Bottom Paint and Bed Cushion Condensation - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-08-2008, 01:33 PM   #1
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I've just about wrapped-up full renovation of '72 Compact. New everything, including floor.

I think I've seen this topic or a varation of it before, but should I seal the exposed bottom of the floor? It'd get wet under tow in the rain, so it will slowly weather. But should I leave it bear so that small leaks or condensation can wick out of the flooring (3/4 inch ply)?

Also, in all of our first three outings this summer, we've noticed wetness on the bottom of the settee cushions in the mornings. In sealing the tops of the under-bunk-cabinets did I create a moisture barrier/collection point? The original table was flormica, so is everyone else's. Is this just part of the joy?
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Old 08-08-2008, 02:31 PM   #2
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If it were me, I would seal the wood to keep the moisture out. Wet wood leads to rotten wood.

The whole fiberglass thing is a vapor barrier. You might want to consider one of those Solar powered vents that they use in boats to keep the air moving out. I see them advertised in boat catalogues, www.jcw.com, and in camping world. Cost in the $100USD range. Also, you could put a small moisture heater in the rig, they are advertised to keep the moisture out - I use one and it is working for me.
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Old 08-08-2008, 02:52 PM   #3
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Just replaced floor in my Compact..... The original floor had some sort of sealer on it--- not very much of it I may add. (had rot on it-see first photo) I sealed the new floor with an aspjalt sealer I had... (actually it was driveway asphalt sealer). Two coats gave a pretty good covering. Then when putting the floor in, I caulked the edge of the fiberglass before dropping the floor on. (the other option I was thinking of was a layer of fiberglass resin similar to what a Scamp has from the factory.
I think the main cause of floor rot is from the inside out....... Larry
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Old 08-08-2008, 05:56 PM   #4
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My Astro does the same thing, its the same body as yours mostly and has the same condensation issues of an uninsulated single hull. For cold weather camping I had a slip cover made for it out of a solar tarp, it allows a dead air space between the cover and the hull, the escaping heat pockets around the coach raising the temp of the hull slightly above the condensation point...also I leave a pop up window unzipped when I cover it, its cracked open to also allow the moisture from inside occupancy to exit the trailer at the open window and the moisture condenses out side the trailer inside the cover between the trailer and the cover itself...this tends to greatly reduce the available interior moisture ie condensation...The slightly open pop up window also helps add heat under the cover. I can camp down to the 20 degree F. also if it hails it does not rain condensation inside.

This approach worked well for me...the issue of the floor was the same, I sealed using Thomson's water seal first then when it dried I sprayed evaporative cooler spray sump seal under the coach, spray it all...the more expensive auto under coating in a can spray and sound proof works well but is more expensive.

Harry

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I've just about wrapped-up full renovation of '72 Compact. New everything, including floor.

I think I've seen this topic or a varation of it before, but should I seal the exposed bottom of the floor? It'd get wet under tow in the rain, so it will slowly weather. But should I leave it bear so that small leaks or condensation can wick out of the flooring (3/4 inch ply)?

Also, in all of our first three outings this summer, we've noticed wetness on the bottom of the settee cushions in the mornings. In sealing the tops of the under-bunk-cabinets did I create a moisture barrier/collection point? The original table was flormica, so is everyone else's. Is this just part of the joy?
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