Condensation - Fiberglass RV


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Old 12-15-2005, 10:36 AM   #1
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Whatare good things to stop condensation short of turning the heat off. We do keep a window open at nite (a little).
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Old 12-15-2005, 10:48 AM   #2
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bdiscount,
In order to get air movement, you need two openings. Either another window on a different wall, or open the roof vent a little. If air is going to come in it also has to have a way to escape.
Works for us!
Kurt & Ann K.
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Old 12-15-2005, 12:15 PM   #3
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Not breathing is NOT an option, but that would work....

Circulation does, as Kurt said. I have a little tiny baterry powered fan that runs, that helps with most of it.
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Old 12-15-2005, 04:43 PM   #4
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Thick curtains are supposed to help insulate the windows....I wouldn't know, I have socks that are thicker than the curtains in my Scamp. But it seems reasonable.

Pete Dumbleton has recommended putting a layer of a backpacker foam pad between the front window and gravel shield...if your trailer is so equipped. I did this on a camping trip the end of October and it helped cut the condensation on the front window tremendously.
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Old 12-15-2005, 05:36 PM   #5
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You did not say what you were heating the sacmp with. Condesation is horrible if you use a cat type heater for any period of time.
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Old 12-15-2005, 06:24 PM   #6
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We live where it's very humid, and were happy to find a product that helps keep the inside of our trailer dry. So far we've only used it when the trailer has been in storage (while parked outside), but I suspect it would help while you're camping too.


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The Eva-Dry mini dehumidifier is small (4 1/2 X 6 X 1 1/2 inches), is filled with dryrite crystals, and dries the air without using electricity. As the crystals absorb water, they change from a blue color to pink. When the crystals are pink (which means they are unable to absorb any more moisture) you remove the dehumidifier and plug it into an outlet elsewhere (where it will heat up and release the moisture it has absorbed - this usually takes overnight). Then unplug it and put it back in the trailer. We usually leave it there for a few weeks before needing to plug it in.

We originally found it at Real Goods, and later bought another one for the cab of our pickup at our local True Value Hardware store (it cost about $20). I hope this helps!

Jeanne
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Old 12-15-2005, 08:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
open the roof vent a little. If air is going to come in it also has to have a way to escape.
Works for us!
Kurt & Ann K.
I usually just crack open the roof vent a tiny bit when I am running the heater, except during heavy rain. My Fiber Stream has no added insulation (like the origonal Bolers), and I experience no condensation this way. However, when it is cold AND raining hard, I get condensation, even with a side window cracked open.
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Old 12-16-2005, 01:12 AM   #8
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Thick curtains are supposed to help insulate the windows
My "curtains" are actually heavy vinyl sheets that I roll up instead of hang side to side.

These help tremendously for temperature control. (Keeps the breeze and cold out by quite a bit) but instead of the condensation forming on the windows, it happens on the shades instead. Not nearly what I have seen on the windows tho, with the shades up.
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Old 12-16-2005, 07:12 AM   #9
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Condensation is a small price to pay for some spectacular winter camping.

Whenever warm moist air contacts a cold surface, moisture is going to condensate.

Ventilation ... as others have said ... will help but never eliminate it entirely.

Make sure you ventilate your trailer for several days after your winter camping trip ... and any residual moisture will clear up.

My advice ... don't worry about it.

In my opinion, camping in the snow is about as good as it gets.

Wipe the windows off while you are winter camping and enjoy the views.

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Old 12-16-2005, 09:16 AM   #10
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There was also a discussion about the 3M Window stuff here:

Another Way to Winterize.
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Old 12-16-2005, 11:22 AM   #11
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We live where it's very humid, and were happy to find a product that helps keep the inside of our trailer dry. So far we've only used it when the trailer has been in storage (while parked outside), but I suspect it would help while you're camping too.


Attachment 635


The Eva-Dry mini dehumidifier is small (4 1/2 X 6 X 1 1/2 inches), is filled with dryrite crystals, and dries the air without using electricity. As the crystals absorb water, they change from a blue color to pink. When the crystals are pink (which means they are unable to absorb any more moisture) you remove the dehumidifier and plug it into an outlet elsewhere (where it will heat up and release the moisture it has absorbed - this usually takes overnight). Then unplug it and put it back in the trailer. We usually leave it there for a few weeks before needing to plug it in.

We originally found it at Real Goods, and later bought another one for the cab of our pickup at our local True Value Hardware store (it cost about $20). I hope this helps!

Jeanne

I will try Eva-Dry if I can find it I will also try Dry-it, and dry-air and as last resort I will cover the rear window with plastic. I don't mind the condensation as much as the thought of having it run down the walls to make dryrot. Thanks to all for their sugestions
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Old 12-17-2005, 08:42 AM   #12
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Is there any reason you arn't using the furnace? Condensation is going to be a problem with a catylitic while neither an electric or the standard furnace will cause this problem (the furnace vents exhaust outside the trailer when running).
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Old 12-17-2005, 08:46 AM   #13
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John, some of the cat heaters vent as well. Mine does (When I can get it lit!)
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Old 12-17-2005, 10:30 AM   #14
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Is there any reason you arn't using the furnace? Condensation is going to be a problem with a catylitic while neither an electric or the standard furnace will cause this problem (the furnace vents exhaust outside the trailer when running).
It condensates when I use the furnace, which has a vent to outside I didn't go outside to check next time I will. I also had 1 window open I will try 2 open next time. It won't be for a while as we are froze in now
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