Trailer for emergencies- what's your plan? - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-18-2016, 08:43 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by steve dunham View Post
It gets 30 below here in the winter so the notion of storing water and food in my trailer would only work about 6 months of the year.
A fiberglass trailer makes a great emergency shelter during the summer or in warmer climates but in wintertime in our area it is not the answer.
Which is why I do not store anything but dry packaged foods in the trailer and keep the emergency water supply by the back door in the house - that way I can take to the trailer or add some of it to the Emergency back pack kit that is stored with it in case we have to leave on foot.
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:32 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Kai in Seattle View Post
8. CASH. don't forget to stash some cash.
A very good point. When the power is out you can't buy anything electronically.

When I was in school working at a grocery store, there was a major power outage in the mall. (transformer blew) The manager grabbed a bunch of battery operated calculators. Those who had cash got their groceries.
All the prices were estimated & agreed upon by both staff and customer. The customers got some good deals for the inconvenience. Those without cash had to leave their groceries.

It was a long weekend so I picked up a load of extra hours putting stock back on shelves or into trucks. They brought in a stream of empty reefer trucks. Shelved perishables went into buggies then into the trailers on one loading bay. They had to bring in buggies from other stores. Skid stock in the big coolers and freezers went onto trailers in a second bay.
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Old 10-18-2016, 10:39 PM   #31
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It looks like our precautions and preparedness depend largely on our likely disasters. Like others from California who have responded, we prepare ourselves for the inevitable BIG ONE (a 9.2 earthquake and accompanying tsunami are predicted). Californians are frequently reminded to be ready to stay in place for 72 hours without the assistance of professional "first responders". Many private citizens are trained by our fire departments as CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) members so we can assist those who live and work near us in the first 72 hours.

We keep basic supplies in the trunks of our cars. We keep food and supplies at home, outdoors, in case our house becomes inhabitable. We keep all our camping supplies such as tent, stove, food, water, makeshift toilet at home. (We rotate the food when we go on camping trips.) Even if we did have our trailer at home (it is stored 1 hour away) we probably would not be able to drive it anywhere as many roads would be both severely damaged and clogged.

Because we have remodeled our 1950's home to comply with earthquake safety and the fact that our home is built on bedrock, we hope that our home will survive. Of course, if we are away from home all bets are off. If, by chance, we are traveling with our Scamp we should be well-supplied.

As a side note, our Scamp has survived the 2014 earthquake in Napa with nary a scratch! "At 6.0 on the moment magnitude scale and with a maximum Mercalli intensity of VIII (Severe) the event was the largest in the San Francisco Bay Area since the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. It was located to the south of Napa and to the northwest of American Canyon on the West Napa Fault."
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Old 10-19-2016, 08:54 AM   #32
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We don't live in a high seismicity zone so likelihood of an earthquake is very low. We don't live within 1000km of an ocean so chances of being impacted by a hurricane, typhoon, or a tsunami are also negligible. We don't have forests within close vicinity of our home so we are probably safe from forest fires. Our home is on relatively high ground, not close to any rivers or other water bodies, so we are probably safe from most flood scenarios. So I guess my biggest concerns are due to zombies, plague, terrorists, and acts of war.

Since I like to be prepared, I keep the propane tanks in the trailer full, plenty of clothes, bedding, and dried food and bottled beverages. I do have to make sure that at a minimum of once per month, I replace all of the bottled beer in my trailer with fresh ones (making sure that nothing is wasted of course).
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Old 10-19-2016, 10:28 AM   #33
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We don't live in a high seismicity zone so likelihood of an earthquake is very low. We don't live within 1000km of an ocean so chances of being impacted by a hurricane, typhoon, or a tsunami are also negligible. We don't have forests within close vicinity of our home so we are probably safe from forest fires. Our home is on relatively high ground, not close to any rivers or other water bodies, so we are probably safe from most flood scenarios. So I guess my biggest concerns are due to zombies, plague, terrorists, and acts of war.

Since I like to be prepared, I keep the propane tanks in the trailer full, plenty of clothes, bedding, and dried food and bottled beverages. I do have to make sure that at a minimum of once per month, I replace all of the bottled beer in my trailer with fresh ones (making sure that nothing is wasted of course).
Living close to the Canadian border we have to be constantly vigilante .
We have stocked up with the necessary provisions that we will need when the invasion happens. . My only hope is that the Canadians bring their great beer and lots of Walleyes along with them.
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Old 10-21-2016, 12:46 PM   #34
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We're a little 'Mormon like', we have 6 months of longterm food supply and a super million gallon water filter. Our park has a generator for it's well and a generator for it's sewer plant. Generally we're in pretty good shape if we're in FL.

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Old 10-21-2016, 01:43 PM   #35
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Living close to the Canadian border we have to be constantly vigilante .
We have stocked up with the necessary provisions that we will need when the invasion happens. . My only hope is that the Canadians bring their great beer and lots of Walleyes along with them.
We can also bring the poutine!
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Old 10-21-2016, 03:10 PM   #36
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We have to avoid mouse attractants in the trailer - we're in the woods on acreage and have lots of the little vermin looking to move in to a provisioned, carpeted hole in Casablanca. That said, we do keep some protein bars, tea and coffee in tins and have 5+ gallons of potable water in the fresh tank any time it's above freezing.

I've considered a tank heater to keep everything happy when it's not above freezing, but that's pretty complicated and, of course, power outages are the most common problem we face, so any such tank heater would have to include some efficient non-plug-in backup system that I have not yet invented.

I've always presumed that we could keep using the sanitary plumbing in the house if we were camping in the Casita - have to keep the black and gray tanks dry when below freezing...
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Old 10-21-2016, 04:07 PM   #37
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For us the trailer is not needed as a "shelter in place" retreat- our house is already set up to work for up to a week or so without water and indefinitely without power (or as long as we can stand not having internet ).

As an escape pod, I think I may look into a "evacuation kit" with non-perishable food and first aid supplies. I don't want to keep it in the trailer because of the extremes of temperature, but it would be nice to have it all in one place ready to go.

I appreciate the reminder about cash- I'm bad about never having any around.

I need to make a checklist of things to toss in at the last minute… like the evacuation kit, water, important papers… oh, and don't forget the trailer battery, which is always disconnected and charging inside.

Great discussion!
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Old 10-21-2016, 04:58 PM   #38
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"I do have to make sure that at a minimum of once per month, I replace all of the bottled beer in my trailer with fresh ones (making sure that nothing is wasted of course)."





Of COURSE! Gotta be reasonable aboot it!


LOL
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Old 10-21-2016, 05:27 PM   #39
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Howdy, This has been a very important discussion. On water storage during freezing weather. I worked a couple of wildfires providing communications for the USFS fire camp. I watched as every firefighter stopped for two one-liter bottles of water as they left for the fire. The bottles were distributed from a refrigerated trailer and each was frozen. This provided ice cold drinking water during their efforts and also a small amount of cooling in their backpacks. I have frozen bottled water in nearly every popular size. I have also frozen 2-liter softdrink bottles very successfully. Just don't overfill. I keep the empty space in the upright freezer loaded with frozen water bottles. This allows use of the 2-liter ice in chest refrigerators for camping instead of ice, keeps the freezer operating more efficiently with a constant load, and will be a thermal ice mass to keep freezer contents cold when the power goes out.

Thanks for all your comments, great ideas, and planning. You have thought things out very well, thanks for sharing.

Richard
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Old 10-21-2016, 05:47 PM   #40
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Hi, Richard,


We fill our 2-liter pop bottles "to the shoulder" with water. Thanks for your post!


Great idea to keep them in the freezer pretty much all the time in case of power outages. So true--too late to make ice after a power outage!


Easy to do, easy to maintain.


So many good and inspiring ideas from everyone!
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Old 10-21-2016, 07:11 PM   #41
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Anybody that likes Powerade they make great 32 oz water bottles.
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Old 10-21-2016, 10:22 PM   #42
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Good call on the PowerAde bottles, they are very durable.

Beware of using milk jugs for water storage. Milk jugs are specially designed to biodegrade after about 6 months. If you use them for regular water storage you may wake up to find a wet floor. When using them for freezing, the bottle won't leak only due to the difficulty of ice passing through the decomposing bottle. I learned of this decades ago from a preparedness seminar presenter from the state's department of emergency management; it was his personal experience.

I use distilled water for my CPAP and make sure I don't have lots of water in aging bottles since they appear to be no different from milk jugs, and after all, they will normally be recycled or disposed of in a landfill.
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