Trailer vs. vehicle tires - Fiberglass RV


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Old 04-21-2012, 02:39 PM   #1
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Trailer vs. vehicle tires

I thought I would share this information, though it have been common knowledge to everyone but me.
Just learned today the difference between a trailer tire and one designed for a car, as per the experts at Tire Rack. I previously wondered the difference as the sizes were the same or similar. I was told the radial technology used on an auto tire is designed to turn right and left while the radial design technology on a trailer tire is designed to track in a straight line. Therefore, if you use an auto tire on a trailer, your trailer will be more inclined to sway.
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Old 04-21-2012, 05:37 PM   #2
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Found this from Goodyear Tire Company

"Trailer tires are designed for heavy-duty, free-rolling applications with emphasis on tread wear, rolling resistance, stability and ease of towing. They normally have a heavier construction than passenger tires in order to meet the additional load-carrying requirements of trailer applications. Passenger tires are designed for passenger car applications and may not meet all the service requirements of trailer tires."
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Old 04-23-2012, 08:46 AM   #3
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Thanks for that info! I makes great sense and comes at a perfect time! I'm looking to replace my tires and the guy I bought the Burro from said they were car tire! Now I know to buy trailer tires!
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Old 04-29-2012, 10:40 AM   #4
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Just realize that "generally speaking", trailer tires are the lowest grade and most problematic tires produced. Countless forum discussions have shown that they have the highest rate of negative incidents.

The use of non ST tires are becoming more and more popular as end users are demanding a higher level of performance and reliability.
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Old 04-29-2012, 11:33 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MC1 View Post
Just realize that "generally speaking", trailer tires are the lowest grade and most problematic tires produced. Countless forum discussions have shown that they have the highest rate of negative incidents.

The use of non ST tires are becoming more and more popular as end users are demanding a higher level of performance and reliability.
Most failures I've know of are "user caused".
The most common is under inflating. This causes the side walls to flex too much and heat up, then blow out.
The second most common is the myth that as long as the tread is good the tire is good. NOT true. Trailer tires need to be replace every 5 or 6 years no matter what the tread is like.
Attempting to second guess the tire engineers will usually get you into trouble as Ford did their Explorer a few years ago.
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Old 04-29-2012, 11:54 AM   #6
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Trailer tires need to be replace every 5 or 6 years no matter what the tread is like.
I agree and that is one of the issues. Short life span.

When we bought our trailer from the PO it had Michelin XL passenger tires on it. They looked good but I ran the serial number through the Michelin dealer. They were 13 years old. We replaced them that day with the same and when were 10 years old we again replaced them with the same.

They work great. That is our experience.
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Old 04-29-2012, 12:36 PM   #7
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I agree and that is one of the issues. Short life span.

When we bought our trailer from the PO it had Michelin XL passenger tires on it. They looked good but I ran the serial number through the Michelin dealer. They were 13 years old. We replaced them that day with the same and when were 10 years old we again replaced them with the same.

They work great. That is our experience.
10 year old tires of any kind is looking for trouble. Passenger tires on trailers is looking for trouble.
Passenger tires on a automobile are replaced when the tread wears out, typically 3 to 4 years. Well withing the 5 to 6 year life span. Tires on trailers don't typically wear tread off.
People do a lot things and mostly get away with it, but when does catch up with you it can cause a lot heart ache.
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Old 04-30-2012, 07:56 AM   #8
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Trailer vs. vehicle tires

Just wanted to put my two cents in on this! While I'm new to trailer tires I am not new to vehicle tires and the one thing i know is just because the tread looks good and there is no appearance of dry rot, it doesn't mean the tire is good. Rotting from the inside is always a good possibility (particularly if the car or trailer has been sitting). Tires should always be inspected after three years! Last year I purchased my 2006 Town and Country with only 23,000 miles on it. The tires looked great, plenty of tread and no sign of dry rot....duh...three of the four tires were rotting from the inside. Glad I had the presence of mind to have them checked! :-)
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