Trapped in my trailer! - Fiberglass RV


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Old 09-01-2008, 10:01 PM   #1
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It was an absolutely lovely Labor Day weekend here at Heartbar. The camp was full, but everyone was clean and well behaved. I will post about that in the blog..

But, as I got back from our "Sunday" (Monday this week) host dinner, I started a fire and went to relax in my "Oneness" here in the loop. I am alone again, except for one set of tenters at the far end of the loop.. can't see or hear them from here.

No sooner had the fire built up to a good roast, I saw one. My dogs stopped cold and sniffed the air. Then I saw another.. and another. 4 were what I could say I saw individually, but who knows how many are actually circling.

I shuffled the pups into the trailer, with my stupid male making a fuss and barking at them. Once they were safely inside, I doused the full blown fire only to turn around and see one under my awning. "HEYAAAAAAAAAAA" I yelled, and it ran off.

I shuffle myself inside and could see (Its pitch black now.. can't see anymore) the coyotes circling my rig.

Bears don't bother me. They are not aggressive and don't want to eat my children.

My eldest has to pee. time to try the puppy pee pads. She isn't going out, not even with me.

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Old 09-01-2008, 11:36 PM   #2
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Gina,

And the cavalry (or flying monkeys) were...?
Glad your involvement with the "food chain" didn't get any more personal. I wonder if our 4' tall X-PEN would keep those hungry canines at bay?
At least you were otherwise prepared with the pp pads. Next week you'd better bring a motion-detector sprinkler or two.

That's pretty close to instant response to an empty campground. All of a sudden the free pickings available all summer have evaporated. Now they'll have to wean themselves and go back to hunting available rodents. Ma nature back at work.

See you in a couple of weeks!
Kurt & Ann K.
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Old 09-01-2008, 11:53 PM   #3
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I'm glad I wasn't there. I positively hate coyotes. I'd have my dogs pee in cup before I let them outside with coyotes around. It's scary that they were barely afraid of you. They've probably been living off things other campers left around all summer and now there's no one left. No wonder the tenters left!

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Old 09-02-2008, 12:48 AM   #4
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Look what we had in our yard today.. He came down for water and drank from our small water fountain.
Attached Thumbnails
IMG_3135coyotecopy.jpg   IMG_3132_coyotecopy.jpg  

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Old 09-02-2008, 01:22 AM   #5
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This is interesting. I've been around coyotes pretty much all of my life. While they are "pack" animals, they generally hunt alone because they pursue small prey.

When they hunt in packs, they are hunting larger prey.

When I was at Heart Bar last month there were plenty of chipmunks, and their cousin that I can't think of the name of at the moment, but Vector Control was capturing some for testing. If their findings led to eradication of some of them, that might be why the coyotes are packing.

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Old 09-02-2008, 06:57 AM   #6
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Coyotes are hard on dogs; something to do with eliminating the competition, just the way wolves hunt down and kill coyotes in their range. I would discuss this with your local equivalent Department of Natural Resources; if the coyotes are packing up and acting aggressively around humans, there could be trouble...
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Old 09-02-2008, 10:37 AM   #7
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As opposed to individual coyotes "packing up" this was probably a mother teaching her near-grown pups to scavenge. Another generation of bad behavior in the making. Gina, you were right to protect your dogs. Small dogs and cats are very vulnerable, even to a single coyote. Dogs that are tethered outdoors and unattended are particularly in a dangerous position.
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Old 09-02-2008, 11:04 AM   #8
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There are stories of them coming in an open garage picking off pets. cats and small dogs. They are pretty brave when they lose fear of humans.
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Old 09-02-2008, 12:41 PM   #9
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We live in town (city of 40,000-ish) and coyotes have started showing up at night in our older neighborhood, which is nowhere near any woods. Our back yard is fenced, but I'm bringing the dogs in earlier in the evening!
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Old 09-02-2008, 04:57 PM   #10
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Hi Sandra

Just to let you know, it doesn't mean much to a coyote - day or night .. Our coyote came into our yard at 3:00 in the afternoon.

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Old 09-02-2008, 05:24 PM   #11
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There are stories of them coming in an open garage picking off pets. cats and small dogs. They are pretty brave when they loose fear of humans.
We had a neighbour have a cat picked off in front of her, and another neighbour had a coyote take a minture dachshund while she was watching it potty. This in a heavily populated suburban area.
Animal Control won't help because it's not a domestic animal. State Agencies won't help because it's within city limits.

Coyotes are not our friends.
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Old 09-02-2008, 05:40 PM   #12
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Just a word to the wise on coyotes and fences. Fences do not prevent coyotes from gaining entrance. We have 8 ft concrete block fences in AZ and we watch them and hear about them springing right over them or to the top of the fences and then picking off small dogs, cats, etc. in the backyard. Their vertical leap is amazing and no fence will keep them out.

As far as a problem with humans I don't really know of any issues around here with adults, only some minor incidents with very small children. They will feed off your fear, so don't be afraid of them. I've never had any issues confronting coyotes in either singles or packs when I've been backpacking or hiking but they will test you a bit from time to time. Of course, as always err to the side of caution.
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Old 09-02-2008, 05:41 PM   #13
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As opposed to individual coyotes "packing up" this was probably a mother teaching her near-grown pups to scavenge. Another generation of bad behavior in the making. Gina, you were right to protect your dogs. Small dogs and cats are very vulnerable, even to a single coyote. Dogs that are tethered outdoors and unattended are particularly in a dangerous position.
You're probably right, David. I read it as being 6 total and that struck me as a rather large surviving litter. Then again, at Heart Bar, the chipmunks (aka snack food) are as prolific as Tribbles.

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Old 09-02-2008, 11:21 PM   #14
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I am sorry to hear coyotes bother some so much, I have known people that do have issues with these wild creatures...In no way do I want to in this post to accuse anyone here on this board of impropriety or lack of discerning empathy but I would like to post my view and avoid being preachy...

I have found great value in this site for me in the exchange of wisdoms or the presentation of different viewpoints/ideas/experiences with others here, I have encountered several "ah ha" moments thru reading the comments of others on this site for myself.

However I would like to speak for the Arizona coyotes at least...as they cannot bay for themselves on a computer.

While opportunistic in nature they mostly prefer small rodents or a stray cat once in a while, should their pack be more than a dozen individuals a domestic dog could be easy prey if given the chance in desperate times and its small enough, coyotes follow natures rules, its unaware of any other sensibilities...Its simple in the coyote universe, simply eat or be eaten, then breed and die....Not very pretty, but it is very real.

They do certainly covet the domestic dogs food bowl with relish knowing most pet owners leave it outside and unguarded except for their pooch, often a minor problem given the rewards.

Accounts of coyote attacks are almost non existent towards humans when compared to large cats or bear attacks. I was camping on the south rim of the grand canyon for 40 days this July while it was elk season here, I observed that the coyotes listen for the hunters to discharge their rifles shooting the elk, the coyote pack then moves into the area that night when most of the elk and the hunters leave, they arrive to clean up the unwanted parts of elk left for them, or so they behave.

I have had more trouble with arctic wolves in Alaska than with coyotes in Arizona, "the Fairbanks area of Alaska" the arctic wolves were far more aggressive in hunting when compared to coyotes, while both are still as shy when compared with each other and about the same size, the wolves work in more effective groups making things happen their way more often than coyotes.

I have raised Swedish milking goats in Whitman Az. and I never lost a kid to coyotes ever, just a trash container or two...They did dig up a rattlesnake I buried once eating it and they are known for being artists at chicken abductions, as good at pilfering a chicken as the resident owls there, boy I know that.

From a coyotes point of view my chickens were fat quail, slower on the run too.

In camp its wise to have nothing edible outside period...Nothing that has a food scent on it too, anything lake a wrapper or a drinking cup should not be available to any wild critters nose let alone these dogged thieves...

Sadly many animals that do lose their fear of humans do lose their lives as a cost of that. Our fear of them and theirs of us actually works to their advantage...Its healthy for both us and them in the end.

I once saw a young coyote trying to hunt in the Yuma desert area, it was hunting a local variety kangaroo rat, the young dog would hop up and down with the rat in unison in its attempt to secure a meal, it was a ridiculously funny sight, the panicked rodent was doing its best to evade the coyotes appetites, unfortunately the mouse being to far from its burro for the preferred underground escape tried to hop away quickly in the wrong direction when suddenly, a red tailed hawk nabbed the wiley mouse during a mid air hop, the talons of the bird clasping the small mouse as it climbed higher and higher into the sky, the hawks wings beating rhythmically carrying it back into the nowhere it came from with its now limp prize. The hawks attack was just a moment in time, a blur in my vision, hardly a heart beat to the dog and myself watching in a desert surprise...It was a feathered lightning strike of determined hunger...

No coyote could ever do this.

These are the moments that make camping in the rough areas worth it to me...I do remember when in mother natures house I am the guest, mother nature rules this place without remorse, in her house nothing goes to waste, including opertunities.

Well that's my coyote pitch today, the event has stayed with me quietly until today when your post brought it to memory again. I hope I do not offend anyone by recounting it now.

That coyote is dead by more than 30 years now, its descendants living presently in 2008 are probably being harassed by the merciless vacationers on spiffy A.T.V.s for thrills now...Times have changed...Horses in Arizona for riding are fewer in number, its motorized horses now, Our fiberglass trailer is now 39 years old...Boy I wish I were 39 again...My son will be soon.

I have sadly seen wild coyotes dead along the sides of the Arizona roads more often these days, their bodies broken, their crushed pieces strewn along the super roadways along with the growing amount of garbage carried there with the traffic exiting the hot city bound for the cooler rural places I loved when younger.

Cities here are swelling with more people than there are jobs here now, The cities need to call the shots for future development more and more now, the stakes are high, there are desicions for land use that are needed, decisions for water conservation which are now needed, decisions for recreation spaces and agriculture that are urgent now...Cities govern for themselves because it is important to them, its the nature of this urban beast...Beware this beast unfettered.

When the coyotes are gone, are we really going to be better off with out them?

Coyotes are not so bad...Watch them awhile they will teach us all about ourselves in the story of their delema.

Harry


Quote:
It was an absolutely lovely Labor Day weekend here at Heartbar. The camp was full, but everyone was clean and well behaved. I will post about that in the blog..

But, as I got back from our "Sunday" (Monday this week) host dinner, I started a fire and went to relax in my "Oneness" here in the loop. I am alone again, except for one set of tenters at the far end of the loop.. can't see or hear them from here.

No sooner had the fire built up to a good roast, I saw one. My dogs stopped cold and sniffed the air. Then I saw another.. and another. 4 were what I could say I saw individually, but who knows how many are actually circling.

I shuffled the pups into the trailer, with my stupid male making a fuss and barking at them. Once they were safely inside, I doused the full blown fire only to turn around and see one under my awning. "HEYAAAAAAAAAAA" I yelled, and it ran off.

I shuffle myself inside and could see (Its pitch black now.. can't see anymore) the coyotes circling my rig.

Bears don't bother me. They are not aggressive and don't want to eat my children.

My eldest has to pee. time to try the puppy pee pads. She isn't going out, not even with me.
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