Blown foam insulation?? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-29-2002, 06:17 PM   #1
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Blown foam insulation??

We're loving our new little Compact Junior camper. But here's the hitch (ooh, good pun). We love getting out and about at the time of year when most people aren't camping. For instance, we took the camper this weekend to Yellowstone Park and saw elk, bison and grizzly bears - and very few humans. Our style! But the nighttime temperatures were in the teens and that's chilly!

So my question is with regard to insulation. Our camper has no lining or insulation, just the shell, so it gets pretty cool in there. My hubby had the great idea to gut it (it needs it anyways) and have a thin layer of insulation blown in onto the fiberglass surfaces. Has anyone done this? Or heard of it being done? We'd want it done well, so would definitely have a pro do it. Any thoughts? Suggestions?
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Old 10-29-2002, 06:44 PM   #2
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insulation

The blown insulation sounds awkward - and somewhat messy. I'd also wonder just how durable it was...

If I were in your position - I'd look into indoor-outdoor carpeting with built-in padding. The insulation would MOSTLY come from the foam padding, but the carpet would contribute as well. The carpet would also be pretty darn cozy. My Boler has this odd foam insulation which is coated with vinyl. If I were starting from nothing though - I'd go with carpet. If I remember the picture of the compact Jr - It's fairly square - which makes the job easier.

Mike
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Old 10-29-2002, 07:29 PM   #3
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have I done it.

yes and no.
we had a concrete dome home and had the outside sprayed. you have to paint it with something, but you would want to anyway because it turns yellowy. The cover was very durable until baseball size hail hit it and made dents. but it does insulate. I have heard for years about them spraying trailers. I think it would work better then carpet alone and if you want a more durable finish then put on the carpet. that would be really snug. We did use induistrial grade. That's the best choice if it's not well protected. IMHO

I have considered something to fill the voids in my insulation. I looked in the cabinets and they didn't think it nessesary to insulate in the cabinet. To me this is not acceptable. I will do some type of insulation in these areas but it might be that, by the roll, someone talked about because the spots are not that large.

If you are putting the cabinets back where they are after you spray, you might want to NOT take them out. the foam would fill any holes or voids and make it really tight. Just make sure they get in all the little places. Just a thought, but some thing to think aobut.
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Old 10-30-2002, 08:54 AM   #4
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Ensolite

The ensolite used in Bolers, Trilliums and probably Scamps is still available. There was a web address for it on the Bolerama site about a month ago.
Nancy
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Old 10-30-2002, 09:34 AM   #5
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thanks

Thanks for the ideas. This gives us something to think about. I'm imagining if we did it I'd want a foam that was pretty hard, otherwise little fingers would want to poke holes in it, and it just wouldn't wear well.
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Old 10-30-2002, 11:37 AM   #6
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Carpet

You might also consider using the same carpet that Scamp uses inside their trailers. It is carpet, plus an air bubble mat plus a reflective foil layer, with the entire mess glued to the walls before the cabinets, bunks, closets, etc., are installed. Altho the Rvalue isnt all that great, it means that a heater can keep up in pretty low temps (conversely, it also means that if the trailer bakes in sun in summer, it takes a while to cool down at nite).

The really nice thing about the carpet in cold camping is that you don't get much condensation. With carpet, heater and some selective window coverings, one can be quite comfortable.

Pete and Rats who have adjustable insulation in their milk-jug bedroom
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Old 10-31-2002, 01:10 PM   #7
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Spray Foam

A friend of mine had foam sprayed on the inside walls of a motorhome he was building. He was warned by the insulation contractor of potential problems with the process. As I understand it there is a lot of heat built up during the process and it may warp the material it was attached to. The walls that it was applied to was heavy guage steel. It did not warp but I would think that problems would develop with thin fiberglass.
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Old 11-03-2002, 08:08 AM   #8
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Roll type- Air cell insulation

Check the big box, Home Depot or Lowes, for the roll air cell insulation used in pole barn construction. This material is approximately 3/8" in total thickness and comes in widths from 24'-48' at various roll lengths.

The application process is cut to fit area, use water based contact glue on surfaces and apply. At all seams tape with the aluminum tape for tight seal. Then cover with the polyprolene fabric, same as that used in Scamp or boat interior surfaces, which will help with condensation moisture on interior surfaces. This carpet adheres with the same glue used for insulation. The insulation specs are R10+ with this combination. The secret as previous messages mention is filling all the exposed areas and those hard to reach nooks and crannys, Fx.
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Old 11-03-2002, 03:50 PM   #9
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According to my Scamp manual, the "double bubble foil" plus carpet-like headliner is "about R15" and non-flammable adhesive is used.

According to Scamp's parts list, the headliner sells for 6.00 USD per sq yd, and the "foil ray insulation" is 0.75 per sq ft (calc 6.75 USD per sq yd), altho my list is dated last year.

Pete and Rats
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