What can I carry into Canada? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-20-2010, 11:46 PM   #15
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Larry Lecuyer said "The high tourist season and most expensive, starts in early September"

What!? Where did you travel in Canada?

Larry Lecuyer said "You will experience a major language barrier"

That only occurs in one province, Quebec. The original poster said they were traveling west. There will be less of a language barrier going to western Canada then there would for them to go to the deep south of the US.

And our gas and food might be a bit more expensive, but our beer is better!
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Old 07-21-2010, 01:33 PM   #16
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I have been PMed about a few misconceptions. There is no where in Canada with a 16% Sales Tax, How ever i will state that there are a few Provinces with Sales Tax at the 15% level. Where I live its 5%.

In Canada there are two official languages. One is French and the other Is English. In Western Canada you do not hear much French being spoken as It is mainly used in Quebec and a few other spots in Eastern Canada.

When I go to another Country I exchange my Money at my home bank and get that rate for that day. When I use a Credit Card , It comes in as a International transaction and I pay the rate for that particular day. When you try to exchange your USD at a Canadian store you will be charged for it. Nothing comes free. Rates change min by min so stores have to be carefull. I found if i got taken it was my own dumb self for not doing the right thing in the first place. No matter where you are just be aware of the customs of that Country your in.

Campgrounds are some what similar to hotels. They have High and Low seasons. I found this to be true in the USA also. Our cost for some items cost more and fuel is one of them. The price for fuel can vary all over Canada.

I would like to think of myself as an Ambassador of Canada when I visit a Foreign Country, and would never consider reading the riot act to a store clerk. They are just doing there job.

Come to Canada and enjoy what we have to offer.

Happy Trails
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Old 07-21-2010, 04:30 PM   #17
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One suggestion I thought I read somewhere was to use the ATM on the Canadian side to receive money in Canadian denominations. The site said this made buying things easier. Do you agree?
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Old 07-21-2010, 04:50 PM   #18
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I have heard the same thing. When I was in the USA, I never even tried to use it while there. Next time down I will try it. If it works that would save on carrying too much cash.

Using money from the country you are in saves a lot of problems.
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Old 07-21-2010, 06:28 PM   #19
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When I was in Mexico I used ATMs for Mexican money. Worked very well - should do the same in Canada.
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Old 07-21-2010, 08:10 PM   #20
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I'll be doing the reverse trip, travelling from Edmonton, Alberta through the USA coming up back into Sarna/ London with the Boler. We are not bringing any food stuff crossing and will buy small amounts of what we need when we find a grocery store. The one thing with crossing the border, is never bring fruits, veggies, milks, cheeses or meat.
That way you avoid all and any hassles at least with the food issues.
And on the "major language barrier", no language barriers here in Alberta, BC, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, etc......maybe Newfoundland but Quebec is the only one, you would have a language issue with.

Quote:
Larry Lecuyer said "The high tourist season and most expensive, starts in early September"

What!? Where did you travel in Canada?

Larry Lecuyer said "You will experience a major language barrier"

That only occurs in one province, Quebec. The original poster said they were traveling west. There will be less of a language barrier going to western Canada then there would for them to go to the deep south of the US.

And our gas and food might be a bit more expensive, but our beer is better!
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Old 07-21-2010, 09:19 PM   #21
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It's so much easier to answer the border guard's question, "What fresh produce and meats do you have with you?" with "none" than to make a list, and hope you've not forgotten something.
Each state/country/province/territory has its own local economy to protect, and with all the international "hitch hikers" that hide in food and firewood (and tire treads, and hiking boots, etc...), we can all easily see why restrictions are in place.

Besides, it's fun to explore new local foods, restaurants, and yes! beers, too!
Sherry
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Old 07-22-2010, 07:20 AM   #22
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Quote:
Larry Lecuyer said "The high tourist season and most expensive, starts in early September"

What!? Where did you travel in Canada?

Larry Lecuyer said "You will experience a major language barrier"

That only occurs in one province, Quebec. The original poster said they were traveling west. There will be less of a language barrier going to western Canada then there would for them to go to the deep south of the US.

And our gas and food might be a bit more expensive, but our beer is better!
Yes, and so is our health care, poverty rate, and crime statistics.

And, regarding money, Can I use my Canadian money in the U.S.? For sure, no.
But I can get American money from American ATMs; and Canadian money from Canadian ATMs. Right now the exchange rate favours American money - that is, if I want $100 American, I have to pay about $105 Canadian for it at my bank; but that rate changes daily, as it does on both sides of the border. I also find travellers cheques to be a good way to carry money without carrying cash.
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Old 07-22-2010, 11:08 AM   #23
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The wife and I jumped through a lot of hoops to get a Nexus pass. This lets us use an express lane at certain border crossings and airport customs line-ups for travel between Canada and the US. There are a number of restrictions to the use of this pass. If coming into Canada by air, you cannot use the pass if you are carrying any beans or products made from beans. So, if you were in Hawaii and bought a pouch of Kona coffee, you have to get in the long line.

Still, I recommend the Nexus pass if you are going to cross the border two or more times a year. When we have crossed with our trailer at a crossing with a Nexus lane, we have typically saved an hour of waiting. Southbound we have always been asked about fresh foods and dog food. Northbound, we have always been waved through. Southbound without a Nexus lane, the interview is much much faster than with just a passport.

For Canadians: http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/prog/nexus/menu-eng.html
For Americans: https://goes-app.cbp.dhs.gov/
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Old 07-22-2010, 11:52 AM   #24
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We use ATMs wherever we travel be it in the USA Canada England or Scotland it is a lot easier than carrying cash in large amounts.
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Old 07-22-2010, 12:06 PM   #25
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So if I bring my favorite Amaretto-flavored coffee beans, I am in trouble?

How about my favorite chocolate soda in cans? Snapple or is that available in Canada?

CindyL
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Old 07-22-2010, 12:10 PM   #26
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So if I bring my favorite Amaretto-flavored coffee beans, I am in trouble?

How about my favorite chocolate soda in cans? Snapple or is that available in Canada?

CindyL
Yes I have seen Snapple in our stores. I don't know about coffee beans. LOL
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Old 07-23-2010, 12:06 AM   #27
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Quote:
So if I bring my favorite Amaretto-flavored coffee beans, I am in trouble?

How about my favorite chocolate soda in cans? Snapple or is that available in Canada?
You can bring coffee in. It is no problem at all. But you can't bring it in by air and use a Nexus pass to dodge the lineup.

You do see Snapple here, but I can't recall details.

I live 1.2 miles north of the USA, and the new trailer makes the US a more appealing destination than it has been since 9-11. But I try to be foodless when I cross the line. It just saves hassle. The exceptions are spices and condiments, and the Canadian breakfast cereal, Shreddies.

When I was a kid, crossing the line was a lark. Now it is a serious hassle, and I always take steps to cross as infrequently and simply as possible.

Last time I checked, big no-nos southbound into Washington were apples and some potatoes. Dog food has to be factory-sealed and a product of the USA.

First stop on the USA side is always an ATM. Second stop is the food store. I make almost all purchases on my credit card. Very convenient, but the exchange rate is not very good.

I am not a fan of travellers cheques. Most store clerks have never heard of them. I never saw one or would have known what to do with one when I was a gas jockey 20 years ago - and they are even less common nowadays. KarenH - What is your experience?
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Old 07-23-2010, 07:17 AM   #28
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Hi Ron - yes, you're right about travellers cheques. I have always had them accepted, but sometimes it takes a talk with the manager of the store. In case of serious question, I could go to a bank and cash them, but haven't had to do that.
I just don't want to carry large amounts of cash, anywhere!!
How about debit machines in stores - are those big in U.S.?

Quote:
You can bring coffee in. It is no problem at all. But you can't bring it in by air and use a Nexus pass to dodge the lineup.

You do see Snapple here, but I can't recall details.

I live 1.2 miles north of the USA, and the new trailer makes the US a more appealing destination than it has been since 9-11. But I try to be foodless when I cross the line. It just saves hassle. The exceptions are spices and condiments, and the Canadian breakfast cereal, Shreddies.

When I was a kid, crossing the line was a lark. Now it is a serious hassle, and I always take steps to cross as infrequently and simply as possible.

Last time I checked, big no-nos southbound into Washington were apples and some potatoes. Dog food has to be factory-sealed and a product of the USA.

First stop on the USA side is always an ATM. Second stop is the food store. I make almost all purchases on my credit card. Very convenient, but the exchange rate is not very good.

I am not a fan of travellers cheques. Most store clerks have never heard of them. I never saw one or would have known what to do with one when I was a gas jockey 20 years ago - and they are even less common nowadays. KarenH - What is your experience?
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