Casita underbelly - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-08-2016, 10:44 PM   #1
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Casita underbelly

I got the information package from Casita--prices and all the info. On the different models--but I didn't see anything about the underbelly. Do they enclose it or sprayfoam and add heating so tanks are protected? Would like to know if anyone owning a Casita has any info. on this. Also would you camp in cold weather (I'm not talking about snow) below 32 degrees for any length of time. How well insulated are the Casitas. Interested in a 17' Spirit. P.S. was just reading advice in 18degrees and no LP. Found good info. there. But would still like info. on underbelly of travel trailer.
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Old 01-09-2016, 07:55 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by janisg View Post
...Do they enclose it or sprayfoam and add heating so tanks are protected?....
No
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Old 01-09-2016, 08:23 AM   #3
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Freshwater tank, hot and cold water lines and, black water tank are basically inside as part of the fiberglass mold. Grey water tank is outside. That said I would not have any water if I was camping at freezing temperature. Even if you had heat in the trailer remember that you have to get there and come back with a freezing thermometer and 60 mile an hour wind chill I wouldn't chance having my drain pipes freeze.
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Old 01-09-2016, 08:33 AM   #4
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Casita, like almost all molded fiberglass trailers, is intended for use in above-freezing conditions. With care, that can be stretched a bit, but it is not designed for four-season use. The fresh and black tanks are protected inside the cabin, but the grey tank and shower drain pipes hang down below. Wall and ceiling insulation is minimal and there is none below.

For a reality check on the challenges of using a Casita (or similar) in winter conditions, see this thread. You can also give this blog a read: 8 Legs and a Trailer.

Only two molded fiberglass manufacturers make true four-season models, with upgraded insulation, double pane windows, enclosed tanks, and ducted furnaces: Bigfoot (2500-series models) and Oliver. A Bigfoot 25B17.5 is a nice alternative to a Casita 17 for winter camping. It's a bit heavier, and new ones are very expensive, but used ones come up for sale from time to time at reasonable prices. Here's a recent sale: 2005 25B17.5G.

It depends a lot on whether cold-weather camping will be an occasional thing or a regular part of your plans. I also read the thread "18 Degrees and No LP." I lived in a travel trailer for three years in a location where winter temperatures regularly dipped into the teens and occasionally single digits. The trailer was equipped for four-season use, and I didn't experience any of the issues discussed in that thread. I did let the bathroom faucet drip slightly on the coldest nights. If I were planning extended winter use, I would want a true four-season trailer like the Bigfoot.
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Old 01-09-2016, 08:38 AM   #5
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And this one:

Winter Camping.
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Old 01-09-2016, 03:27 PM   #6
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Thank you all for your help. Right now I'm reading a lot of threads and happened to come across some that said the temps dipped below 32 and I wondered what happens to the tanks--i know the water tank would freeze. I don't have a TT yet so I'm thinking of all types of problems that could pop up and how to deal with them. No, I don't want to do winter camping but I figure there might be a time when very cold weather will happen for a short time. Again thanks for all the info.
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Old 01-10-2016, 07:38 AM   #7
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Now you've got me thinking, Janis... I think I see where you're going with this.

I recall there was a pretty good cold spell at Big Bend last winter. So let's say I'm out for a couple of months in the winter "snowbirding" in the southern tier of states. My Casita, or other non-four-season trailer, is not winterized and the plumbing systems are in use. Then I realize I'm going to get caught in several days of below-freezing nights. What should I do to protect the vulnerable components?

Obviously if it's just a degree or two below freezing, that's one thing, but if it's going to drop into the mid-twenties or below, that's different.

I'd certainly make sure I have plenty of LP and power to run the furnace. I'd disconnect and drain the water hose. Fresh and black tanks should be fine. I might top off the fresh tank and open doors or hatches at night to let heated cabin air circulate into those spaces.

What else should I do? Drain the grey tank? Pour RV antifreeze down the sink and shower drains? Anything else?
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Old 01-10-2016, 10:46 AM   #8
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The was a thread some where on another web sight where a guy that was living in his camper in Alaska was flushing his toilet with RV antifreeze. I don't be leave he was using his gray tank at all. He had a plastic bin in his sink to catch the water from his sink. He was also heating his camper with a Kimberly wood stove (Unforgettable Fire, LLC | Kimberly™ & Katydid™ Wood Stoves expensive but probably the best on the market.
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Old 01-10-2016, 11:00 AM   #9
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one other problem with the casita grey tank is that it doesn't drain all the water due to the way the discharge piping is installed. some report say that up to 5 gallons is left in the tank all the time unless a 2" pipe mod is done(this springs wishlist).

These trailers are built in warm Texas and they have next to no insulation at all. The bathroom doesn't have any venting for heat and unless the bathroom door is left open, you will freeze up during the night if its cold out. Windows are single pane sliders that leak air. Definitely a 3 season camper.

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Old 02-05-2016, 12:46 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
Now you've got me thinking, Janis... I think I see where you're going with this.

I recall there was a pretty good cold spell at Big Bend last winter. So let's say I'm out for a couple of months in the winter "snowbirding" in the southern tier of states. My Casita, or other non-four-season trailer, is not winterized and the plumbing systems are in use. Then I realize I'm going to get caught in several days of below-freezing nights. What should I do to protect the vulnerable components?

Obviously if it's just a degree or two below freezing, that's one thing, but if it's going to drop into the mid-twenties or below, that's different.

I'd certainly make sure I have plenty of LP and power to run the furnace. I'd disconnect and drain the water hose. Fresh and black tanks should be fine. I might top off the fresh tank and open doors or hatches at night to let heated cabin air circulate into those spaces.

What else should I do? Drain the grey tank? Pour RV antifreeze down the sink and shower drains? Anything else?

This is what I'm talking about! Below freezing for a short time--what would I do--thanks Jon for your help.
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Old 02-05-2016, 02:35 AM   #11
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For a few hours time I don't think there would be any problem with the Casitas external tanks and shower drain plumbing. Interior plumbing such as the water pump that has water trapped in a confined space may break as the expanding ice has no where to go. The fresh water tank has a vent. Don't think you have that same confined problem with the outside items. Think of a plastic bottle of water in your freezer. Leave the cap on.....boom. Leave the cap off and the frozen water backs up through the opening, no damage but maybe a mess. Your holding tanks are not air tight and the pressure will release through the cap. Of course if your holding tanks are full this response all goes out the cap .
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