot reach us but fire is another problem which we cannot do much about.
In a week I should be able to go and get the propane tank filled, top up gas tank, buy 2 cases of bottled water, which I keep in the garage as a bit warmer in there but easy to get.
Our biggest problem is Neighbour has several tall 130' high Firs and Cedars within 20' or our home and refuses to remove them, so far the winds have been in our favour but one of these days they will not be.
So when the wind blows from the SW we just pray and keep our fingers crossed as these trees would totally crush our home with us in it. These trees fill our roof with needles that I have to clean off every 6 months and we have had two branches come down one through the kitchen, and one through the Porch roof, both repairs were just at the top of our deductible.
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Old 10-18-2016, 04:50 PM   #19
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Our plan is to take it if we need to evacuate for a hurricane. We have 8 pets, so it will be a tight squeeze in a 13 ft. Scamp (We do have a tent we can attach), but we will not have to rely on trying to get a motel room.

We have a generator if we need to use it at home. So, that's our back up if we come back and the electricity is still out.

Since we live somewhere that the climate is bearable (uncomfortable sometimes but still safe for humans), our concerns are not as great as someone in a colder climate would have.
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Old 10-18-2016, 05:19 PM   #20
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Emergency water at home should not be a problem for most people if they have a hot water heater, that's your 40-50 gallon emergency water supply.
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Old 10-18-2016, 05:40 PM   #21
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Hi, Carol H--So, well, good points, all.
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Old 10-18-2016, 05:40 PM   #22
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Emergency water at home should not be a problem for most people if they have a hot water heater, that's your 40-50 gallon emergency water supply.
If it is still intact after an earthquake.
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Old 10-18-2016, 05:46 PM   #23
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I have six, 5 gallon cans that I keep full of gas year round. I store the gas for 6 months and use Brother P-Touch labels on the cans so I know when 6 months is up and then I use it it my truck and refill the cans with fresh gas with Stabil added. I have a generator that I can use for my house or trailer and I keep it full of gas too. The water heater as a source of water is a great idea and I have two 50 gallon rain barrels that would come in handy also. Where I live is in the hurricane zone so being able to hook up the trailer and leave is a plus. I understand that any state park in Texas will let you stay free if you are fleeing a hurricane. I also bought one of those little wood burning camping stoves in case I ran out of propane. I guess the plan is to be prepared to bail out and not need to instead of not being prepared and needing to bail out. I look forward to see many more ideas on this subject.
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Old 10-18-2016, 06:04 PM   #24
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If it is still intact after an earthquake.
Many building codes in earthquake areas require they be secured to a wall to keep them from tipping.
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Old 10-18-2016, 06:14 PM   #25
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Mine is secured, and new construction so probably okay. But it wouldn't take a lot for a pipe to break and drain a water heater.
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Old 10-18-2016, 06:18 PM   #26
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1. 2-liter soda pop bottles, if filled only to the shoulders, are strong enough to take freezing and thawing many times. FEMA suggests tap water (with chlorine added already) will be safe for up to a year, but dn't go past that. Empty, rinse well, and refill -- 6 months is better. If you remove the cap, let fresh air enter, then recap and SHAKE the bottle hard, it aerates the water which is how water comes out of our taps--aerated, so it tastes much better. THAT makes a huge difference in how it smells and tastes.


Water heater IS another good source of water.


2. Pulling together extra medications can be done even if you only refill once a month. In a year you can squirrel away nearly two weeks' worth by merely moving your refill time ahead one day a month (or so). ROTATE your saved pills so you keep only the newest ones in your emergency kit. don't let them "time out." Most meds are good for at least six months.


3. Ponchos and space blankets--much needed and can be folded up very small. Our trailer would work to keep us dry if the house roof caved in. The question would be if we would survive the house roof caving in. Who knows? But dry is better than wet unless it's hot out. Exgra socks and a pair of waterproof boots. Hat and gloves. Sunglasses.


4. Food. There are good meals available in camping supplies. Cost up to $10 for a bag, but if you find a good place to buy them, just buy one per shopping trip. Also: top ramen, cooked: 1 packet to 1/2 cup liquid from a can of vegetables, heated to nearly boiling, with a can of beef with gravy added and a can of vegetables makes a pretty good substitute for those camping meals. Packets of instant oatmeal (again, just add water)--dry powdered milk. Canned chili and plain canned beans (protein)--canned chicken & tuna. Canned vegetables. Try to store things you eat anyway. Weird food isn't all that comforting, though ANY food is comforting when you're hungry enough. Canned food has this advantage--it contains extra water. Though it sometimes contains a lot of salt and maybe sugar, too. Both are slightly dehydrating. six of one, half dozen of the other.


5. Don't forget books, puzzles, games. Those solar lanterns look super and would be vital if you wanted to read when it's dark outside.
those little triangular LED battery lights from Harbor Freight with the red light and blinking light capacity are good for signaling you need help. The batteries last a surprisingly long time. We keep one hooked to every lamp in the house in case the power shuts out suddenly. they cost about $3.99 on sale--and they seem to be on sale every other month. Ke have several in Peanut already and there they'll stay.


6. The big Q I see on these suggestions is this: do you stock up the trailer, or make portable get-away packs? Maybe we will keep our grab and go packs in the trailer--but we've been keeping them in the car in winter, including bottles of water (partly empty in case of freezing) and enough dog food for several days. We will not leave our dogs.


7. On a lighter note (all this talk of disaster is not light, nor should it be)--I discovered that Paul was going out to the car when he had a break at work and eating the emergency pop tarts, peanut butter, and raisins. Nice we could supply him a little extra snack...but...! 8) The man needed bigger lunches!


8. CASH. don't forget to stash some cash.


9. A P-38 can opener can be attached easily with a split ring to any zipper, like on your emergency bag. Any Army surplus store should have a container full of 'em for less than a dollar each. Buy several and hand them out to friends. Practice a few times so using one comes more easily to you. Learning new "technical" tricks under duress can be stressful.


Rotate, rotate, rotate! We had some emergency kits (food, water, bandages, etc.)_ our son gave us and this spring we went through them. OMG, they were 15 years out of date, parts were seeping and gummed together--even the "instant water" packs were bad. (You know what I mean--you buy the packs, and under emergency conditions, reconstitute by just adding water.) 8) . No--the water packs, all three of them, a total of 9 ounces of water, were probably still good. But totally inadequate. We learned that emergency kits aren't a one-time thing. Build them, pack them, and check them every year. I have no idea why we thought those would last "forever." They won't. They can't. And the pre-made kits--one was filled with nothing but large gauze pads, a now-rusted medical scissors, and some rolls of de-laminated sticky tape. Yeah, that'd be really helpful. all the pads had been ruined by seeping packets of food and the tape gum.


You know, by the time we get all our supplies gathered, we have a mound so big we also need an emergency camel--or elephant--to haul it.


Better keep our car well-gassed up and ready to go!


Now I want to start filling Peanut up again...having a safety hoard ready is comforting. And it'd make Peanut nicer if we ever use it for a guest room...our guests will be able to rummage up something they like.




Paul is asking--have I told 'em everything I know, and won't I miss having any thoughts in my head--sorry about the length. This is just such a good topic!
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Old 10-18-2016, 06:21 PM   #27
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We have both the MH and the Campster. I consider both of them potential escape pods. Each has beading and other supplies year round and water except in the winter.

Like a previous post, I will most likely deploy for emergency communications in a major event once I am sure that the family, including pets, are taken care of. I plan to equip both units as mobile ham shacks as well as having needed survival gear and supplies in each.

Although I am near Bobbie, I am high enough and positioned where I am not concerned about the tsunami but there are other risks such as fire, land slides, trees, etc.
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Old 10-18-2016, 06:42 PM   #28
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Mine is secured, and new construction so probably okay. But it wouldn't take a lot for a pipe to break and drain a water heater.
The inlet & outlet points are on the top of the tank.
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