Crack in Fiberglass - need help - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-27-2014, 12:09 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Name: Darrell
Trailer: 1972 Trillium
British Columbia
Posts: 10
Crack in Fiberglass - need help

Hello all.
I purchased my Trillium last year, knowing that there was some sort of "crack" underneath this metallic tape starting at the top left edge of one of the windows. Anyway, as I was removing a window to reseal with butyl tape (had some leaks last year), I removed the metallic tape to reveal a more substantial crack than I had envisioned. See pics. I searched a bit on this forum to troubleshoot this, but I'm still at a loss. I'm just not sure how serious this crack is....ie is it something I just buy Captain Tolley's crack sealer cure for?

Would appreciate some guidance.
Attached Thumbnails
crack1.jpg   crack2.jpg  

__________________

__________________
parmtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 01:03 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
deryk's Avatar
 
Name: deryk
Trailer: 2012 Parkliner 2010 V6 Nissan Frontier 4x4
New Jersey
Posts: 2,086
Registry
Ouch! Well relax it is fixable. A bit harder because of the color of your egg. Are you planning on painting it? Generally I would open the crack up a bit and sand the surrounding area and lay up some cloth and epoxy...sand it smooth and paint it...I never got into re gelcoating and most of my cracks on my boat were under the waterline so was easy to hide with bottom paint.

There are products of thinned epoxy that you can apply to let it seep in and harden....if the crack is visible on the inside under rat fur or carpetting I would sand it down to bare glass and layup a few layers of cloth and epoxy to strengthen the repair.Wood preservation, rot repair, and restoration using epoxy resin on boats, homes and log homes.
__________________

__________________
deryk

All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost.... J.R.R. Tolkien
deryk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 01:48 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
David Tilston's Avatar
 
Name: Dave W
Trailer: Trillium 4500 - 1977, 1978 (2), 1300 - 1977, 1973, and a 1972
Alberta
Posts: 5,314
Registry
The first question is, what caused that crack. Is there a structural issue that is causing it? Or, is it the result of a big OOPS! If it is structural, then the root cause should be addressed.
Could you zoom out a bit on those pictures? Is that the road side, or the curb side. It looks like a side window, is it? The crack does not seem to have separated much.

Assuming that there is no larger problem, then the solution is to grind the crack, from both the outside and the inside, (yes strip the Ensolite back) down to paper thin, at the crack to 3" or so back from the crack. Then, on both sides lay down fibreglass mat in strips 6" wide, then maybe 4", then 2". till the seam is thicker then the original. Then grind, and/or sand, smooth, especially on the outside. Then paint to match.
__________________
David Tilston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 05:53 AM   #4
Member
 
Name: Kenny
Trailer: 16' Standard
Ohio
Posts: 88
Registry
Cause

Darrel
I agree with David Tilston about determining the cause of the crack. I can only speak as a welder and have repaired metal tanks such as boilers, stacks and so forth. It is common practice and written in construction codes to radius the corners when cutting openings in any structural item. I see in the picture you added that the opening is cut with a sharp corner. This creates a "stress riser" in other words an the area that would most likely fail when stressed because in has a weak spot designed in it. There may not be anything wrong with your trailer simply prolonged vibration over time. Typically in metal you would radius the corners using a ratio of three to one an example would be 1" thick plate would use a 3" radius. I wouldn't think that would be good on such a thin piece of fiberglass but a any radius in your window cutout will certainly help.
To add to David's repair idea I would find the very end of the crack and drill a 1/8" hole to prevent the crack from progressing and then fill with the repair material as described by David.
Good Luck
__________________
Kenny in Ohio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 06:29 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
I think that Kenny hit the nail on the head as to the cause. A square corner is like a magnet for cracks, radiused (?) corners distribute stress, sharp corners concentrate stress, which is why we drill a hole to stop cracks.

And as Deryk suggested, it's not a quick-fix problem, it's a major repair problem. Do it right the first time or it will come back.

BTW: I know a certain FGRV reseller that loved the tape-over-a-hole/crack/damage and then spray paint method of repair. It got them hauled into small claims court where a buyer won a considerable settlement.
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 08:16 AM   #6
Junior Member
 
Name: Darrell
Trailer: 1972 Trillium
British Columbia
Posts: 10
Can't tell you all how appreciative I am for everyone's collective feedback. Looks like I have my work cut out for me. Thank you all for putting the time in to help me. I'll let you know how it works out.
__________________
parmtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 08:48 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Paul O.'s Avatar
 
Name: Paul
Trailer: '04 Scamp 19D, Tacoma 4.0L 4door, SB
ex VT, now CO
Posts: 1,265
Yes, Kenny has it right. If I had to do it I would also drill a hole (could be bigger than 1/8 inch since it will be glassed over) at the end of the existing crack before repairing. I would also make the corner of the opening with a radius as big as possible and lay the glass mat so some fibers follow the outline. Hopefully this was the highest stressed corner of the opening and the others are OK. Look at the other corners once you have the window out and create a radius in each and smooth it out with sandpaper.
The crack was the result of stress concentration and fatigue.
Never fly an airplane with square windows! Luckily, nobody is stupid enough to make those any more. De Havilland Comet was a beautiful plane, but had square(ish) windows... Look it up, here are pictures:
https://www.google.com/search?q=come...=1058#imgdii=_
__________________
Paul O. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 09:26 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Name: Darwin
Trailer: 2002 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Posts: 3,029
Send a message via Yahoo to Darwin Maring
Stop Drill at the end of the crack to prevent it from going further.
__________________
Darwin Maring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 10:06 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
David Tilston's Avatar
 
Name: Dave W
Trailer: Trillium 4500 - 1977, 1978 (2), 1300 - 1977, 1973, and a 1972
Alberta
Posts: 5,314
Registry
Yes, drill a hole at the end of the crack, then grind around the hole, till it is paper thin, just like the rest of the crack, before you start filling back in with polyester resin and glass.

As for adding a radius to that corner, it might be hard to get the window back in if the radius is too large. This is an old Trillium, with jalousie windows after all.
__________________
David Tilston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 12:07 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Name: Darwin
Trailer: 2002 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Posts: 3,029
Send a message via Yahoo to Darwin Maring
It would be really nice if you could get something on the inside of the crack (Back Side and glued with at least 1 inch overlap on both sides of the crack)
__________________
Darwin Maring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 12:28 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
deryk's Avatar
 
Name: deryk
Trailer: 2012 Parkliner 2010 V6 Nissan Frontier 4x4
New Jersey
Posts: 2,086
Registry
The only fix is as suggested already...open the crack up a bit with a dremel, grind/sand the surrounding area down around it and lay up a few layers of cloth and epoxy....let it cure then sand and fair it out and paint it.... things should be done right and since its at the corner of a window frame its likely to happen again if it isn't done right.
__________________
deryk

All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost.... J.R.R. Tolkien
deryk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 12:36 PM   #12
Junior Member
 
Name: Darrell
Trailer: 1972 Trillium
British Columbia
Posts: 10
Getting together my equipment list....
What type of grinding wheel would I need for this job?
For the fiberglass cloth and epoxy, if I went into a boat repair shop, do I need to be specific on what I ask for?
__________________
parmtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 12:53 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Name: kevin
Trailer: 13' Scamp
Colorado
Posts: 170
No Epoxy

Don't use epoxy if you are going to gel coat. You can get away with it, but better to use polyester resin rather than epoxy since gel coat is polyester resin and so is the rest of your camper.

It should be noted that I have done all my repairs using epoxy and then gel coat over it. I had a hell of time with amine blush because I was working in the winter in my garage. It won't be such a problem in the summer, but I would still use polyester resin, bondo, etc. if I had to do it over again.
__________________
KevinScamps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 01:09 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Name: Steve
Trailer: Scamp 13
California
Posts: 1,416
If this were mine I would clean the back side and use woven fiberglass 12" wide running almost a foot past where you think the end of the crack is. putting a large repair past the crack will move the stress point way beyound the fracture and stabilize the area. I would use probably 2 layers of 6 to 10 oz fabric. I would not thin or repair the crack on the out side unless you have too. Once you open that can of worms the trailer will look like crap until you get the whole thing redone. The repair isnt complete until you grind the outside and finish with more glass but that doesn't mean the repair is failing its just less ugly. There is a reason this shell cracked eithor the floor is failing or the inner support for the roof has had issues or something allowed this area to flex uncontrolled. I would continue to look for the cause and effect.
__________________

__________________
stevebaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Crack in fiberglass DebbieDB Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 3 06-03-2013 06:41 PM
Fiberglass crack paxchristus Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 12 08-15-2012 12:22 AM
trillium 1300 frame crack recall info colinn Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 8 10-18-2008 03:36 PM
Fiberglass Crack Repair Jay Moeller Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 3 05-08-2008 12:08 AM
trillium crack. Ian Harrad Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 10 12-12-2006 08:06 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.