A question of hardness - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-02-2013, 10:41 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Name: Derek
Trailer: 1973 boler 13', Earlton On
Ontario
Posts: 396
Registry
A question of hardness

I am in the process of bolting my new axle onto my Boler frame. This seems like such a simple question. What nuts and bolts do I use? The old bolts are a little rusted, but they are in OK shape. I COULD use some anti-seize on them and recycle them. That said, they are rusting and probably of similar vintage to the axle I'm retiring. I could also go into a store like Home Depot or Canadian Tire and match the old nuts and bolts as close as possible. Will the Home Depot version have enough hardness to withstand the forces of this application? Home Depot sells nuts and bolts of all shapes and sizes, but they say nothing about hardness. *sigh* It seems like such a simple question. What should I do? Can anyone offer any wisdom on this matter?

Derek

PS If you followed the old thread, you know that the first axle was 1/4 inch too small. They replaced it at their cost and it appears that this one is the correct size. I'm just getting started on installing it, but we will see what happens from here.
__________________

__________________
glamourpets is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 12:42 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Thomas G.'s Avatar
 
Name: Kinga DeRode
Trailer: For Sale Or Rent
Rooms to Let 50 Cents
Posts: 5,103
You should use grade 8 bolts for your axle. They are in a separate section at the big box stores and are more expensive. The cheapest place to buy them that I have found, is Tractor Supply, where they are sold by the pound.

If the old bolts just have surface rust you can probably reuse them.
__________________

__________________
UHaul and Burro owners, join the UHaul Campers on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/groups/529276933859491/
Thomas G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 02:25 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Name: Bill
Trailer: Lil Snoozy / Jeep Cherokee
Pennsylvania
Posts: 253
Registry
Go with Thomas G's suggestion.
Don't be tempted by stainless as I saw someone do last summer trying to avoid rust.
NEVER use stainless in a high stress usage as they will eventually fail.
__________________
Bill in Pittsburgh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 02:28 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Name: Art
Trailer: Helite
Posts: 164
And use the BLUE thread lock fluid. Blue because you can get the nut off someday in the future. Red if you never want it to be removed. Use the thread lock even if you use a lock washer.
__________________
Art VanDelay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 02:33 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Mike Magee's Avatar
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 5,145
Most bolts commonly sold are grade 5 hardness, IIRC. Grade 8 is the next step up. You can usually tell the grade by the number of raised lines radiating outward on the hex cap (top of the bolt). But I have forgotten how many lines mean which grade... anyone else know this?

PS-- after seeing the topic name, I'm glad this thread isn't x rated.
__________________
How much time do we have left? 2 Chr. 7:14
Mike Magee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 02:40 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Thomas G.'s Avatar
 
Name: Kinga DeRode
Trailer: For Sale Or Rent
Rooms to Let 50 Cents
Posts: 5,103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Magee View Post
Most bolts commonly sold are grade 5 hardness, IIRC. Grade 8 is the next step up. You can usually tell the grade by the number of raised lines radiating outward on the hex cap (top of the bolt). But I have forgotten how many lines mean which grade... anyone else know this?

PS-- after seeing the topic name, I'm glad this thread isn't x rated.
I believe that the common bolts sold are not even grade 5.

Here is a reference to the head markings. http://thermosealinc.com/THERMO_RESO..._Cross_Ref.pdf
__________________
UHaul and Burro owners, join the UHaul Campers on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/groups/529276933859491/
Thomas G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 02:50 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
mmeyer's Avatar
 
Name: Michael J
Trailer: U-Haul VT
Indiana
Posts: 472
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill in Pittsburgh View Post
Go with Thomas G's suggestion.
Don't be tempted by stainless as I saw someone do last summer trying to avoid rust.
NEVER use stainless in a high stress usage as they will eventually fail.
Not to mention that if you don't use anti seize with SS nuts you will likely never get them off without breaking or cutting. Sometimes what you think is better can be a lot worse.
Michael J
__________________
mmeyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 02:59 PM   #8
Raz
Senior Member
 
Raz's Avatar
 
Name: Raz
Trailer: Trillium 2010
Vermont
Posts: 4,064
Bill is quite correct about stainless steel. Depending on the alloy, I read it's about grade 2.

I recently bought my self a new torque wrench. While researching, I ran across an article that stated unless specified, applying grease, oil, thread lock, or anti seize all change the torque number. For those interested here is the torque article.
Torque wrench buyers guide

Finally, grade 8 SAE is equivalent to grade 10.9 metric as I recall.
__________________
Raz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 03:23 PM   #9
Commercial Member
 
Ian G.'s Avatar
 
Name: Ian
Trailer: 1974 Boler 1300 - 2014 Escape 19'
Alberta
Posts: 1,304
Registry
I agree with all that has been said. Any suspension bolt must be Grade 8,
Also torque the bolt to the correct specifications, don't guess, attached is a Torque Chart for reference
Bolt Torque Chart
Ian G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 03:05 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Jared J's Avatar
 
Name: Jared
Trailer: 1984 19' scamp
Kansas
Posts: 1,610
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill in Pittsburgh View Post
Go with Thomas G's suggestion.
Don't be tempted by stainless as I saw someone do last summer trying to avoid rust.
NEVER use stainless in a high stress usage as they will eventually fail.
I get your point, but that's somewhat inaccurate. Plain hardware store stainless fasteners, yes. I've used stainless fasteners that would make a grade 10 bolt look like nothing. You wouldn't want to pay for them, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Art VanDelay View Post
And use the BLUE thread lock fluid. Blue because you can get the nut off someday in the future. Red if you never want it to be removed. Use the thread lock even if you use a lock washer.
Properly tightened, not necessary at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian G. View Post
I agree with all that has been said. Any suspension bolt must be Grade 8,
Also torque the bolt to the correct specifications, don't guess, attached is a Torque Chart for reference
Bolt Torque Chart
Grade 8 won't hurt, and I probably would use it, but it wouldn't have to be, necessarily. There are many more factors than that. Fact is, a few decent size grade 5 bolts will have a yield strength much higher than most axles.

The bigger problem is chinese "grade 5,8 hardware", often isn't. tests have had some of them failing before U.S. grade 2 hardware. There are also good overseas suppliers, but buyer beware. Tractor supply has quality hardware, Horrible Fright has weak hardware.
__________________
Jared J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 06:38 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
Take the old "slightly rusty" bolts and chuck them. They have been stressed for almost 40 years and the risk of using them to save a few $$$ is a bad investment!!!!! I suggest going to a "Real" hardware supply house and getting real grade-8 bolts (Meaning not Chinese Junque), your trailer is worth the investment.
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 06:47 AM   #12
Raz
Senior Member
 
Raz's Avatar
 
Name: Raz
Trailer: Trillium 2010
Vermont
Posts: 4,064
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian G. View Post
Also torque the bolt to the correct specifications, don't guess, attached is a Torque Chart for reference
Bolt Torque Chart
Great site, thank you. Raz
__________________
Raz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 07:00 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Joe MacDonald's Avatar
 
Trailer: Trillium
Ontario
Posts: 754
try any local supplier like Northfast, Spaenaur, Rastall, they will have the bolts you need, and it won't be that expensive. I myself tend to use Nylock nuts, the ones with the little nylon insert that squeezes on the thread, that and a lock washer, and torque to spec, then forget about it, its done

Joe
__________________
Joe MacDonald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 03:51 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Steve Hilby's Avatar
 
Trailer: Compact Jr
Posts: 259
Don't use stainless nuts with stainless bolts. I was amazed at how fast and firm they can seize. I spun a stainless nut by hand onto a stainless bolt once to check something, and the darn thing froze solid. I couldn't get it loose, even with a wrench, and eventually ended up throwing the bolt/nut away. It was quite surprising.
__________________

__________________
Steve Hilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I have a question..... ShirleyA Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 14 02-07-2013 12:35 AM
Question Rob M Forum Admin, News & Announcements 3 10-26-2009 09:51 PM
TV Question Pat M Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 21 05-04-2008 11:47 PM
Answer a Question then Ask a Question CarolnJim General Chat 77 06-03-2006 12:39 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.