Yet Another Way To Have a Bad Day Towing - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-22-2008, 03:36 PM   #15
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I am now looking for a fiberglass trailer, and have a question. If you're driving along, are these lightweight trailers more prone to blow over than a heavier one would? Yesterdays picture showed one unside down. What caused that?
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Old 01-22-2008, 03:59 PM   #16
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I am now looking for a fiberglass trailer, and have a question. If you're driving along, are these lightweight trailers more prone to blow over than a heavier one would? Yesterdays picture showed one unside down. What caused that?

In a word NO.

The side surface is a lot less, and with rounded corners less pressure will build up.

I'm not sure what picture you're talking about. If you're talking about the videos above, the first was a UHaul on a snowy road. More than likely started sliding around, speed and loss of control. The second one is sway. That's caused by an imbalanced load, which usually means not enough tongue weight. I've seen guys hauling cars on trailers that think they can reduce the tongue weight to near 0lbs, my guess that is tongue weight was way too small.

In eastern Oregon there's Big rigs blown over almost every year along with some big ole sticky. I've never seen one of our little trailers get blown over.
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Old 01-22-2008, 04:08 PM   #17
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In a word NO.

The side surface is a lot less, and with rounded corners less pressure will build up.

I'm not sure what picture you're talking about. If you're talking about the videos above, the first was a UHaul on a snowy road. More than likely started sliding around, speed and loss of control. The second one is sway. That's caused by an imbalanced load, which usually means not enough tongue weight. I've seen guys hauling cars on trailers that think they can reduce the tongue weight to near 0lbs, my guess that is tongue weight was way too small.

In eastern Oregon there's Big rigs blown over almost every year along with some big ole sticky. I've never seen one of our little trailers get blown over.
Well, that is true what you say about the big rigs. Thanks for the info.
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Old 01-22-2008, 04:14 PM   #18
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Regarding blowing over, a light fiberglass trailer would be more likely to blow over than a pop-up trailer because the center of gravity and the wind pressure on the latter is so low on the latter. However, I'd prefer a light fiberglass to a heavier sticky (or that UHaul) because the egg is more aerodynamic.

Regarding brakes, when Roger had his stopping incident (his controller was out of adjustment), he still had the option of manually using the controller had he remembered it in time (I likely wouldn't have, but had I, the brakes were there, not the money in my pocket).

Also regarding brakes, they MUST be used carefully in the event of trailer sway. If they are applied too hard when the trailer is not behind the tow vehicle, they may lock and the trailer will then skid sideways and not straighten out. IMHO, a friction sway bar would make such a scenario worse, which is why the warning to loosen under slippery road conditions.

I agree that the tongue weight in the sway incident was probably too low, likely to keep the tow vehicle from sagging in the rear.
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Old 01-22-2008, 09:40 PM   #19
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I would suspect that the cause was actually because the driver was using his cruise controll. On wet or snowcovered roads if one wheel loses traction it can actually speed up and when it re engages with the pavement will cause you to loosa controll as seen. Most manuals state this somewhere.
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